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Radio Control Components & Size Information
 Moderated by: W C Greene Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  ...  Next Page Last Page  
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 Posted: Mon Jul 18th, 2011 10:06 pm
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scratchbuilt
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What about this one:

http://www.micronradiocontrol.co.uk/rx_dt.html

For the well known Spectrum radio's, 2,4Ghz, fits under your thumb.

Albert

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 Posted: Mon Jul 18th, 2011 10:45 pm
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W C Greene
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Yes, they are indeed small but if you read the info, they are all made for aircraft. Model planes don't have reverse. You would then need a reversible ESC to operate a locomotive. Something to ponder. Also, a transmitter made for aircraft has no throttle reverse option unless you use the alerons/rudder/elevator controls.
Woodie



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 Posted: Tue Jul 19th, 2011 11:14 am
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Toeffelholm
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Genious little things Albert, thank you for that link.

It's a pity that the esc function is without reverse, as Woodie already said.

Ok, it is not a big problem to use them despite this fact, but you need additional components in the loco. A Relay for reversing polarity and an elektronic RC-swich that triggers the relay.

Thats's shrinks the benefit of the small size again.


Juergen

Last edited on Tue Jul 19th, 2011 12:14 pm by Toeffelholm



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modelling in 1:22.5 on 32mm and 16.5mm track
Actual project: 7/8" scale on 45 mm track
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 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2011 05:23 pm
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scratchbuilt
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I'm afraid I don't get it. Why should any ordinary, for instance, Spectrum receiver work with cars (loco's) (with the right esc that is) and this little ones not. L: 

And, very disturbing, how do I know if the receiver of my choise will work for my loco?

Albert

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 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2011 06:19 pm
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Toeffelholm
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Albert, that does not depend on the receiver.

Regardless of what you want to control, a servo, a motor esc fw or fw/bw, a rc switch ... you can do with every receiver that works with your transmitter.

Also the ones in your link can be used for everything. But additionally to "normal" receivers they have a motor control unit "on board", and if you want to use this, it will only work single direction.
If you hook an external fw/bw esc to this, this receiver/esc combinition will simply work as "normal" receiver and you only have no benefit from the implemented esc.

So concerning their size, they are nevertheless very interesting.

Juergen

Last edited on Thu Jul 21st, 2011 06:24 pm by Toeffelholm



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Actual project: 7/8" scale on 45 mm track
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 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2011 06:25 pm
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W C Greene
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Albert-it seems that these tiny receivers are made for aircraft only, no reverse. You would need a reversing electronic speed control to work in a locomotive. That and other devices would end up taking as much room in the loco as a single r/c car or boat board and more wiring to hook it all up. Also, a transmitter made for aircraft has no reverse capability on the throttle stick. An r/c car or boat transmitter would have a center off and work forward and reverse with the single stick (or trigger on a car transmitter).  Transmitters like the Stanton product have proper forward/reverse controls but it can only be used with their receivers. I do not know what is available outside the US, and equipment made "overseas" is not available in the US. What does all this mean? I got into r/c because of the simplicity-2 wires to the motor, 2 wires to the battery, 1 antenna wire, and it works. I use r/c car equipment and it is as simple as I described. The hardest part of installation is finding the space to install a battery and that can be done in most HO and certainly all On30 locomotives. I hope this explains some things.

                        Woodie



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 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2011 08:39 pm
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Toeffelholm
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Woodie,

the throttle stick on a transmitter originally used for planes is not for one direction use only. It just depends on the esc you are using.
I'm using plane transmitter and plane esc's.

Imagine you have a receiver with, e.g. as usual for plane-receiver, 5 or 6 connection possibilities (channels)


and you have a fw/bw esc normally used for a boat or car and a motor of course.

Then you plug the esc to the channel at the receiver that is called "THR" (throttle) and you put the "throttle" stick on your transmitter in ca. miiddle position.

Switching on the battery connections of transmitter and receiver now, the esc gets a signal from the transmitter and recognizes the given stick position as "zero position" . So now, moving the throttle stick forward the motor turns in one directiion und moving it backward it turns the other way around.

A model pilot using the same receiver and the same transmitter but a single direction esc in his plane, will put the throttel stick completely backwards before switching on plane and transmitter. The esc recognizes this a zero position and then motor velocity is spreaded over the whole way of the stick from backward to forward.


