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Herb Kephart
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The latest scratchbuild on the O&E is an Ingersoll-Rand oil-electric (an early name given to diesel electrics) While properly this should go in the Scratch Build forum, I've decided to keep items about the layout in one place. Since there is no O scale std gauge forum (and NO Dave, I'm not suggesting one) I am going to try to weasel my way in here with the big guys Hope that they don't notice.

The sides and ends, with rivets punched. Side and end material is .030' thick. Window mutins are .030" copper wire, run through a set of rolls to reduce the thickness to .020"--which increases the width to about .040".



Window frames and doors installed



closeup of an end. Rivets are oversize from what I usually emboss- smaller ones seem to get "lost' on a black surface



and the sides and ends soldered together.



stay tuned! If you ain't tuned---get tuned!


Herb:old dude:






W C Greene
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OK Herbie-what scale is it?  To my old eyes, it looks to be 3/8. Could it be you have been converted (perverted) to the dark side? The proper side? Yiiikes!

Since I can't find fault with your construction and the beauty of the rivets and brass dazzle my senses...Are you sure that you have the right number of rivets, others will count them since they cannot find any problems with your model. Well, I am duly impressed and will wait for more photos so i can look for nits.

       As James Cagney said-"you dirty brother, you killed my little rat!"...or something like that.       Boudreaux

 

 

PS-OK, so I know it is O standard gauge...again, I am blinded by the shiny brass. I can hope, can't I ?  

Last edited on Thu Nov 5th, 2009 09:04 pm by W C Greene

Herb Kephart
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Woodrow-

As James Cagney said-"you dirty brother, you killed my little rat!"...or something like that.

Was that an R/C rat?

Now you know that I am too deep into 1/4" scale to do much else at this late state in the game.

Occasionally I doodle SR&RL stuff in larger scales (usually 1/2) but the size of a trackplan gets to me.

And having had one outdoor railroad, I have suffered enough!

As for picknitters- I have a full size rivet gun and sets that I will apply, not so gently , to their foreheads!

Herbacide  :old dude:

Dave D
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It's already a beauty Herbie! :2t:

It might be a shame to put paint on her. :s::s::s::s:

W C Greene
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Herbie-is it done yet?  is it done yet?   is it done yet?   is it done yet?  

Lets see some more. As Hannibal Smith said-"I love it when a plan comes together"...Woodrow

Herb Kephart
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Calm down there pard!

Patience worked with your neighbor remember.

As soon as I dig some more copper ore out of the mine, and combine it with the zinc already on hand------


Herbie:old dude:  (old and slow)

W C Greene
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Herbie-patience had nothing to do with the "neighbor"...remember that wooden stake and silver bullet ?  OK OK, I will leave you alone until you melt those brass spheres down and continue soldering and riveting. What kind of drive have you decided upon? I know we talked about that, but I have been talking with Muj lately and have forgotten what was said. Maybe I will remember in 20 or so years...  Woodrow

Herb Kephart
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The drive will be the same as the old Varney diesels- a horizontal motor (in this case a largeish can) driving the wormshaft via a belt on the truck that it is mounted upon. Second truck has similar wormshaft driven from motorized truck by telescoping shaft and universal joints.

Milling axle slots



Axle and worm shafts will be mounted on .125"x.3215"x.110" ball bearings. Semi-finished truck gearboxes-



Wheels are turned, have to make axles and wormshafts.


Herbie  :old dude:

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Such energy, such moxy, give it heck Herbert! Truly the work of a mad scientist. Your photography is terrific sir. Keep showin us the progress.             Russell

W C Greene
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Herbie-you da' man. You build real stuff with real tools while the rest of us make stuff from this n' that using a couple of needle files and an Xacto #11 blade. I ain't seen this much brass since I went to Caboose Hobbies years ago! Of course, any guy who can make On30 Shay pinion gears deserves a real honor-becomming a MMR !. Yes, I am nominating you for the Monkey Model Railroader award from the National Monkey Railroad Assn. in Brazil. Of course, I hold MMR #1, so you will have to be #2...I hope that's OK with ya'.  No wait, Muj is #2, you will have to be #3.

The preceeding drivel is not ment to outrage the masters of model railroading nor the National whatchamacallit. If any are offended, just consider the source.

