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Scale sizes
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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 12:36 am
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norgale
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I need some info on the different scales. I just don't have a good pictue in my mind of the difference between ho and oo and on30 and n scales.:slow: maybe somebody can clue me in or post a link to the info. Thanks. pete:old dude:



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 12:57 am
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madmike3434
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HO is 1/8 of an inch equals a foot

OO is very close to HO

S scale is 3/16 of an inch equals a foot

O scale is 1/4 of an inch equals a foot...whether its narrow gauge or standard guage

N scale is 1/16 of an inch equals a foot

G scale is 1/2 inch equals a foot

Take a trip to a hobby shop and look at the locos they have in stock or the rolling stock and you should become a whole lot smarter very quickly.

Then when the model railroad shows are on, drag yourself over to a train show and see hopefully the various scales on display.

 

mike

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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 01:16 am
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norgale
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 What size track does On30 use?

Last edited on Tue Aug 31st, 2010 01:20 am by norgale



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 01:27 am
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dwyaneward
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Model Train Scale Comparison
G Scale: LGB model trains and G scale model trains are the model trains that are the largest popular scale. G scale is often called garden scale because of the large size. They are fairly easy to run, and don't derail easily. G scale does, however, take up a lot of space, and the paraphernalia can be pricey.
  • Scale: 1:22.5
  • Gauge: 1.75"
  • Model Size to Actual Size: 1 inch = 1 foot, 11 inches
O Scale: This is a popular style due to the large size and authenticity of the model. This scale is also easy to run, like the G Scale. But again, it can be expensive to buy the stock for O Scale.
  • Scale: 1:48
  • Gauge: 1.25"
  • Model Size to Actual Size: 1 inch = 4 feet
O27 or O30 Scale: These model trains enable a tighter radius on curves and are very much like O Scale trains. A circular track in O27 scale is 27" across; an O Scale circular track is 31" across. O27 scale is considered a specialized scale, and it's often hard to find the paraphernalia.
  • Scale: 1:48
  • Gauge: 1.25"
  • Model Size to Actual Size: 1 inch = 4 feet
S Scale: This scale is gaining in popularity since it is larger than HO scale but only needs 10 percent more space than HO.
  • Scale: 1:64
  • Gauge: 0.875"
  • Model Size to Actual Size: 1 inch = 5 feet, 4 inches
HO Scale: This is the model train scale that has the highest popularity. HO Scale has the advantages of ease of locating paraphernalia, reasonable pricing, and a size that allows a nice layout on a standard plywood sheet measuring 4' x 8'. If you like a realistic setup, HO accomplishes this very nicely.
  • Scale: 1:87
  • Gauge: 0.650"
  • Model Size to Actual Size: 1 inch = 7 feet, 4 inches
TT Scale: This model train scale is well-liked in Europe, but in the United States its fans are few.
  • Scale: 1:120
  • Gauge: 0.47"
  • Model Size to Actual Size: 1 inch = 10 feet
N Scale: This is a small scale, but permits a large setup even when the available space is small. For those who prioritize the setup and the scenery, N scale works really well. The paraphernalia is small, however, and can be difficult to manipulate. Because its popularity isn't as universal as HO Scale, there are fewer equipment options with N Scale.
  • Scale: 1:16
  • Gauge: 0.353"
  • Model Size to Actual Size: 1 inch = 13 feet, 4 inches
Z Scale: If your space is very limited, Z Scale is a good choice. A large setup is possible in a limited space.
  • Scale: 1:22
  • Gauge: 0.257"
  • Model Size to Actual Size: 1 inch = 18 feet, 4 inches
Scale: Ratio of the actual size to the scale. The very common HO Scale, for example, is 1/87th of actual size, expressed as "1:87."

Gauge:
Railroad track size, meaning the distance between the rails.



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 01:45 am
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norgale
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Ok that's all great info. Thanks to you both for taking the time to post it.  Pete



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 02:10 am
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Dwayne
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My very own scale is 1:17n30... not another soul in the world works in this scale. That's why I designated it as Dn30... the 'D' stands for Dwayne. :P



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 02:14 am
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Bob H.
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Pete, 0n30 uses HO if your in a pinch, But they do sell 0n30 track its the same rail width gauge  as HO except the ties are wider and spaced further apart for 0n30 but costs  more then your run of the mill HO "atlas" track.. Some 0n30 modelers prefer to use HO track and cut out every other tie.  Others like Peco or Micro Engineering 0n30   Or as some of us hand lay our own.  



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 02:29 am
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norgale
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So where does the "N" come in when your running On30?



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 02:33 am
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Dwayne
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The 'n' denotes 'narrow' gauge in all the scales.



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 03:37 am
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norgale
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So narrow gauge means any train size built on a narrower gauge rail than what it would normally use. Am I getting closer? Like an HO gauge train made to run on a N gauge rail? I guess I'm just having a tough time getting my mind around what "narrow gauge" actually means. Narrow gauge engines for instance look like they are built to run on a smaller than normal gauge rail for that particular engine. I also wonder if they are models of a prototype engine as I've never seen any engines that look like a lot of NG engines I see online. In other words where do they come from?  pete



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