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 Posted: Thu Jan 8th, 2009 09:42 am
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Dave D
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Sorry, I forgot all about setting this area up for you guys.:bang:

So...... here it is, I will move a topic started by Sullivan over here and that shall be the start.

Have fun everybody!! :glad:



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 Posted: Fri Jan 9th, 2009 11:04 am
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Sullivan
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Thanks for setting this up. We'll just have to wait and see if anyone thinks it a worthwhile topic to add to.

James



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 Posted: Wed Oct 14th, 2009 09:11 pm
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choo choo 76
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Thanks for all the fun! I just joined today, and have read many posts. The railroaders here seem to be very friendly and have helped me out with my questions. My father got me interested in trains when I was a little one. That was O guage and I'm now into HO. Will be back often as I am excited to read the forums. I use a special notebook and jot down ideas from the site. Filled many of pages today. I am also on a depot committee to keep a museum going after 120 years or so. Lets all have a grrrreat time running them trains!!!!!!:slow: I'm slow and growing old!   Choo choo   



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 Posted: Thu Sep 14th, 2017 05:22 pm
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Michael M
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Doesn't look like this thread has gone anywhere so maybe I can help to get it started.

I've ridden may of the short lines and narrow gauge lines out in the West and they typically operate at low speeds.  When I asked the conductor on the Durango & Silverton how fast the train run he replied that they usually roll at about 20-25mph. 

I have a rail truck that takes about 3 minutes to go one foot!  Maybe I'm overdoing it, but I think we should strive to slow down our trains as much as we can.



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 Posted: Thu Sep 14th, 2017 08:56 pm
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Sullivan
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Michael,
There are numerous threads about 'operations' here and some have received a comment or three fairly recently...just not this one.

I've had to ditch my narrow ops and railroading because of various real-life situations which don't need amplification here.

However, I am building an HO railroad that uses (gasp) diesel power. Since it's a one town industrial switching operation all speeds are slow. I run about 20 miles tops, sometimes much more of a creep.

Now believe it or don't, there were narrow gauge operations that sped blissfully along at high rates of speed. There was a time when a Maine 2-footer on the Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes was said to have made 100 mph! That was an exception.

Meridian Industrial, 1986

Last edited on Thu Sep 14th, 2017 08:58 pm by Sullivan



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 Posted: Sat Sep 16th, 2017 03:27 am
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Michael M
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James,

I believe I read somewhere that the SR&RL varnish would often speed along at 50-60mph.  That kind of speed would probably be terrifying for passengers traveling on the High Line of the Silverton :w:


Most of the narrow gauge lines, and even some of the standard, out west that I'm familiar with typically kept their trains at a very modest speed.  Some were down-right pokey like the Uintah Railway trying to negotiate their many tight curves.



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 Posted: Sat Sep 16th, 2017 01:02 pm
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Salada
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According to surviving historic records even heavy NG such as the D&RGW seldom exceeded line speeds above about 30mph. I have yet to see any clear sign of super elevation in period NG mainline photos.
Regards,    Michael

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 Posted: Sat Sep 16th, 2017 02:18 pm
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W C Greene
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The SR&RL 2 footer prided itself for reaching speeds of 60 MPH on flat tangent sections. This in itself is going against the old theory that a steam locomotive's top speed was approx. 1.1 times the driver diameter. The little Forneys and Prairies had drivers around 36" dia. (Sullivan, is that right?) so theoretically the top end SHOULD be somewhere around 35 MPH. Where is Mr. Ripley?

The plot thickens...
Woodie



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 Posted: Sat Sep 16th, 2017 02:56 pm
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Sullivan
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Woodie et al,

The SR&RL forneys all had 33" drivers. Heck, even the 2-6-2 Prairies had 33" drivers! Go figure. But yes, they were capable of high speeds.

Now that 100 mph was an anomaly. In fact, there are stories, one from the Bridgton, where some of the passengers actually got off the train and were walking faster than the loco could pull the train.

So, yeah, we arrive at about 20 mph for the nominal speed. But given that straight stretch of track don't get fooled. The engineer might just want to get to beans early, especially if it's the last run to home for the day.

Last edited on Sat Sep 16th, 2017 02:57 pm by Sullivan



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James Sullivan
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 Posted: Sat Sep 23rd, 2017 12:39 am
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Michael M
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"In fact, there are stories, one from the Bridgton, where some of the passengers actually got off the train and were walking faster than the loco could pull the train."


If that's true then my pokey rail truck, 3 minutes to cover 1 foot, is right on prototypical.




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