                             Boudreaux with Muj along with PH

Herb Kephart
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Woodrow, you sure know how to get a guy to laugh!! :2t:


DaHerb:old dude:

W C Greene
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Herb-when you mentioned a Varney diesel...guess what Muj has laying on his layout? I bet he doesn't remember that it's there, but it's an ugly yellow Varney SW switcher with the mentioned hunkus motor on one truck and a driveshaft between the two trucks. This old girl is sooooo old that the wheels & gears are frozen in place! I was (and still am) gonna get the thing running again, take it to a local HO club and burn up their dcc system with it! This Varney however, has a spur gear on the motor that drives a spur gear on the truck, no belt...but it don't much matter since it's still froze up. I digress...are you going to use a rubber belt or a spring belt? I repaired one of these old dudes years ago and used a Mamod spring belt made for their live steam engines to operate power tools via a shaft & belt system. Geez-I have jabbered too long.....                   get out your Brasso!          Woodrow

Herb Kephart
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The gearboxes for the trucks are finally finished.




All shafts run on roller bearings, and the worm/gear ratio is 37-1





Here they are all buttoned up. Motor is a Maxon coreless, and drive will be by rubber belt until I find a ratio that gives the speeds that I want, at which point I will cut a set of gears to connect the shafts.




Next will probably be the frame, which when the trucks are mounted, will allow the length of the telescoping shaft with universals to be determined



Herb  :old dude:


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This is a really meat project Herb.

W C Greene
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OK, Herb builds a beautiful set of trucks with ball bearings and immaculate machine work to go under his fantastic boxcab...the rest of us use that crappy old Varney drive and some hacked up plastic coach parts...Herbie has made me want to learn to be a master machinest just to keep up! Damn him! Just to ease my pain, I think I will go outside and play witrh my trains...Oh geeze, when I go outside, I see Herb's stuff on my layout...

The preceeding rant is not ment to be taken seriously...I don't think Herb's fragile ego can handle it. (snark, snark..)              Boudreaux

Herb Kephart
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Who the H**L is this Herb you keep yacking about--your bookie?

Herb Kephart
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Well I finally got the universal joints to work- because the space was so tight, and the distance between the trucks varied so much when they went around my sharp curves, I had to make the slip joint sprung









and as the above fuzzy pix shows- drive from the motor to the truck is by chain



Most of the chassis parts have been blackened with commercial brass blackener, a suggestion from Woodie, so that the brass does not show through on the corners when the paint wears off from handling


Herb:old dude:

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And they thought the Hoover Dam was  great engineering

Herb, you continue to amaze and befuddle.

Don

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Paladin wrote: And they thought the Hoover Dam was  great engineering

Herb, you continue to amaze and befuddle.

I couldn't have put it better myself - it's way out of my league.

It looks superb.

Regards,

Huw.

W C Greene
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Herbie-it looks like you will keep the brass producers in business for a long time! What wonderful work, the universals look like jewelery.  I don't see any wires attached to the trucks, are you going to use magic to get the electrons to the motor?

Great work, all of us would be happy to be able to do things like this. I am inspired to do something, but it won't be anything like what you have done. Here in Dallas, there's an old machineist modeler who's name gets invoked when we see stuff like yours, now instead of great modeling being called "Waffordized", I will call it "Kephartized". Now, take your gold statue home and get back to work.  Woodrow 

Herb Kephart
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Thanks for the kind words folks!  :Salute:


And to answer Woodie's question- I am going to install a very small nuclear reactor, so as to eliminate those pesky LiPo batteries.


It'll glow as well as go



Herbie:old dude:

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OOOHHHH!!!.....I wish I hadn't seen this:bang: ......a while back I was totally smitten on seeing an HO version of one of these box cabs on the Bronx Teminal link on the FastTracks site. So much so that I was contemplating doing some artwork and having the body etched in brass in O gauge , your wonderful efforts so far will have me digging out the old copy of the Model Railroader which has the drawing in, plus the photos I found on the web of the box cabs.....another project :)  Shall be watching how you are progressing :thumb:,

    

Last edited on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 10:58 am by

Huw Griffiths
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ebtm3 wrote: I am going to install a very small nuclear reactor, so as to eliminate those pesky LiPo batteries.

