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Scale sizes
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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 03:59 am
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Dwayne
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In North America standard gauge is 4'8-1/2". Anything less is narrow gauge. Wider would be broad gauge. Many of the railroads in Colorado for instance were narrow gauge, predominantly 36". Some of those later narrow gauge engines started life as standard gauge and were converted to narrow gauge. They still were fairly large. Earlier engines were smaller but like most things were replaced by bigger and better.

On30 basically runs on HO track. It represents 30" width track. Harold H. here on the forum models in 1:55n3... HO track used as 36" width track.

I use 'G scale' track which is 45mm wide to represent 30" track. Most large scalers these day model in 1:20n3... the same 45mm wide track represents 36" track. A few model in 1:13n2... again 45mm track used to represent 24" track.

:doh:



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 12:55 pm
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Bob H.
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0n30= O scale, N Narrow gauge 30= 30" inches between the rails 0n3= O scale Narrow gauge 36" inches between the rails

HOn30= HO scale Narrow gauge, 30 inches between the rails. HOn3= Ho narrow gauge 36"

So on, so forth through out the scales. O scale (1/4) is a fun scale to scratch build in  craftsman kits are pricey but  more detail can be added for the visual effects. HO (1/8) is  half the price and half the size and easier to find more selection of kits and details but harder on the eyes for us older modelers fine details is harder to achieve. HO is the best selling scale in the world  they say... I model 0n30 and love it. Despite  the kits are expensive.  Therefore I scratch 99% of the time.

Cheers:java:




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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 02:21 pm
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norgale
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You see? All that is rather confusing to anyone other than a student of the gauge. I figure the average Joe like me will go out and buy the stuff he wants to fit the space he has for the money he has to spend. Trying to measure in any scale could be seen as tedious and not worth the time where so much is available already built. My hat's off to you who have the patience and eyesight to manage such a build. For you this is serious buisiness and I don't blame you for defending your chosen gauge of model railroading. However in my case at least, I enjoy the scenicing and building as much if not more than actually running the trains. Same with my boats;I love the building of them more than the running of them but both activities give their own level of satisfaction. Of course the thing with a railroad is that it's never done. There is always one more thing to do no matter how long you've been working on it. A boat will reach a point where you consider it finished and then it's on to another boat. So instead of getting all tied up in a narrow gauge scale I think I will stick to what I know and see what I can do with that. What the hell ,whatever I do now will only be temporary as I hope that I don't have to continue living in this trailer forever. Sooner or later I'll get the house I want with room for the boats the railroad and the cars. I'll want to park the Lincoln in my living room and have the trains right there too along with my boats.  Sure happy to not have a wife to consult on this one.:glad:

Pete

Last edited on Tue Aug 31st, 2010 02:24 pm by norgale



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 02:36 pm
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Dwayne
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I've always maintained that the main obstacle for newbies is the use of letter designations for the various scales. We're the only hobby that does this. Every other hobby that deals with minature uses the actual scale ratio designation. Doll house folks use 1:12 and 1:24, RC guys use 1:8, 1:16, etc.

Try to think in 'scale ratio' instead of arbritrary 'letter' designations. Once you're able to do that then it's a simple matter of deciding whether you'd like to model standard gauge railroads or narrow gauge railroads.



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 02:46 pm
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Bob H.
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:old dude:John Lennon  quote;

"Let it be"



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 03:03 pm
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madmike3434
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john lennon was on drugs when he wrote that

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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 03:37 pm
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norgale
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Hahahaha! You guys are funny. Ok I must admit I have a certain fascination for narrow gauge so why not have two railroads? In real life the narrow gauge railroads tended to feed the bigger gauge railroads at major shipping points for such as passengers and mining products and logging ect. So I could have a mainline of a regular gauge from say New York to San Francisco with stops in Chicago for beef and pork,Kansas City for passengers going West and Denver to pickup loads of silver and gold and then a spur line up to Portland for logs going to lumber mills. All these places could have narrow gauge rails to bring the logs and gold and silver to the mainline for shipmet to San Fran or NY or wherever.

Now were cooking here and the plan gets bigger every minute. But I don't think Florida is a good place for a garden railroad. The high heat will raise hell with the tracks and the rain and general moisture will rot anything including concrete. A 50 year old building is a very rare thing here especially houses. They either get torn down or they fall down after awhile. What the heat and rain doesn't destroy the sun does with ultraviolet rays. Time to go dig out my trains and see what I have to work with.  Pete



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 04:07 pm
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Dwayne
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Outdoor railroads work anywhere... provided one uses rc/battery power. Track power on large scale railroads makes no sense to me but many continue to use it with all the inherent negative issues. Many large scalers are enamored by DCC for some strange reason.

I've got a couple hundred feet worth of code 250 aluminum track in storage to be used once I begin laying track. Track will be handlaid, stub turnouts thrown by hand. KISS is a motto of mine.

Best of luck with whatever scale and gauge you go with.



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 04:21 pm
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Herb Kephart
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Pete-

The reason that models of narrow gauge engines might look strange to you is that now days any "mainline" railroad in the US is standard gauge-4' 8 1/2" (or 56 1/2") There have been in the past, many railroads built to 36" gauge, and even some 24" gauge. The place to see some of these is tourist  railroads in Colorado and Pennsylvania for 36", and Maine for 24"

Industrial lines were a wide assortment of gauge- you can fine a prototype for almost any gauge from 12" on up.

See if you can find "American Narrow Gauge Railroads" by George Hilton.
It explains why some investors and promoters decided to build narrow gauge railroads, their problems, and why they ultimately failed. It also lists, state by state any railroads built to less than standard gauge, with a description of each.

A "must" book for anyone interested in narrow gauge.


Herb:old dude:



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 Posted: Tue Aug 31st, 2010 04:53 pm
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madmike3434
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there ya go , perfect solution, go to library and see what they have for you to read.

Other than that there must be railroady books for sale on ebay that would cover the many questions you have and they supply answers.

Anybody suggest a specific title for him too look for. ????

Before we end answering a million and one questions !

 

mike

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