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Two Sister's Farm
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 Posted: Sun Oct 10th, 2010 07:03 am
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Broadoak
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A view showing the greenhouse as seen in Summer with the tomato plants being tended by a man with a white apron. They are made of a cocktail stick for the cane supporting the plant. The actual plant being thin wire covered in pva glue then dipped a mix of green flock material. When it had all dried a dab of bright red paint was applied to replicate the tomatoes.

To the left in the foreground is a scratch built short wheelbase bogie wagon with a load bales of straw for bedding in the pig sties. The full length ex-army bogie wagons from WW1 that were really used are just too long on a tiny model like mine.



The guy cleaning windows has obviously wandered off for a cup of tea and a chat with the mechanics in the workshop.
The trailer wheel is in to have a puncture repaired and is a left over part from the Opel Blitz kit.
The jerry cans and large oil drum are from a Tamiya military kit as are the sacks. The sight gauge and valve on the tank are from the spares box. The fine light coloured ground cover is a material we use at work for dealing with oil spills.



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 Posted: Sun Oct 10th, 2010 11:45 am
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Broadoak
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We get a glimpse into the engine shed with its work bench and a tool box plus some parts being worked on. A vice and more tools have been added since this was picture was taken. The floor of the engine house is scribed Milliput painted a dirty black as are the sides of the rails in the shed. A set of fire irons lean against the front of the shed next to an oil drum of rubbish complete with brush and shovel. A group of oil drums containing lubricating oil sit on a balsa wood stand.
Next to the engine house is a low relief barn made of balsa wood painted with watered down Indian ink. It has a rusty corrugated iron roof and a brick base from yet another Tamiya war damaged building!

The Davenport and the Opel truck are seen patiently waiting for their next job.



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 Posted: Sun Oct 10th, 2010 11:52 am
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Broadoak
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The next rail truck I built really is a bit of a critter. It is an ex - American army jeep. It is an Italeri kit and was about six pounds. I didn’t realise until I got it home and looked inside the box that it came complete with a trailer as well. Excellent value I thought. It sits on an ON30 Bachmann Street Car chassis, which is rather high. But the Bachmann chassis was brand new and on offer at only £20 so I am prepared to put up with the extra height. It runs very smoothly and slowly, I must admit I’m a bit of an old woman about slow running.





In the two pictures above the ground cover was still being added a bit at a time at that stage.
The horse drawn device hidden under the tarpaulin is actually part of a German army field kitchen. The tarpaulin which is kitchen towel soaked in pva, then painted with acrylics when dry. This is then washed over in a thin coat of watery dark grey, this runs into the creases and gives it more definition. When this is dry a light flick over with a little cream on
a dry brush. Like this the implement could be anything. Wonderful thing the imagination.




The jeep being rather small really does sit on the chassis and to give it a bit more character I added a load carrying platform behind the four seats. The vehicle is fitted with link and pin couplers so can be used to push or pull small trains when needed. The driver figure is a white metal tractor driver from Scaledown models, he also adds a bit more weight.
It reminded me of a vehicle which worked on the Dennis estates at Nocton Lincs. It was a strange looking car type paraffin-fired steam engine device.
The model is used by the foreman to get urgently needed fuel or spares out into the fields.



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 Posted: Sun Oct 10th, 2010 02:50 pm
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W C Greene
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Peter-that Jeep loco is excellent! While my railroad has an old Ford Model T, I can appreciate "modern" power. I may have to find one of those Bachmann trolleys, I sure like the power truck.



Here is "Little Bill" on the line. The super is out with his pooch "Bunky" on a track inspection run.

                    Woodie



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 Posted: Sun Oct 10th, 2010 04:34 pm
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Broadoak
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I am glad you like the jeep railcar Woodie, I must admit I do like the unusual.

I like your Ford model T rail truck for the same reason, it looks unusual. I like the exposed engine, it sets the model off somehow. Nice little scene as well. How is ” Little Bill powered“?

The contrast between the two layouts is interesting yours looking dry and dusty and mine looking a little more green and lush.

If I remember correctly the Bachmann model was an ON30 scale closed street car.

On mine the jeep body is held on by two screws going through the ends of the chassis which is about 95mm long overall. The wheel centres are 42mm approx. It has a five pole motor so it runs very well.



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 Posted: Sun Oct 10th, 2010 05:03 pm
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Peter-Little Bill was made from a Lindberg 1:32 Model T and has a Falhauber geared motor driving a Grandt Line 2:1 crossbox. There is a 7.4 volt rechargable battery under the tarp and a radio control board under the car. Top speed is est. 7 SMPH. I just love railcars.