It'll glow as well as go

As it can't be "water cooled", should I assume this will be an AGR?

For those unfamiliar with the nuclear power industry, I'd better explain that AGRs (or Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors) are a UK design of nuclear power station, the building of which was once described as "watchmaking by the ton".

I'll let you decide whether to draw any parallels.

Regards,

Huw.

W C Greene
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Herb-if you want to replicate a nuke disaster, you just have to stick one of those li-po's with an Xacto #11 blade and run! It's a great way to get rid of a model you ain't too proud of. That just may be a way to model Chernobyl or Three Mile Island...I am sure there are some modelers thinking about that. Keep it up but when Gromit starts to run, you had better also!      Woodrow

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W C Greene wrote: It's a great way to get rid of a model you ain't too proud of.
I don't see this happening any time soon!

It's a great model - solidly built and beautifully engineered.

I don't think I was too far out with my "watchmaking by the ton" comment.

Regards,

Huw.

W C Greene
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Huw-I wasn't talking about Herb's models-I have plenty of things I have built but am not proud of. Of course, I paint rust on them, plant them in the dirt behind the enginehouse, put weeds all around...and viewers comment about all the cool junk and how I must have spent hours on all of it. Little do they know that the junk was at one time a model I had high hopes for! Uh oh..I let the cat out...     Woodie

W C Greene
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Herb-expiring minds want to know: HOW'S THE BOXCAB COMING ALONG ? I know you have had a houseful for the holidays, but it's time to get back to work and show us something.

           Happy Li-Po's and a merry ESC......            Woodrow

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Yassa yassa massa--please don't beat my old bones


Been working on forming the roof sheet- think I've got it. Now if I can get it attached without messing it up and turning it into sheet------




Herbie  :old dude:

Herb Kephart
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Started out by making an aluminum template of the end curvature, and wood piece, made to the template curve to form the brass over.



The wood was poplar



And I had quite q bit of trouble getting the brass (even though annealed) to form the eave curves the correct distance apart. After a couple tries, each getting worse, it became evident that the wood was compressing. Finally, an aluminum form block was made to replace the wood, and an acceptable roof sheet was formed.



The two things sitting on top of the engine removal hatch that look like the old vents that were used on barn roofs, are outlets for the muffler



Next major problem is how to make the two cooling pipe assemblies for each end of the roof. These are composed of a stack of transverse pipes each of which has a sharp bend near the roof edge. Two staggered rows, coming out each side of a central tank and terminating in smaller eave tanks. Gotta think about this  L:


Herbie:old dude:


Herb Kephart
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Well, my pappy useta say D****T boy do sumthin, even if it's wrong.

Following this sage advice I decided to use 16ga copper electrical wire (.050" diameter) for the cooling pipes. A block was made with grooves .070" apart, as I wanted some space between adjacent pipes in the row



The brass strips at each end are only to hold the pipes until the second layer is attached. Here the first layer are soldered to the strips



Then the second layer of pipes is nested between the ones in the first layer, and soldered. This will be the bottom layer when finished



After a good scrub with Comet cleanser and a toothbrush the top layer looks like this.



It will need a little scraping with a graver between the pipes to remove small amounts of excess solder, but so far, so good.


Herb:old dude:


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Herb,

when I first looked at this I thought now why didn't he just use plastic rod for this ........ however for once I reread the thread and noticed the "sharp bends at either end comment" yup think your way is the best  ..... will look good .

Sorry if I missed it if its there, but how do you get such consistency with your rivets ... both in spacing and depth of rivet ? 

Will be following your progress

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Gordon--

Rivets are formed with a pointed punch and a female die with a round cavity, both hardened. The punch has a spring that retracts it between hits. There is a brass "hammer" on a swinging arm to strike the punch, and a adjustable stop for how high the arm can be lifted, giving uniform blows.

A straight line is made by an adjustable fence that the rivet impressed sheet is kept up against, and spacing is done by pushing the last formed rivet against the edge of the female die.

I made the whole rig in a hurry 40 years ago--it is about as crude as it could be- but aside from making other female dies to get different size rivet heads and spacing- I'm still using it. Each time that I use it I start daydreaming about how to make it more automated, but when I'm finished using it, it gets put away with a promise of "next time" I'll take some pix, but I am really ashamed of the darn thing.


