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Weathering Flex Track
 Moderated by: Herb Kephart Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  Next Page Last Page  
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 Posted: Fri Oct 24th, 2008 04:28 am
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Paladin
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Stage #6

I have darkened the colour of the ballast, This was done using a thin wash of acrylic grey. Have added some ground cover, this seems to drag the eye away from the tracks.

The grass and tussocks were done using a static grass unit ( First try for me )
Used 2 different colours and 2 different lengths. It took awhile to get the hang of it.




What did I learn from this little experiment.

#1  Its really not that hard
#2 Make sure you like the texture of the ballast
# Colour is something that can vary again be sure it suits you
#3The ground cover sets it up as a whole picture and will hide some of the things you are not really happy about
#4 Should apply the KISS principle, I went to a lot of trouble Getting the ties to show detail.  This gets buried to a large extent never to be seen again
#5 The Dullcote and Alchol works great to give the aged look to the ties
#6 I think Peco track can be made to look OK, Ties are still short but not as noticably once details are added


This test was about 6 square inches---- Only got another 400 square feet to go.

Please tell me what you think of the end result. I am a big boy and I can take it:boohoo

Don






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 Posted: Fri Oct 24th, 2008 04:54 am
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danpickard
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Don,

All looks satisfactory to me mate.  As you pointed out, might not look perfect as such a small piece of real estate, but when the other 400' is finished it should complete the picture, especially once the other distractions of shrubs, trees, terrain, structures etc enter the scene.  The acrylic wash sometimes need to be done a few times to build up its depth.  Its almost like the first wash puts a skin on the sand for additional coats to bind too.

Good test piece,

Dan Pickard

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 Posted: Fri Oct 24th, 2008 07:35 am
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Dave D
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Looks great from here Don!

Most importantly, you learned 6 important lessons....or was that 7? :Hmm:

The most important of them is #1. :bg:



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 Posted: Fri Oct 24th, 2008 12:40 pm
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Herb Kephart
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Don-

My previous comment about tie length, that is so evident when looking at the bare track is hereby canceled. Yes, they are still the same length, but when painted, ballasted, textured, etc., it all blends in and is noticed only if looked for. I say go with it- there is a lot to be said for "good enough"

The finished job looks just fine!

I'm Herb Kephart, and I approved this message:old dude:

(Might not ring any bells down under, but here in right side up land, we're sick of hearing that phrase)



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 Posted: Fri Oct 24th, 2008 11:46 pm
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Paladin
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We have a bloke down this way that says something along the same lines, very annoying.

And another legal bloke who always closes with  " And I, so, advise"

Don



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 Posted: Sat Oct 25th, 2008 12:57 am
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Paladin
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Who looked at the flextrack ????




And you even knew what this thread was about

Last edited on Sat Oct 25th, 2008 01:00 am by Paladin



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 Posted: Sat Oct 25th, 2008 01:40 am
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ytter_man
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What flextrack? ;)

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 Posted: Sat Oct 25th, 2008 10:21 am
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Dave D
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Right you are Don!!

Only thing is that Forney looks way too new.

Ship that up to me so I can dirty it up for you.

I'll ahhh........ I'll have it back in no time......yeah that's it .........no time at all.    



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 Posted: Mon Oct 27th, 2008 09:34 am
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madmike3434
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Paladin wrote: This is stage 3

This I thought was a little gem from Woodie.

Simply spray with Dullcote , allow to dry then randomly apply Iso-Prophynol with a brush allowing it to wick where it wants. this gives it the aged silvery grey look.

Unfortunately I can not get the aged effect to show up very well in the picture.




don, what woodie is explaining is what i have expressed more than a few times on this forum. That when you spray dullcote over something and then use a wash of alcohol and ink there is a chemical reaction between the dullcote lacquer with talc in it ( flattening agent )  and the alcohol giving a fuzzy grey look to what ever it is.

I usually use it for tar paper roofs to age the roof more to a faded look. You can spray the dullcote onto a alcohol wet surface or brusg alcohol over a dullcote surface, either way works.

 

For greater variety in your rail ties , try doing some of them floquil : grime, dust, mud, roof brown, railroad tie brown and a custom mix of multi browns.  After everything has dried drybrush the surface with antique or reefer white to hi-lite the surface.  Final painting should be to drag a brush full of thinned grimey or oily black down the center to simulate oil/grease dripping onto the surface.

Weathering rail can be as simple or complex as you want it to be. Take your digital camera and find some track you like the look of and take some pics for reference. Anybody questions your track , show them the picture !!!

madmike3434

 

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 Posted: Thu Oct 18th, 2012 07:11 pm
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W C Greene
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Here's another "oldie but goodie" thread which should be followed closely. Almost every day I hear someone ask-"how do I weather my track?". Don shows how it is done in great detail and anybody can do this. Now, let's see some weathered rail...I will post a photo of mine.

Woodie



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