Ha, you may say, but the throttle stick is not spring-suspended an for that not automatically centered to the middle position. That's right and for that reason I do not use the throttle "channel" on the receiver.

The proportional channels are called throttle, aileron, rudder and elevation, as transmitter and receiver in the given example are normally used for planes. But these are only names, not more. The signal provided from each of this channels is basically the same and is also the same on transmitters and single receivers sold for use with cars or boats.

So, the proportional channels a interchangeable and I can plug my fw/bw esc to any channel at the receiver I want. I personally use the "elevation" channel, that is controlled by the forward/backward movement of the right stick on my transmitter and that is spring-suspended (As all stick-movements are spring suspended on a plane transmitter except "throttle").



So, - only in principle - I could plug four esc's in four locos on the four different proportional channel positions on four receivers, and with my both thumbs on the two sticks I could control four locos independently at the same time. :moose: :moose:

I could explain the electronical basics of this as well, but I don't want you to go and get out your baseball bat :):)

Though, you are far away from me, so perhaps I try :) L:

Juergen

Last edited on Thu Jul 21st, 2011 08:46 pm by Toeffelholm



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modelling in 1:22.5 on 32mm and 16.5mm track
Actual project: 7/8" scale on 45 mm track
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 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2011 11:09 pm
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W C Greene
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It's OK. But remember that I have antique equipment that were mostly given to me by r/c guys who "upgraded". I have become used to the "old ways" but have no problems with new stuff. I just want to see this hobby progress rather than stay in the last century as it seems to be. These days, I can't afford the latest gear so I have to "make do" with what I own. This thread has gone far beyond what I thought it would become and we have just begun the "experiment".
Woodie



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 Posted: Fri Jul 22nd, 2011 07:34 am
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Toeffelholm
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Woodie,

the things I tried to explain above, are valid for recent or older stuff as well.

Basically we two use the same old technic, as it has not changed in the RC car/boat/plane market over all the years. Only the way transmitter and receiver talk with each other is different, the common 40Mhz system in your case and 2,4Ghz in my case.

Each esc, sevo or other RC-circuit I can plug to my 2,4 Ghz receiver you can plug as well on a 27 Mhz receiver that fits to your transmitter and will act in the same way on the transmitter stick movement.

So if you would buy yourself a basic 2,4 Ghz system, you would get nothing new except for a securer signal transmitting. There are Guys that don't want to give away their old beloved transmitter and just change the frequency generating HF-part to 2,4Ghz, that can be bought as single part, and change the receivers in their vehicles. And then they have a 2,4 Ghz system.

The transmitter shown in the picture in the post above is a spektrum Dx6i and is a kind of computer-transmitter with display, that, in the same line, would be also available for 40Mhz. It just gives you a bunch of setting possibilities for the different channels. But, I have found that I do not really need this, and for that a basic Dx5e system (without display) would be absolutely sufficient.


Juergen

Last edited on Fri Jul 22nd, 2011 10:45 am by Toeffelholm



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modelling in 1:22.5 on 32mm and 16.5mm track
Actual project: 7/8" scale on 45 mm track
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 Posted: Fri Jul 22nd, 2011 01:36 pm
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W C Greene
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Juergen-here in the US, the "old way" is 27 MHZ for model cars, 72 and 75 MHZ for aircrat, and who knows what for boats. The US has some "rules" on what can be used on the surace and in the air. Now with 2.4 GHZ, the "rules" are probably gone. That's probably a reason that r/c guys actually have given me their old equipment, nobody wants an old 27 MHZ, AM transmitter...it may fetch 5 bucks on ebay if one is very lucky. However, with the new "rules" enforced by the all seeing eye of the "government", it has become harder to find older sets of transmitter & receiver crystals, there is fear that these could be used by terrorists! Hopefully Li Po batteries will escape the "crackdown", there are fears that they can expolode in the "wrong hands"...and the craziness goes on and on. With these "attitudes", we could see model trains being reduced to being pulled along the floor with a string...oh, but then, someone would get hurt with the string.

As the old rock group the Doors would sing-"People are strange"...

                                           Woodie



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