Herb  :old dude:

Herb Kephart
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Dug the rivet punch out and, as promised took some pictures. Certainly nothing to look at beauty wise. First an overall view, showing the brass hammer, the adjustable stop that ensures that the hammer is lifted the same height each time, the steel U shaped frame that keeps the punch and die in alignment, the spring that retracts the punch after the rivet is struck, and the movable table with a fence.



next two shots are of the removable bottom die in place





Finally, some extra tooling. The four pieces on right are various size dies. Note that the cavity sizes are different, but also the diameter around the cavity is a different size- this is what controls the spacing. There is one die that is triangular instead of round--giving the option of different spacings for that rivet diameter. Next in line is another punch, with a larger radius on the end, which was found not to be needed, as I have found that a relatively sharp point works on all the dies. Last item is-----AN ERASER!. It is a small diameter punch with a very, very slight radius on the end. When (NOT IF!) a mistake is made the errant rivet can be tapped down flat with this and a small hammer, and blended back into the flat sheet.



The operation is to locate the first rivet and lift the hammer and let it drop. The piece is then lifted very slightly and shifted to, say, the left and dropped back down onto the table, and then slid to the right until the just formed rivet hits against the diameter around the punch cavity, creating the space, and the operation is repeated.
It goes along at a fair pace, but is about as boring as modelmaking gets, and then suddenly you discover why there is an eraser.


Herb  :old dude:

W C Greene
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Herbie-your rivet machine which you refer to as "crude" or whatever is far, far more so-fisty-cated than the stone age stuff I use to make rivets. Maybe that's the reason I don't make rivets! Of course, my railroad is modern and doesn't use rivets to fasten parts together, the shop crew uses gas welding and likes to hide the welds so the parts appear seamless. That's my line, anyway.  I remember seeing the "prototype" for your machine in an old, old Model Railroader or maybe a Railroad Model Craftsman. Years ago, NWSL offered a riveter which looked like a small arbor press...if I had bought one back then, it would probably be gone by now anyway-thrown out or "lent" to somebody and never returned.

If (for some reason) I need some rivets, I have a small screwdriver with a pointed tip which can be "whacked" with a pair of pliers or whatever I have handy to produce a "bump" which will look fine when covered with rust and dirt. Ahhh, weathering hides all sins.

                Woodrow

Herb Kephart
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If you go back one page, you will see the "master" that I had hopes that I could make the multi-pipe cooling radiators for the IR loco. After it was all soldered, the end straps were cut off, with the pipe area still being over length. Without putting the bend in the outboard end of the master. a RTV mold was made and Cerro-Bend, which melts at 158*F was gravity poured in. The castings were then bent to the approximate radius. It was hoped that the castings would be acceptable being made this way, but if not, I was going to make a vulcanized mold, and spin cast them in a high tin alloy. RTV mold on right, next flat casting, finally bent castings. the alloy is silver colored, but the lighting makes it look like brass



The reality of this effort was that even though the castings came out poor, it was evident that they looked like corrugated roofing, and not at all like separate pipes.
Severe case of muttering and mumbling ensued. It was evident that there wasn't going to be any cheap and easy way out of the problem. Two brass blocks had been made up some time back to become the center reservoirs, and it seemed like the only way to make radiators that I was going to be happy with was to use separate wires for the pipes. Four other pieces of brass were rough shaped to the outside sizes of the eaves collector boxes, but were left over length for later fastening into an assembly jig. 234 Holes were spotted, and drilled #65 (.035") through all the pieces. This meant drilling through a total of approximately 39" of material. Before anyone has the audacity to ask if I broke any drills--#@#@ yes! What do I do when this happens? I curse! How do I get the broken off bits out of the hole? I curse even louder--works every time!



Next on the torture list is bending 158 pieces of .031" wire to two different radii.
I've made a jig for this, and have about half the pieces bent.

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LOL!

Herbie you are nothing short of a sadist!

The first attempt was a nice try...too bad.

I am positive all your efforts with the latest incarnation will be rewarded handsomely.

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Well, progress is being made. Here are the brass pieces in a wood jig, and some pipes installed-one row this side--



Both rows other side-- 



This shows the height difference between rows--the brass strip between the rows is a temporary spacer.



