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Two Sister's Farm
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 Posted: Thu Oct 7th, 2010 09:56 am
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Broadoak
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On another trip to the model shop I came across an Opel Blitz truck but one powered by a gas producer. It looked more old fashioned that the Opel I already had with a 1930’s look about it.

This truck is powered by a Con-Cor chassis from a model I’ve had for years but used very rarely because of its awful over scale handrails. I removed the front drive shaft and flywheel to get it to fit under the body of the truck. A tarpaulin covered box in the back of the truck hides the motor, flywheel and drive shaft. Like the other Opel the body is held in place by self tapping screws pushing against the sides of the can motor.

The truck body was sprayed grey and washed over with watery black Indian ink. The wings (fenders) and radiator cowl were painted black. Splashes of mud and rust are represented by dry brushing rust colour paints on. Ropes and chains and rolled up tarpaulins were added to give the vehicle a bit of extra character.









Originally it was fitted with a KD coupler at the front but because the rail truck is rather longer than the other Opel Blitz it swings out too much and was a menace in the yard. The truck has now been demoted to taking fuel, spares and general running about on the estate.



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Peter M
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 Posted: Fri Oct 8th, 2010 05:12 am
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Broadoak
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Having a few wagons and odd bits of motive power I thought I would do a bit more work on the structures. I decided to paint both the main workshop and the small engine shed a grey asbestos cement colour, as I thought it unlikely that a farm would go to the trouble of painting them. Looking at asbestos buildings locally showed they had a sort of orange coloured lichen growing on some of them, easily replicated with a blob of paint.
The walls were lined with balsa and some shelves put up. An Italeri kit provided a bench and many of the tools in the workshop. There are lubrication charts on the walls, these are reduced copies of the real thing. Both tractors in these pictures are actually diesels on trial and make the date the early 1960’s. The earlier TVO powered tractors I have are rather delicate white metal kits. I usually have an example of both old and new at exhibitions.
The two mechanics are Tamiya military figures that have had hats added to them then painted to look as if they are wearing overalls. Most working men in the 1950’s wore hats.
The black tank next to the workshop is for the storage of TVO as most tractors during the early fifties started on petrol and when the engine was warm changed over to TVO. It is made from odds and ends in the spares box.





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Peter M
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 Posted: Fri Oct 8th, 2010 05:16 am
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Broadoak
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The coal stage in the foreground is a basic box shape made of Tamiya battle damaged walls cut into sections and glued together with MEK. The corrugated iron is actually the inner wrapper of cup holders we use at work. I found this material by accident one morning after an holder had been left out in the rain overnight and had delaminated. It was painted with several coats of grey with a little silver paint added, when dry it was touched up here and there with various rust colours. The corrugated iron sheets are held in place with wooden corner posts and rusty wire. There is some crushed real coal on the loading platform which is made of coffee stirrers. A few tools are found there, shovels, a coal hammer and a pick. The coal is carried on the footplate of the only steam locomotive the farm has in small sacks.

The wood be chopped is for starting the fire in the Porter loco, she helps out at harvest time when things get very busy.



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Peter M
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 Posted: Fri Oct 8th, 2010 10:59 am
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Herb Kephart
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Good lookin rust on the iron!

Herb  :old dude:



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 Posted: Fri Oct 8th, 2010 11:16 am
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Broadoak
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A picture taken in the early days from the operating side of the layout giving a view not normally seen by the public.

The small water tower is made from odds and ends in the scrap box mainly and parts of an Airfix bridge plastic kit. The platform the tank sits on is a few more wooden coffee stirrers from work. The tank itself is from an HO scale re-fuelling facility. The box housing the controls is made of balsa. The other bits are an assortment of wire, chain and masking tape. The tape is used to make the leather bag for filling the loco’s tank. It is also used to simulate the lagging on the rising main which feeds the tank. These are painted in appropriate greyish brown colours.




Before and after photos.

