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Goosie House
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 Posted: Sat May 2nd, 2009 09:36 pm
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rich
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Looks great Don .You nailed the moss and coloring on the roof dead on

you get a few:glad::glad: and  :moose::moose: for that one.

rich

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 Posted: Sun May 3rd, 2009 08:20 am
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danpickard
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Hi Don,

The goose house has come out well.  The details in that lean too work area look great... I just can't remember casting one of those kitchen sinks!

Maybe some constructive critisism if you don't mind:Hmm:...

While you have made great efforts with some of the various textures (I really like the peeling paint effect you got) it almost looks like there is too many variations.  Main sticking point for me personally is the roof.  I think it might gel better if the roof was all shingles, or all tar paper.  There may have been prototypes that used this half'n'half practice, but in a model format it doesn't quite look right in my eyes.  Not that either finish is bad, just they don't seem to compliment each other as well.  Please take it as a positive and productive comment...been watching some of your modelling progress nicely in the past few months, and just want to see it continue to improve :thumb:.

Cheers,

Dan Pickard

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 Posted: Sun May 3rd, 2009 10:46 am
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Herb Kephart
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Don-

After reading Dan's post, I went back and looked at the pictures for the third ( or fourth?) time, and I see where Dan is coming from.

I have to say, however, that the Angora station on the Pennsylvania railroad's West Chester branch (close to where I lived as a kid) had slate shingles over the passenger end, and tarpaper over the unused (by then) baggage/freight end.

Long narrow building, no evidence that either end was an addition.


Herbie:old dude:



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 Posted: Sun May 3rd, 2009 10:00 pm
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Paladin
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Gentlemen:-

Firstly Dan I do appreciate constructive criticism.

It was only the day prior to your post that Dave and I were chatting about the Goose House. And we spoke about the issue you raised regarding to much variation and whether I had managed to pull it together.

The thought processes for this structure came about when talking with Mike, he mentioned that he had some castings of a some end walls, But they would need to have the doorway adjusted to accept a Porter.

When the castings arrived I could visualize the potential for a something a little different. There were no plans drawn nor were there any thoughts as to the finished structure, other than to utilize as many effects as possible. It just went from there, one bit at a time. I did consider doing a shingle roof with some shingles missing and patching it with tar paper, but I could not get my head around that,

Replacing the tar paper roof would not be a big issue, if only I could remember the recipe for the stain on the shingles:Doh:

Again thanks to all , your comments are appreciated

Don



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 Posted: Sun May 3rd, 2009 10:23 pm
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danpickard
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Hi Don,

Glad you understood the positive side of the comment.  I could see the patchy repaired roof idea working, but as you said, it can be a hard look to get right, especially getting a nice balance of layers happening.  I think it isn't so much the variation of materials, but perhaps more that they are all separate sections (ie tar roof, then the shingle roof, then the iron roof).  I think visually it breaks the style of the building too much...not sure if that makes sense. 

Herb,

Its one of those strange things with model building, that even if there is a prototype to base the piece on, it doesn't always look right as a model for some reason.  This occurs with not only choice of building material, but often with scale as well.  You can measure and record every length and angle of a real building, but then translate that into a model, and something doesn't look right. 

Compression in modelling is a great thing.  Good example that come straight to mind, is my mater John who built a version of a famous river wharf here in Australia (Achuca was the original, Narchuca was his models name).  He took heaps of pics and measurements of the real wharf, but when it scaled down to the model, it was just too high and too long for the scene.  In the end, his compressed version looked just right.  Funnily enough at the same time of building it, another local modeller took on the same wharf to build, but he built it pretty much to scale.  The finished piece just looked wrong...too big for the scene, too over powering almost.  It was a HO version, but looked like S scale compared to the surrounding structures and details.  Its often more a case of "if it looks right"...

Dan Pickard

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 Posted: Mon May 4th, 2009 09:16 am
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madmike3434
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best part is that Don has 3 sets of front and rear stone wall castings to play around with and build another goosie house or a porter house.

If you can raise it up far enough with short concrete foundation walls , to clear the header beam across the front door , you can get a shay thru the doors.

Somewhere in this site are pictures i built of a similar one.

mike

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 Posted: Mon May 4th, 2009 10:06 am
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Herb Kephart
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Dan-

I agree wholeheartedly with what you are saying about "looking right", I only mentioned the PRR station as one of the examples of finding a prototype for anything. I think that the ultimate test of whether a model is plausible is if the viewers recognize it, just can't place where they saw it


Herb:old dude:



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 Posted: Wed Aug 12th, 2009 06:48 am
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Timberline
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     Don,

     I like the look of the model. When I look at it, it reminds me of a building thrown up quickly with whatever was at hand by the Goose crew.  Shingles on lower roof..."We could only find so many, we'll have to use the tar paper we found for the crown!"

     I especially like the way you model rust. A nice, rich rust. Lot's of depth to it. The junk in the yard along with the grass plantings looks fantastic. The peeling paint on the walls and window frames excellent as well.  The whole seen shouts out that the Goose crew built this with the best materials that they could find on hand.

     The junk tire on the roof, holding down that section of corrogated roofing caused me to picture a scene with a fierce windstorm and one of the crew sees the roofing coming apart. He grabs the closet thing he could find; a junk tire and tosses it upon the roof. Problem solved.  Nice touch.

     I've spent years working for power companies and as usual, there was always a 'limited budget'. So, when we needed something we made it with leftover things laying around the plant.  This works in real life..why not in a model scene.

    Well done Don.

 

P.S. Most of all, I really, really like the way you modeled a kitchen sink. How the heck did you get those paper towels rolled up like that? :bg:

                                                                                       Loren

                                                                           

Last edited on Wed Aug 12th, 2009 06:53 am by Timberline



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 Posted: Fri Sep 4th, 2009 01:21 pm
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madmike3434
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NEWS> ...I may be offering an all stone walls version of a goosie house near the end of sept. Just awaiting the arrival of a goosie to see if what i have in mind will work.  I have already modified an entrance wall to clear the height of the unit.

I am thinking my stock side walls (2 needed per side ) will be too short in inside length at 10".????  we shall see .     Would be fine for a shay or climax at 7 1/2" and less than 12 foot to top of stack height.  The Forney should also fit too.

 

mike

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 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2012 09:26 pm
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W C Greene
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And here's another thread that needs to be revived. Don did some great work and ya'll need to check this one out!

Woodie



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