Removed from jig, with all pipes installed. Ends of side collection tanks that were left long for clamping will be trimmed later. This shows that the open, see through look that I wanted came out OK



The top brass piece is really straight, but the angle and closeness of the camera distorted it

One down, and one to go---

GROG, WENCH, BRING ME GROG!!!

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Herb, 
it's always a pleasure to see your pics - brass work, old school, with precision and patience. The radiator looks great so far - and I think, all those laser-etching-resin-thingys couldn't do it better.

Michael

W C Greene
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Herbie-I KNEW you could do it. What you have done looks far, far mo' better than some casting would. You owe it to this model to make the best parts you can and you have done that wonderfully. The next time I need some radiator work done, I will call upon you. When will you bless us with more photos? My breath is baited...or something...

               Woodie

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Thanks Guys!

Michael--I wouldn't try to outdo laser cut stuff--it is just amazing. I just try to make models as sturdy as possible, consistent with looking reasonably good.

Woodie--Things should go rather quickly from now on (he said, crossing his fingers, as he lied through his teeth). Foot boards, couplers, and a few other do-dads, and of course the battery and radio gear--don't leave home without it!


Herbal  :old dude:

W C Greene
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Herb-remember that if you want a first rate paint job, I personally know someone who would do it right!

                                        Woodrow

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Well- I took things in my own hands and did the paint job myself.

Woodie- i know dang well that you would have done a better job of it, but you seemed to be having too much fun with building the little layout, and I wanted to give Humbrol a try. I blackened the whole body and frame with a commercial version of Hobby-Black, sprayed and brushed (and baked) the Humbrol and it seems to be wearing off the edges from handling already. I don't think that it is as durable in that respect than baked Floquil.



The R/C fleet is now doubled in size



The Ingersol is geared to go a ballast-scorching 6.5 scale MPH. On one of it's trial runs a stink bug ran down the track ahead of it, and was in absolutly no danger of getting run over.





I see that one step on the end is cockeyed--oh well!


Herb:old dude:

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looks pretty good from where I am standing.

Like the colours.

Don

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Herb, that is one fine looking piece of MOchinery
:bow:

Bobby

W C Greene
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Fantastic Herbert!!! I just love it! I think you did a bang-up job on the paint..she looks just fine. On the Humbrol durability..I have been using the gloss Humbrol on brass stuff and when baked it is pretty good. You are right, it ain't like old lacquer Floquil but it will do for me. I used to paint brass with SPOT ON automotive lacquer but it has been banned by the EPA or maybe the DAA (dumbass assn.). When baked on brass, that old paint wouldn't rub off unless you used a knife or moto tool to mess with it.  Again, she looks nice and cool...that front step may be a little "off" but that's called character. Way to go!

                                    Woodrow

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Herb,

I think the paint job looks pretty darn good. And if it's starting to wear a bit...well, things do that in the real world.

As to the step...

Everytime I take a picture of my stuff and post it for all the world to see and critique, I see more wrong with it than anyone else. Either that or the folks on this forum are just really nice guys.

Like Woodie said, character.

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Thanks guys!

Before the paint, I gave everything the twice- over, and never noticed the step, until I posted the pix.

I know that it has happened many times before, to others--but DANG!


Herbie :dope:

teetrix
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Herb,

she's really a beauty, especially the radiators and the equally riveting are adding a lot of character.  Just my cup of tea... :thumb::thumb::thumb:

Michael

Last edited on Wed Apr 7th, 2010 11:48 am by teetrix

Dave D
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Cockeyed step?  I don't see no stinkin cockeyed step, I see a beautiful loco Herbie.

Sweet!:2t:

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Outstanding work Sir!!  Great to see the action shots of the machining process. I couldn't find the details on the chain drive, did I miss that?

Herb Kephart
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Figuring that it was about time that I posted some pictures, after giving the Super Moderator a poke in the ribs about not showing us the progress on his new layout, I hereby submit the following for your amusement.

