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Herbert
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 Posted: Wed Jan 6th, 2010 09:38 pm
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W C Greene
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Wonderful news! I knew you would get it figured out. Not knowing what type of transmitter you have, it might be possible to get even finer speed control by using the "trim" on the throttle. Of course, what I am thinking about may be ancient technology. The trim is sort of a fine tuning capability on older transmitters to get optimum performance from motors or servos. It appears you are using a 3 volt camera battery in the loco, you might get better response with more voltage. Again, not knowing about the system you are using this may be unneeded advice. A great small Lithium-Polymer battery is made by TEAM LOSI, 7.4 volts, and would fit into your loco. This company makes the battery along with a small charger and is available from most r/c suppliers. If you are interested, you might check it out.

Now it seems that you are "hooked" on wireless operation, you won't be sorry. Please keep us posted on the progress.             Woodie



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 Posted: Thu Jan 7th, 2010 07:41 am
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scratchbuilt
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Hi Woodie,

Your right, I use a 3V batterie and that is a bit poor.

I use this ecs: http://store.sol-expert-group.de/1zu87modellbau/FM-Bauteile/Fahrregler-fuer-FM/Fahrregler-ER100::622.html .

It handles no more than 5,5 Volts. I can use a 7,2V Lipo but will have to cut it down to max 5V like "Troeffelholm" once explained here:  ".........a 5V low drop regulator and a 100uF capacitor........" Or I use 4 1,2 V cells. This might improve performance. 

Albert

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 Posted: Sat Jan 16th, 2010 11:47 am
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scratchbuilt
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Hi all,

My little Herbert is doing fine now, although I haven't finished it.  It runs like it should after I changed a 'gear-wheel'. (Don't know the english word.L:) I find myself playing a lot with Herbert, neglecting the other loco's. Then I thought: lets play them together! Didn't work, the trackpowerloco's made my little Herbert go mad. Radiodisturbance or so....  Then I thought I try again finding a way to change the other locs, with the funny shaped chassis with lots of iron, to RC-drive. In a German forum I found a guy, Martin, who just did it! http://www.kostenloses-forum.com/board/waldbahnlok-ferngesteuert-,nxu,01642644nx1878,t,2854,start,10.html  (scroll down a bit) So, there is hope!:glad:

While enjoying Herbert I thought it would be nice to park it somewhere out of reach and still be able to switch it off. Mr. Martin wrote he maybe will try this with a reed-contact or magnet-switch. Has anyone tried this before and did it work?

Albert.

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 Posted: Sun Jan 17th, 2010 03:14 pm
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W C Greene
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Howdy Albert. I don't know why your loco "goes crazy" on track power...unless you have pickups installed on it and there is some sort of feedback through the board. All my r/c locos operate well on DC and DCC layouts (even when those layouts are not operating due to wiring problems). You might try some small capacators across the motor brushes to nix any interference. Someone else needs to advise as to these, I have 2 locos with the caps and they got rid of small problems.  I have no pickups for track power on my locos, I believe that's why everything works. As for the reed switches, a magnetic on/off switch can be connected in line with a battery to board wire (negative) and the loco can be switched on & off easily. The switch needs to be placed correctly to operate right. Keep us posted.        Woodie



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 Posted: Sun Jan 24th, 2010 07:05 pm
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scratchbuilt
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Hi all,

Now really Woodie, pickups on Herbert? Please............. :)

I'v tried and changed everything, channels, sticks, wiring..... It runs fine now for 95%. It might be the engine or the sender, it might be the tubelight at the sealing of my hobby room, I don't know. I leave the technics for what they are, I give up on the last 5%...

But there is more:

The esc has moved into the receivers casing.... (should I take on production and sell them as plug and play ecs-receiver?)



I drive LIPO's .....



I've tried belt drive, didn't work. Also tried glue on the wheels for better grip, no succes. I get to that later. I've added a loading dock for the lipo. When switch is 'off' Herbert is ready for charging, when switch is 'on' Herbert is raedy to roll and can not be charged....



Unless heaven comes down I'll work on Herbert's looks further... Reedswitches not for Herbert, maybe on other projects.

Albert

 

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 Posted: Sun Jan 24th, 2010 09:20 pm
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W C Greene
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Albert-nice looking...on powering the other axle, check out GRANDT LINE's line of small sprockets and chain. There are many small locos using these parts and run great. You also might try to find some MAMOD spring belt material, used for their live steam engines to run "power tools" with. The spring would work on the pulleys you have now. How does she pull with one axle?        Woodie



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 Posted: Mon Jan 25th, 2010 09:15 pm
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scratchbuilt
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Woodie, the spring (or the belt I used) was not the problem. It was Herbert's frame itself. It is not rigid enough to prevent the belt pulling both axels towards eachother, and that on one side off the center. Making the belt less tide (longer) had no effect, it would just slip. I would need a more rigid frame, better bearings, and so on, and so on. That all is for a second RC loc, 'Herbert II'. Herbert is not the goal, Herbert is the path..........