               Woodie



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 Posted: Mon Oct 11th, 2010 03:31 am
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Broadoak
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The jeep trailer seen in the very early days, I painted it a dark well rusted colour and it stands leaning on a fence next to the tractor workshop on the right hand side. It is full of rusting junk, farmers seem reluctant to throw things away. More junk, long grass ( old shaving brush bristles ) and foliage were added with a liberal soaking of pva to help secure the tree to the baseboard.

Last edited on Mon Oct 11th, 2010 04:17 am by Broadoak



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 Posted: Mon Oct 11th, 2010 10:04 am
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A Fordson E27N, my favourite tractor, in a lightly weathered state. I remember as a lad sitting on one that my cousin used to drive. The smell of a tractor running on paraffin (kerosene) instantly takes me back to my childhood. Note the workshop starting to fill up with clutter and the lubrication chart on the wall, it’s for the E27N actually.



The loading dock made of balsa and painted with acrylics. The sacks are Tamiya sand bags and the milk churn is a Britain’s item. The bike leaning against the barn is from a Tamiya Military kit.
The long grass is made from tinted shaving brush bristles.



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 Posted: Mon Oct 11th, 2010 10:15 am
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A close up of the Opel Blitz truck showing the KD coupler fitted to the front.
These truck kits after conversion yield a load of useful bits for the scrap box, items like axles wheels and even a complete engine. The latter I’ve used as a load on one of the little Side- line four wheel wagons. It makes a visual change from sacks of potatoes.

All of the high resolution photographs and most of the close ups were taken by my friend and fellow operator at shows, Andy Knott.



The second picture shows the Opel pushing a loaded scratch built freelance bogie wagon. It uses bogies (trucks) from an old HO scale Bachmann boxcar.

I use mostly the smaller 4 wheel wagons at exhibitions as they take up less room. Many of the real farms used the smaller wagons as they were mostly powered by horses.




 



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 Posted: Tue Oct 12th, 2010 04:38 am
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Broadoak
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The Chevrolet truck and its Bachmann Brill chassis performed very well being both smooth and slow running. On my layout pulling power is not an issue but I do like decent slow running. I looked around for another truck that I could motorise using the same chassis. I had long fancied the American Army 6 x 6 GMC truck to convert to a rail truck. I ordered one and the Brill trolley I was going to power it with from my local model shop.






It has a slightly smaller can motor with a gearbox and is quite heavy. The chassis to give an idea of its size is 110mm long but has been modified to suit the model, in this case the GMC truck. Exactly the same chassis was used in the Chevrolet the wheel base of the two bogies is 65mm.



When the two eventually arrived the truck needed much more in the way of alterations to get it to fit the chassis. It was much too long for a start so a length had to be removed from the middle of the load carrying section. This left the bonnet and cab section to build more or less as the plan, apart from removing sections of the cab back, floor and engine bulkhead. The truck chassis itself had to be shortened and a sub chassis made to fit the truck body to the Brill chassis. All a bit fiddly with lots of trial and error fitting of parts. Eventually it all fitted together well and to hide the motor I did my usual trick and made a box to go over the hole in the floor where the motor intruded into the truck load compartment. The box is then covered over with a tarpaulin.

















The truck in the kit should really have a large electric powered winch mounted on the front but I thought the front looked ok without it so I fitted the winch in the back instead. It has link and pin couplers at each end. The guard around the radiator I cut so it just fitted the profile of the bonnet.



I sprayed it a rather bright yellow which I toned down with several thin dark grey washes. The canvas hood over the cab I painted with a matt oil based paint in a fawn colour then gave it a wash of very dilute Indian ink. A spare gerry can of fuel is carried each side of the cab mounted on the running boards. I then added the usual tools, shovels ropes and chains draped over various parts of the vehicle. In the load carrying area is the large tarpaulin covered crate, a forty gallon oil drum, a selection of gerry cans, a spare implement wheel some folded tarpaulins and more rope. At the very back is the electric winch mechanism.

The last photo with a view showing the electric winch fitted to the rear of the GMC rail truck on its way out to the fields. It also shows the link and pin coupling, the link being a piece of paper clip bent into a U shape. Crude I know but it works, either pushing or pulling stock fitted with KD’s
The man working on the Fordson Standard is an modified ex - German tank crew figure the hat he is wearing is made of a circle of ten thou plasticard glued to the top of his head.

Last edited on Tue Oct 12th, 2010 04:51 am by Broadoak



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