I have always wanted to build a model of a barn with the "Mail Pouch" sign painted on it. These barn advertisements were all over the state of Pennsylvania, and were periodically repainted to keep them looking good. For the "use' of the barn, the farmer was paid in either cash, a repaint job on the rest of the barn, or in tobacco, but when the ban on tobacco advertising was made law, the last of the barn painters retired. Some of the signs are still visible along the roads of the state- but as barns disappear from the roadside scene, the advertisements are becoming more and more rare.

Albert Falfa had a farm near Midden, but when the O&E came along and moved the road in front of the farm, Al found himself living on a road that no longer went anywhere  The tobacco company was no longer interested in Al's barn, because of the very limited exposure that the advertisement now had. Al was devastated- his endless supply of free chawin terbaccy was cut off, and life just wernt worth livin anymore. Al's gone now, his barn still stands, but it's showing signs of the weather, and might not be around much longer either.



Al's car is still in the lean-to shed--his kids didn't want it--or the barn either



The shed roof partially collapsed from the weight of that big snow we had three winters ago-



One of the last things that Al did before he died, was to replace a couple siding boards on the old barn.





Herb :old dude:

Last edited on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 05:39 pm by Herb Kephart

Dwayne
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Nice! I still see the Mail Pouch ads on barns scattered around the country. One I know of is along I-76 east of the Allegheny Tunnel there in Pa. Arkansas, Missouri and Kentucky also have examples. Every once in a while I'll have a load that takes me out onto the backroads and I'll discover other similarly painted barns.

W C Greene
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Herbie-that barn is beautiful in it's funkiness! The Mail Pouch sign looks great, just right. All you need now is a Rainbo bread screen door somewhere, I know where there are some extra decals which would work in O scale. Do you have a farm house for this scene? Befuddled minds....know...

                         Woodie

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How about a See Rock City sign on the other side and a couple of Burma Shave signs along the road???  Memories!

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Thanks, guys!

Rainbow and Rock City signs I don't remember, but Burma-Shave--you bet!

I love the old "ghost" signs, faded, on the side of buildings.

There is a sign on the side of a brick building in Downingtown PA, that says

HYDRAULIC
GASOLENE (sic)
STORAGE

Now the storage part is easy- in the early days people with cars that lived in towns, and did not have a garage at their home, often kept their cars. in large "public" garages. There, their vehicles were out of the rain and snow, could be serviced by the attendant, and kept warm (relatively) in the winter.

But how many of you know what "hydraulic gasolene" means?

Hint- it was not only a potential car problem, but Al Gore would have been all over it.


Herb :old dude:

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Here is a link to the Rock City (Chattanooga, TN) website with several prints of the See Rock City barns

http://seerockcity.biz/rockcitybarnprints.aspx




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Guess I'm too much of a homeboy- never remember seeing one.

One series of iconic signs that I do remember from a motorcycle trip to the Daytona Races down old US 301 (befrore I-95) in the mid '50's was--

STUCKIES

It was "only 23 miles to stuckies" only "22 miles to nstuckies", "only 21 miles to stuckies---ad nauseum.


When you got there, the interior was so arranged that to get to the "food" one had to travel down endless isles lined with worthless tourist crap that was for sale---the "food" was even worse----


Herb :old dude:

dmunseyjr
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Except for their Pecan Logs.  Mom & Dad had to buy them in self-defense!

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OK Herb, maybe you have never seen a Rainbo screen door, but surely there is some localized ad that could be on a screen door somewhere up there..even if you don't want to put it on a building, it could be a neat piece of junk alongside the barn.

Here in the Republic of Tejas, we have "roadside art" along every old road. If I had a long enough road, I would do some Burma Shave signs. Also, most every old sign has been shot at with 00 buckshot so there's more "detail" to be added.

                           Woodrow

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Now that's scratch building. Making your own rolling stock is one thing but making the drive unit is a whole nother world. Good work and please show how ya do it to the end.  pete

Oops! It's already the end. Beautiful job Herb. I musta missed a few pages of the build.  PM

Last edited on Wed Sep 1st, 2010 08:49 am by norgale

W C Greene
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Herb is the master, his work inspires me to carry on with my insignificant BS. Thanks to Mr Kephart, my 2 beloved Shays have pinion gears which will never wear out.

                    Woodie

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Hi Herb

Nice going on the locy.
Don't think you'll ever get the auto in the barn goin' though !

Cheers

Si.

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Thanks Si!

