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Switching District
 Moderated by: Herb Kephart Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  Next Page Last Page  
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 Posted: Sat Jul 18th, 2009 10:27 pm
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extra7000south
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Sounds like a plan Dwyane.

The guitar box plan is quite interesting. I have had several emails with the owner. He loves to talk about the layout as well as tips on his construction. It also gave me a few ideas of my own...LOL.

I like the plan with the plan that you have chosen. I think Carl's Micro site shows some basic designs for a transfer table.

Keep us posted!! :cool:

Last edited on Sat Jul 18th, 2009 10:31 pm by extra7000south



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 Posted: Sun Jul 19th, 2009 12:22 pm
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W C Greene
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Hey guys-such tiny layouts can be a great excuse to try handlaying the track. Then one wouldn't be constrained by "traditional" RTR switches (turnouts) and almost any track plan envisioned can be built. You need a #3.5 rt hand switch..no problem. You want a 14 something degree crossover...it can be made. Look beyond the available track pieces and imagination is the only limitation. Just my thoughts.    Woodie



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 Posted: Sun Jul 19th, 2009 04:17 pm
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extra7000south
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W C Greene wrote: Hey guys-such tiny layouts can be a great excuse to try handlaying the track. Then one wouldn't be constrained by "traditional" RTR switches (turnouts) and almost any track plan envisioned can be built. You need a #3.5 rt hand switch..no problem. You want a 14 something degree crossover...it can be made. Look beyond the available track pieces and imagination is the only limitation. Just my thoughts.    Woodie

I never thought of it that way Woodie, but that's a great idea, something to be considered especially with limited space requirements.

Thanks for the idea!! :thumb:

Last edited on Sun Jul 19th, 2009 04:18 pm by extra7000south



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 Posted: Sun Jul 19th, 2009 09:57 pm
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Herb Kephart
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Hand laid track looks better because you can incorporate minor variations in spacing and alignment .without being locked into the geometry of manufactured track,Another advantage, besides the ones that Woodie pointed out, is that switches (I abhor the term “turnouts”) can be made with a curved rail clear through the frog, unlike some ready to lay model ones, and the prototype a small, but useful amount of space can be saved by this.Small layouts are made for small cars and locos, which can run on tight radii. I have had switches on 1 1/4” gage trolley layouts that were built on a 9” centerline radius. I have seen a 2 1/2” gage trolley layout with 12” radius switches- think about this-That is the same as a little over 3” radius in HO. If you limit yourself to #4 switches, a lot of space will be wasted.
Hand laid track looks more realistic because the tie spacing and alignment can be varied. Hand laid track is cheaper- you can buy all the components and spend less than ready lay track, or you can salvage rail from discarded ready lay, cut ties from a piece of straight grain soft pine, and even make your own spikes from office staples if you want.


Right about now some one is saying- “but I can't solder”. The only part of a switch that soldering is essential (prove me wrong here Woodie) is the connection of the points to the throw bar, but the point assemblies can be salvaged from discarded ready lay switches. Frogs can be built, and then filled with epoxy


If you can build a kit, you can hand lay track. (and if you can hand lay track, you can learn to solder)


It has been said before—TRACK IS A MODEL TOO




Herb:old dude:



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 Posted: Sun Jul 19th, 2009 10:03 pm
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W C Greene
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Herb-actually, you could use small 1MM screws to attach the point rails to the throw bar. The frogs would probably cause the unschooled in soldering a real challenge. Of course, anyone who uses 2 rail power distribution needs to know how to solder anyway.       Woodie



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 Posted: Sun Jul 19th, 2009 11:15 pm
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Herb Kephart
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As to the frogs Woodie- you know how I make mine- and if all the pieces were fitted. and held with spikes, the flangeways could be flooded up to the railhead with epoxy and later opened with a hacksaw blade just like I do with solder


Herb:old dude:



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 Posted: Thu Aug 6th, 2009 11:38 pm
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dwyaneward
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Ok it's been awhile since my last update so here a couple of old photos more to come.

Track is just pinned in place, testing layout.













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Dwyane Ward | Fairview, TX
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 Posted: Sat Aug 8th, 2009 04:49 pm
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teetrix
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Looks good so far:thumb:! The trackplan is absolutely my cup of tea, I think it's great fun on a small space. I would maybe build the transfer table a little bit longer as in the original design, to fit for a loco with three wagons.

Michael

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 Posted: Sat Aug 8th, 2009 09:06 pm
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extra7000south
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Off to a good start Dwyane. :thumb:



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 Posted: Mon Aug 10th, 2009 08:28 pm
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dwyaneward
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Thanks guys....I will update with more pics when I get back from working in Las Cruces NM.

I have the track down, wired and Turnout controls in place.

As far as a transfer table ..... I have been considering using cassette's instead.



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Dwyane Ward | Fairview, TX
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Texas & Pacific - Bonham Division in N Scale
http://kdrail.blogspot.com/
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https://www.shapeways.com/shops/kdmodels
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