You once (twice?) learned us all that a poor running chassis will stay poor running even with batteries and rc. That is why I would like to use an existing good running chassis and rebuilt it to rc. Herbert can become a 'critter' or a 'railtruck'. Or I can leave it as it is and live with it (after all it can pull and push a few cars), and just finish the looks.

More to come,

Albert

Last edited on Mon Jan 25th, 2010 09:19 pm by scratchbuilt

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 Posted: Mon Jan 25th, 2010 11:24 pm
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W C Greene
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Albert-now I understand about the belt slipping. Here's a high tech thing you may try in the future for making a sturdy frame without soldering. Find some carbon fiber sheets of the proper thickness, it ain't cheap but it will be as rigid as any brass frame. You can use CA or epoxy to glue the parts together and as tough as the cf is, you shouldn't ever need any bearings, etc. because the material wears like steel! A model plane friend "turned me on" to this and I am duly impressed. A plate frame can be made rather easily and even details could be made with careful work. The only problem I see is that when you file or motor tool the cf, the dust is VERY VERY BAD! Do not breathe it or get it into your eyes! But then working with brass, etc. is the same thing just about. Thought I would throw this out, if I was to be building a new loco, I would probably try this.           Woodie



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 Posted: Tue Jan 26th, 2010 11:47 am
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Huw Griffiths
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W C Greene wrote: Find some carbon fiber sheets of the proper thickness, it ain't cheap but it will be as rigid as any brass frame. You can use CA or epoxy to glue the parts together and as tough as the cf is, you shouldn't ever need any bearings, etc. because the material wears like steel!A plate frame can be made rather easily and even details could be made with careful work. The only problem I see is that when you file or motor tool the cf, the dust is VERY VERY BAD! Do not breathe it or get it into your eyes!

In my last job, I frequently worked with carbon fibre sheet, amongst other things. Based on this experience, I would definitely echo Woodie's warnings about working with the stuff. In fact, I'd go further.

I was a "labrat", doing instrumentation in a university civil engineering department. A lot of my job was about installing strain gauges on test specimens - and teaching students how to do this work for themselves. A number of students and postgrads were doing experiments, to see if carbon fibre sheet could be used to reinforce damaged bridges - so I found myself fitting a lot of gauges to the stuff.

I agree the stuff is very strong and rigid - and probably self lubricating - it's also very cold to the touch, just like a lot of metals - but there the similarities end.

When you install strain gauges, you have to ensure that the gauge can't detatch itself from the specimen surface - with carbon fibre, this means abrading a shiny surface which is brittle, yet as hard as many of the abrasives you're trying to use. In desperation, one student just tried throwing superglue at the surface - this usually worked.

Abrading this stuff was one thing - cutting it was quite another. Carbon fibres are a bit like glass - very hard, very strong, but brittle - this is why I normally encountered it in sheets, about 2 millimetres thick. I wouldn't be surprised if the fibres were actually used as a matrix, embedded in epoxy resin and rolled flat under pressure before the resin cured - but I never saw how it was produced. All I do know is that it could only be cut cleanly using an industrial guillotine.

Perhaps I should qualify the words "cut cleanly" - I'd often find dust and splinters along the edges of the strips (or rolls) as supplied by the manufacturers - I quickly learnt to avoid these edges.

You know what often happens when you use a fibreglass pencil - dust gets everywhere (especially your hands and face, leaving them sore and itchy for days after) - fibres spear into your fingers (and you can't get the stuff out).

Wait till you try carbon fibres - then you'll know what real splinters are like. An unforgettable experience - that is a promise.

The really frustrating thing about both glass and carbon fibres is that they seem to find their way through a lot of personal protective equipment - carbon fibres also seem to be very efficient glove shredders (they work great on the plastic gloves labrats use when working on specimens).

Anyway, you now know why I hate carbon fibre with a vengeance. It's strong stuff - and it looks really nice - but it's evil to work with (and I'm not sure how well it would take paint).

That's my opinion on the stuff. If you choose to use the stuff, then good luck - just take care, that's all!

Regards,

Huw.

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 Posted: Wed Jan 27th, 2010 03:24 pm
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W C Greene
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Huw-I wasn't trying to get someone to use something dangerous!  Most all my model airplane builder friends make stuff from carbon fiber and they swear by it. Sure, you have to observe proper safety procedures to work with it..most stuff modelers use needs some safety procedures. You can make your own by using what is called carbon fiber tow-looks like fine threads-and lay that into epoxy or other resin. The guys I know use industrial epoxies, not the cheap stuff from the hobby shop. When done properly, it is hard as h#$$ and for something like a locomotive frame, it would probably be fine. Well, I don't use it but I know many who do, so this is just my uninformed opinion. I hope I am not endangering anyone with errant radio control waves wafting through the air..that will cook a brain for sure!      Woodie



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