I intend giving the car a little more color, enough that it stands out a little bit better in the gloom of the shed, yet still looks rusty and neglected.

As for never getting it running---well here is a little off topic--which we don't worry about much here----

This followed me home some years back



Just over a year later



so never say never!


Herb 

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Herb...:old dude:...:brill:



:bow::bow::bow::bow::bow:



Si...  :dope:




I'm going for a...  :java:

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Thank you sir!


Herb 

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my brother was building a '28 "a" and was painting the frame with the best auto paint he could get and added hardner he got a coule of runs and he said he had to use explosives to remove the paint

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Herb 

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Herb

Being a motor mechanic in the way distant past I must say that that restoration is beatifull. May I ask what model it is.


Rod.

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Thanks Rod

It's a '28 AB Capitol Chevrolet--last year for the 4 cylinder engine, first year for 4 wheel brakes.

Looks stock from outside, but has Isuzu 2.2 diesel engine with Eaton supercharger, Volvo 4 speed with overdrive transmission, and Nissan pickup rear. Aside from upholstery, all my work. Worst part was peeling all the sheet metal off the body to replace all the wood framing (most rotten) and then tacking all the body panels back on. Could have done 2 1/2 Fords in the same amount of time.


Herb 

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I've actually seen this little jewel and, believe me, it looks as good close up as it does in the pictures!  Great job, Herb.  :bow:

xxxxxxxxxxxx Bob xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

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Thank you Bob!

Herb 

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Herb,

Just quickly went through this thread looking at the pictures of that box cab. Wonderful job. I've got 3 plastic ones. I'd love to build one in brass though. Now that I've got my soldring rig built I guess I could add it to my long list of projects.

Bernd

Herb Kephart
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Thanks!

And you will send us pictures when you do---right?


Herb 

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And you will send us pictures when you do---right?
Ah, ya, OK. :us:

Bernd

 

Last edited on Wed Aug 29th, 2012 01:12 pm by Bernd

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Superb modelling Herb.

My apologies for missing this thread until now.

Peter M

Herb Kephart
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Many thanks, Bernd and Peter!

I have to get back to work on the scenery.

Being retired for 14 years seems to have major effect on the length of days- each year there is one less hour available.

Little concerned what will happen when the number goes negative---


Herb 


W C Greene
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Herb-why not try a "scale clock" but instead of letting time fly, fix it so time goes s l o w e r...Works for me...

Boudreaux

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Darn fine work!

What do you use to emboss the rivets?

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Ray-

http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=2418&forum_id=50&page=4

The 32nd and 33rd post.

Herb 

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Ray...
...I can't believe you've never heard of...
...The legendary...

' Herb 'O' Rivet ' TM

All Woodie's loco's would be shedding metal-work, along the whole length of the Mogollon main-line without it.
( I suspect the Brownhoist wouldn't exist either )

Long live the ' Herb 'O' Rivet '

Si.

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Now Si

Just because I sold you a lot of stock in the Herb-O Rivet Enterprise (company sounds SO mundane), don't think that it's value will go up the more you mention it.

Herb--Exalted President 

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Excellent work on the Ingersoll-Rand and the Chevy.
I hope to see more of the layout too.

regards
Bob Comerford

Si.
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Hi Herb :wave:


How are things along the Octoraro & Eastern ?


:moose:


Si.

W C Greene
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Si, I just looked back at the old posts with photos of Herb's beautiful work and...and...photos$^t has deleted his photos. Those cheap-ass pieces of s%^t!

Who knows where PB is located, I know guys who like to break legs and heads!
Woodie



Look what I found in Herb's gallery!

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Oh $4!7

I see that Woodie.

I have some of Herbies photos in my collection.





I think this photo was taken at 1:41 pm ...

... unless Herb forgot to wind up the clock that day ? ...

... or was allowed to stay up late ! ;)


:old dude:


Si.

Herb Kephart
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Si
Not to disturb your time /space reasoning, but there are TWO 1:41's each day (Q.E.D.)!!!

Small loco is scratch built, brass, with K&D #1 motor (how many remember them? )
Modeled from plans of the H&F switchers it had poles for many years, but when I decided to go to all pantographs, it got one (also scratch).

