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Weathering Flex Track
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 Posted: Wed Oct 22nd, 2008 08:39 pm
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Paladin
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Thanks gentlemen.

Dave :-   Have added that to the recipe.

Dan :-  A very good point that you make regarding the rails shifting within the spikes.

From the suggestions put forward I wonder if I am making more out of this than I should.  It appears there are many simpler methods being used, but I enjoy experimenting :Brilliant:

Don




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 Posted: Wed Oct 22nd, 2008 09:19 pm
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Paladin
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Stage #4

I have now added the Ballast,

I used fine Silica Sand which is the sand pavers use for gap filling outdoor paving.  it forms a stiff crust when damped, but I added a little white glue to water and sprayed it on with a little pump  pack. It set quite well after 12 hours.

To the naked eye it looks OK, but it does appear rather coarse when photographed up close.  Not sure if I like the colour, so I shall do ground cover around it to see if that helps with the overall look.




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Don McL
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 Posted: Wed Oct 22nd, 2008 10:57 pm
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Paladin
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Stage #5

Base ground cover has been added, used a little dirt and some brown WS stuff. This was sprinkled onto a bed of white glue, then some dirty brown water that I had used to clean acrylic paint brushes, placed  here and there.

Two pictures herewith.   Up close and an overhead shot taken from about 2 feet away.






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Don McL
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 Posted: Wed Oct 22nd, 2008 11:20 pm
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danpickard
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Don,

as far as colour goes with the ballast, I've usually been more concerned about the texture.  Colouring can be done with acrylic washes at a later stage if neccessary.  That painted styrene almost looks a bit cobblestone...

Dan Pickard

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 Posted: Thu Oct 23rd, 2008 07:03 am
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Stickboy
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danpickard wrote: Don,

That painted styrene almost looks a bit cobblestone...

Dan Pickard


Precisely what I thought! That's a useful thing to know...

Track looks great by the way:bow:



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 Posted: Thu Oct 23rd, 2008 08:27 am
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Paladin
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Dan :-

I agree completely with your comments about texture being more important than colour.  The fine sand I used is not fine enough. if I choose to use this silica sand in the future I would need to come up with a method of crushing it before using.

Starting to sound like more work, it would be easier to source a finer substitute. To that end has anyone used Tile Grout ?. Maybe sifted dirt is a option.

I am open to all suggestions

Don



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 Posted: Thu Oct 23rd, 2008 10:06 am
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loggeron30
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Don,

I've used crusher fines for ballast and then sift that through a flour sifter.  You can get both color and texture.

Also, by fatr the best ballast I've ever seen or used is from Arizona Rock Company

http://www.rrscenery.com/index.html

Chhers,

Ken



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 Posted: Thu Oct 23rd, 2008 10:31 am
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Dave D
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I used tile grout to recolor the ground cover my HOn3 display dio if you remember that Don.

I used it like you would Bragdon powders.


Before grout





After grout



I have seen where others have used straight grout in smaller scales but learned it can be tricky.

It acts like flour so if you drop a drip onto it ....you get a mini moon crater.

I found if you get it down and shape it the way you want, you can then mist it from a distance with a fine spray of WW fluid until it's surface is moist. You can then drizzel diluted white glue on it without deforming it.

Don't beat yourself up over the texture I think it looks just fine for On30....I would just concentrate on the color.

BTW, I didn't do anything to color those ties on the diorama...the grout did all the weathering for me.

Carry on my good man!!! :Salute:



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 Posted: Thu Oct 23rd, 2008 04:56 pm
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danpickard
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Don,

I've certainly use the grout before, especially for a real backwoods look where there essentially wasnt ballast, just track sunken into the mud.  There is a good range of colours in the grout, and it is reasonably good to work with like a weathering chalk.  I have previously done the initial mudding in of the track (found it better to build up in several layer, fine mist of wet water to make each layer go off, and it can avoid the flour craters like Dave describes), and then go back with some alternate shades of grout for contrast which can be dusted on.  A final misting of the wet water should set off the last dusting of grout.  The quicker alternative to building up the first mud/dirt layers is start with what ever "ballast rock" stuff you have around, and then fill over with the grout technique once you are close to the ballast height you are after. I suppose it depends on the theme you are modelling still, as the grout/dirt is probably more typical of a logging scenario.  A mining operation would be more likely to use a rougher crushed rock ballast since they would have plenty on hand due to the nature of their operation. 

Dan

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 Posted: Fri Oct 24th, 2008 12:05 am
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Dave D
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Dan makes an excellent point Don.

Most of the old logging lines didn't even bother with rock ballast...they just used dirt and if near the end of the line they may not use anything at all!



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