The bridge with the cows being driven over for afternoon milking hides the fiddle yard entrance. The cows are actually Britain’s Jerseys, but a farmer friend told me they look more like Friesians, they are too big and the wrong shape for Jerseys. So I re-painted them by spraying them white then painting on black patches in a random fashion. I finished them off by painting the udders a very pale pink and touching in their eyes, noses and hoofs. The cows are clean at the rear end as it is summer. They only get really mucky in winter when they have to be kept inside.



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Peter M
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 Posted: Fri Oct 8th, 2010 11:32 am
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Broadoak
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The foreman’s hut/office is a scale model of the huts we used to have at work. It is made of strips of balsa wood with a corrugated iron roof, the same material as the coal stage sides. The door is set in the open position to show the interior detail. There is a small stool and a bench with paperwork, a mug, a clipboard hanging up, and some bread and cheese.

The foreman figure is a modified Tamiya German soldier. He has obviously cycled to work on the day the photo was taken.



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Peter M
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 Posted: Sat Oct 9th, 2010 08:29 am
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pilotfriend
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Peter,

Your trucks are absolutely wonderful!

JdF

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 Posted: Sat Oct 9th, 2010 09:20 am
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Herb Kephart
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Great job on the tiny details that hold interest!


Herb  :old dude:



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 Posted: Sat Oct 9th, 2010 09:29 am
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Broadoak
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John,

Praise from a modeller of your calibre is very welcome indeed. Many thanks, you have made my day.

There are still a couple of trucks to describe.



The cold frame itself is a mix of balsa and plasticard with the vegetables being made of Milliput and painted with green acrylics. One of the panes of glass is broken, a bit hackneyed I know, but the children seem to like it.

The Davenport in as new condition is seen passing with a nominal train of sacks of wheat.

The farm grows potatoes, wheat and sugar beet and rotates the crops annually to prevent disease. It also keeps cattle, sheep and pigs their manure being used to improve the soil.





The ON30 scale Davenport when purchased was fitted with the DCC gubbins. This has now been removed and a blanking chip put in and this has transformed its running for the better.

When this photograph was taken only very slight modifications had been done. The cab height had been increased to clear a standing 1/32 scale figure. The control cluster in the cab was raised and a couple of handrails added and the model lightly weathered. Since then a few more changes have been made. An air cleaner and fuel filler have been added to the bonnet top. In the cab a reversing lever and brake wheel have been added, these can’t really be seen but I know they are there! It has also had a bit more weathering added to give a work stained appearance.



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Peter M
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 Posted: Sat Oct 9th, 2010 10:04 am
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Broadoak
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The farm estate that Two Sister’s Farm is very loosely based on had some twenty odd miles of main line and ten miles of sidings all of it two feet gauge. It had a connection with the GER and a facility for loading the crops (mainly potatoes) into lorries as well.
In reality they had an assortment of Simplex locos and ex First World War rolling stock.
I felt the need to build something that could be used to haul these main line trains to the railhead or road interchange. As with the rail trucks I wanted something a little different.
That is how the yellow beast came about. It is totally freelance and is supposed to have a Gardner four cylinder diesel engine which drives a small generator which in turn powers the rear bogie which has two traction motors. The front bogie is un-powered and is purely for load carrying and braking. All this is fiction of course.
The device is seen here with a side tipper used to transport lime out to the fields to
improve the quality of the soil.





The model runs on an Athearn switcher chassis, this time with the rear drive shaft disconnected to give a bit more room in the cab area. The body has bits of its original donor loco, a Baldwin S12 with the cab removed and doors and handles on the bonnet sides added. The cab like the tractors of that time is open to the elements. It has a KD coupler at one end and a link and pin at the other. The driver is a converted army figure with his tin helmet carved and filed to look like his hair.

The beast is seen here with a wooden side tipper on its way to the pig sties to collect the material from mucking out. A single track ran through the centre of the sties to facilitate this.



 



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