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Recomended book
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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2012 09:54 am
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wclm
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Herb
   You are the man!!!!!!!:glad:If I had known or even thought to look the plans up, I might have found that website. What a treasure trove of info. You are correct, in that these are the plans I was writing about. The only problem is that now I will be cruising another site for stuff. Not just stuff, but great stuff. If anyone has access and the time I would highly recommend a look at the site. :apl::apl::apl::apl::apl::apl:
                                     
                                                    Clif K



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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2012 10:20 am
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Herb Kephart
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Yes, and for the most parts the drawings are excellent.

I think that the structure plans can be relied on to be accurate, because they were verified (as far as I know)
when the various teams visited the properties.

I have copies of the EBT shop complex drawings, and there are some errors in the identification of some of the internal pieces. This was not caused by the people who did the drawings,- they relied on the then general manager to identify various pieces of machinery, instead of someone who knew machinery. In the machine shop, the 14" Steptoe shaper is identified as  "metal cutting machine"

Everything in there is a d**n metal cutting machine.


Herb 



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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2012 02:21 pm
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W C Greene
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Now, here's another great book-UINTAH RAILWAY by Bender. You Colorado narrow gauge guys who want something a bit different would really appreciate this book. One of my favorites, this tells about the Uintah which ran from the NW part of Colorado up into Utah and hauled Gilsonite, a dark brown mineral used for asphalt, insulation, and even the black lacquer used on Model T's. Matter of fact, Gilsonite is only found in the area where the railroad ran. Over the years, the URy had motive power as diverse as a 2-4-2t, Shays, inside frame 2-8-2's, and the only 2 narrow gauge articulateds used in the US. The rolling stock was also quite diverse, from passenger cars to gons and boxes to cabooses-one of which was a 4 wheel bobber that makes a neat model. If you want a good read and dandy photos, you can't beat this one. And copies are rather cheap these days.

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?an=bender&sts=t&tn=uintah+railway

Even if you are not modeling Colorado NG, you will find some great ideas in this one and those who believe you need wide curves to look "prototype" might better not look here.

Woodie



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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2012 03:29 pm
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mwiz64
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I use to like the Uintah myself simply because they did have those mallets. As I recall they went to the Sumpter Valley RR in Oregon then and eventually ended up somewhere in Central America. Always wondered why these weren't the ones Bachmann modeled their offerings after.

I think I have a book on the Uintah from back when I was a young man. I'll have to go to the book box in the attic and see if it's the same one.

Mike

Last edited on Tue Aug 28th, 2012 03:33 pm by mwiz64



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 Posted: Sat Sep 15th, 2012 04:10 pm
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Ray Dunakin
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I just came across a very interesting reference resource, thanks to a link on a French modeling forum. This site has several digitized books by Walter Gilman Berg, which feature plans and info about railroad structures:

http://archive.org/search.php?query=walter%20gilman%20berg

One of the books is titled, "Buildings and Structures of American Railroads", and is a reference book for railroad managers, superintendents, architects, etc.

There is also a similar book on American railway bridges and structures, and another on railway shop systems.

They can all be viewed online, downloaded to an ebook, or downloaded as a pdf.



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 Posted: Sun Sep 23rd, 2012 11:58 am
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W C Greene
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I mentioned the following books in the earlier thread which got vaporized into internet hell but once again, here are some of my favorites. Why some? The great author David F. Myrick published a multitude (whatta word) of books on the US Southwest: Railroads of Nevada, vol 1 & 2. Railroads of Arizona, vol 1 through 6. Railroads of New Mexico. And many others with both railroad and non railroad themes. If your interests run to history and railroads of this area, then you might want to buy, borrow, or see if the local library has them. Photos? There are many in all his books. Words? The man was a historian and writes in a very "readable" style.  Now, these ain't gonna be cheap, they are well worth the money it takes to own them and you will be able to talk about, think about, and MODEL these wonderful railroads without risking being shot at by the armchair pit-nickers! DAVID F. MYRICK-remember that name if you want solid info about wonderful railroads.

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?an=david+f+myrick&sts=t

Check them out, I give them a 10 and a beat that you can dance to!

Woodie



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 Posted: Fri Oct 5th, 2012 02:38 pm
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lpn9
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I too have found many books from the same site that Ray found

http://archive.org

If you search for "railroad" and select "all media types".... be prepared to fill up your hard drive.

I have grabbed many books to help in my design stages...and those for help in kit-bashing and scratch-building.

There are a few Car Builders Dictionary (different issues), many handbooks and field books for the railway engineers, there are a few magazines too (American Engineer, Railway Age, Railway Mechanic) and a 9 volume "Cyclopedia" on Civil engineering for the railway. There are a couple of books on Railway Structures, one on building them and one on their cost estimations. All interesting scale drawings that might be used on our layouts.



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 Posted: Mon Oct 8th, 2012 04:14 pm
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W C Greene
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LITTLE RAILWAYS OF THE WORLD by Fredric Shaw. A wonderful little book, I could only find one available from Abe Books: http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?kn=little+railways+of+the+world&sts=t&x=58&y=11

Page down and you can find it. If you are modeling Gn15, this is for you because it has a chapter on the Romney, Hythe, & Dymchurch, a great British 15" gauge line which weathered WW2 and was used for troop movements and is still operating. Also the Overfair Ry, built for the San Francisco Exposition in 1918 and was a 18" gauge "common carrier". More? How about the Wisconsin Dells, Centerville & SW, Wabash, Frisco & Pacific. All these are "minimum gauge" lines. Then there's the old Festiniog RR, the Talyllyn RR, and the Gilpin Tram...plus a bit about my favorite, SCPA&M. And lots, lots more. Many photos and even some great plans drawn by Mr. Shaw, a great architect and draftsman. I have loved this little book since I was a kid, it and Beebe & Clegg made me want to model narrow gauge. Find a copy or rent one if the library has one, you will just drool all over it!

Woodie



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 Posted: Wed Oct 10th, 2012 12:37 pm
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wclm
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Hey Woodie
 A little out of the realm, but two great books. "The Iron Sherpa" by T. Martin. It works well if your trying to do Gn15. The system would fit. Second is just a great book, Southern Pacifics Sacramento Shops. By R Pecotich. What an operation. Hard to imagine the work force that was there. Both books are pricey to say the least. Another book that I don't recall if it was posted is Robert Sloan's "DRGW + 10".
If your a DRGW fan this is a real great one for info. The drawings and text on each type of car is outstanding. Great reference  if your trying to do a presentable looking piece for the DRGW.

                                                                                     Clif K



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 Posted: Wed Oct 10th, 2012 01:46 pm
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W C Greene
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Clif-interesting that you mention Robert Sloan, he and Carl Skowronski authored THE RAINBOW ROUTE, a wonderful book about the Silverton RR and the other railroads around Silverton, the SN, SG&N, and the mines and mills they served. This book has been around many years and prices range from fairly reasonable to ???

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?an=sloan%2Fskowronski&sts=t&tn=the+rainbow+route

If you are a lover of narrow gauge, Silverton, high mountain passes, and incredible scenery, this is for you. This book was published by Sundance and is typical in being first rate, pirined on high quality paper, and even has a clear plastic dust cover which is still intact after over 30 years. My copy was left to me by my late buddy Steve Beck and has an inscrfiption to him by Dr. Sloan. Nope, it ain't for sale! What is in this book that's so cool? Hundreds of historic photos, then and now photos, even plans for locos, cars, and structures. Find a copy of this one if you love the most famous narrow gauge of them all! (my opinion)...



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