'Erb

W C Greene
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Herbie, I remember K&D, brass, and scratch built! I own several Lindsay (marimba them?)motors. Who out here knows where they come from?

Troublemaker

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Wow, those are some TIGHT reverse curves. What's the radius on those, Herb? Very cool!

Is there a photo of the loco at the front of that train on that picture Si posted?

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Hi Dan

That pix was part of a test just to see if it could be done. The curve is 12 or 12 1/2 inch radius. After I pulled the train around the loop, a friend said "bet you can't push it back." So, as most of the brown bottles were empty by then-and it was after one in the morning--I very cautiously reversed and slowly backed around the curve. With on board batteries, and RC, I never seems to have the higgles and jiggles that a wheel running over that last microscopic bit of dirt on the rail can cause. Now all this was to prove to Mr Greene that a certain opinion of his, was, as the Brits would say, rubbish. I wont embarrass a good friend by going into the subject matter again, he is busy with his new layout, which has to be at least half finished by now, with the speed that he fills scenic area with track. Amazing man.

Where was I? Oh yes, the curve. The ultimate use of this loop will be only to reverse the electric pantograph equipped passenger cars--for those it is wholly appropriate and prototype. Lacawanna & Wyoming Valley (the Laurel Line) had one like this at both it's end terminals.

Work is progressing (?) at both the end termini, but I'm like a garden slug at a drag race anymore, so don't dust off your 5x7 Speed Graphics. When enough transpires to make a difference, I will post.

H           e           r        b  (that slow)

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my brother just bought a rolliflex 35mm camera made in 1955 for $27 with leather case in good shape and wants to take some pictures

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Dan-

I forgot that you wanted pictures. Took a while to find my crayons---


Attachment: rdg 0-4-0 004c.jpg (Downloaded 54 times)

Si.
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" most of the brown bottles were empty by then - and it was after one in the morning "



Hi Herbie :wave:



I can see the need for a prominent layout room clock ! :time:


Dusting off my ol' Speed Graphic as we speak. ;)


Tight rads. ... Trolley heaven ! ... YEAH back those darn boxes around as well !! :P



:shocked:



Si.

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Love the camelback, Herb.

Those 12" curves are awesome. :)

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Beautiful camelback model!!!

Does anyone know what the compelling reason was for some railroads to use camelbacks?  Just seams to be an unusual design. 

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The anthracite(?) coal used caused a large firebox (more coal was needed) which caused the cab to be even wider or moved further along the boiler. If I was assigned to a camelback loco, I would surely want to be shoveling coal rather than sitting above the rods which sometimes broke and "cleaned house".
I think this is the right answer, isn't it Herbert?
Woodie

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Correct, Woodie.

Anthracite coal requires a much larger grate--Hence wider boiler.
While breakage of rods didn't occur all that often, I wouldn't want to be "up close and personal" either. The FRA (I think it was)--decreed that no new locos of that design be built after 1935, principally because of the large separation of fireman and engineer. One could drop dead without the other knowing. Since some of the Eastern railroads had anthracite mines for customers- or were outright owners of coal companies, it made sense to burn the stuff. It did  burn much cleaner.

Said Phoebie Snow,
about to go
  upon a trip to Buffalo,
My dress stays white,
from morn  to night,
while on the route of anthracite

And Thanks guys, for the kudos!

Herb

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Hi Herbie :old dude:



Is that Bod Dylan ? ;)

Or is this poetic posting one of H.K.s many talents ? ???



I just totally LOVE that AWESOME loco ! :)

I dunno ? ... Have I seen a narrow gauge camelback ?

Possibly, possibly not ... But my imagination WANTS ONE ! :cool:



Might have seen an On30 BASHed Mogul version once, I'm thinkin' ? L:



:moose::moose::moose::moose::moose:tastic !



Si.

Herb Kephart
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Don't know that there ever was one Si, But Wolfie could be a pioneer-----

'Erb

And Phobie was part of a Lackawana ( Help Woodie, was it D&LW ?)  advertising pamphlet
There was 3 or 4 more verses. Before Dylan's time. Heck, even before my time.

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Yep, the D&LW. Long before Robert Zimmerman (Bob D), Phobie Snow was the "mascot"for the road's advertising. She was a classy gal for sure.

Woodie


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