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Two Sister's Farm
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 Posted: Tue Oct 12th, 2010 09:47 am
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Herb Kephart
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Great touch, that lube chart on the shed wall-- I can remember seeing that thing a couple times as a kid.

BTW- the front winch on a GMC CCK "duce and a half" is driven by a shaft from the side of the main transmission. We have one, with a second, larger winch mounted on the deck behind the cab driven the same way. Several times I have had three foot of air between the front wheels and the ground, trying to rip out tree roots with the rear winch. Absolutely a terrible vehicle to drive down the road--underpowered, underbraked, and steering that only a gorilla would be happy with. A half hour in it (without even going out on the road) would make anyone wonder how we won WW2.




Herb  :old dude:



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 Posted: Wed Oct 13th, 2010 04:21 am
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Broadoak
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Thanks Herb for the photo of the winch on the front of your truck.






A bit of a break with a selection of photographs taken at exhibitions in the layouts first year being shown in public.



The two were taken at Crewe Heritage Centre at the first exhibition I attended with Two Sister’s Farm. The light in the centre was rather odd and gave the appearance of pictures taken on an evening in Summer.
The first picture shows three tractors being checked over at the end of a hard days work.
The second shows an unusual view looking from the side of the over bridge down the yard.



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 Posted: Wed Oct 13th, 2010 04:32 am
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Broadoak
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These four pictures were taken at a two day show in Corby by a guy who photographed everything on the Saturday then gave all the exhibitors a CD to keep on the Sunday.
Three of the pictures are rather unusual views looking straight down. In one the rather misty cloud I put down to exhaust smoke from the little Barclay shunter, now complete with side skirts to hide the rather toy like motion.
The young lady collecting eggs is a modern Britain’s figure that has been re-painted.










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 Posted: Thu Oct 14th, 2010 03:32 am
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Broadoak
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I thought it about time I increased the size of the conventional locomotive fleet. So I made a sort of Simplex type device that might have been built in the farm’s own workshop on a chassis they had purchased second hand from the government at the end of the First World War.
The model is powered by a Model Power four wheel chassis with a vertical motor at one end and a large metal weight in the middle.



The body is totally freelance and I assumed that the farm workshop wouldn’t have the equipment to bend sheet metal so all panels are flat. The engine cover has doors each side with hinges and handles and hides the central weight. An open sided cab covers the vertically mounted motor. It has a curtain made of folded and painted masking tape to hide the fact there is no driver, there simply isn’t room for one. During the build I added small bits of lead weights wherever I could to improve the model's tracking abilities.
The front footplate has a sideways mounted radiator with a fan and drive belts behind a guard. There are top and bottom radiator hoses and even an overflow pipe. There are two sandboxes and a tool box as well as a handrail. There is another handrail and spare fuel cans mounted on the rear of the cab.
Note the strut supporting the branch this is used to prevent damage in transit, I must admit I didn‘t notice it when I took the photograph.



I sprayed the body in red primer then washed it over with diluted black Indian ink. Then I flicked a dry brush loaded with light grey over it to high light the raised areas. I hung chains and loops of rope from the hand rails to give it a little more character.
Since most of the photographs were taken (apart from the close-up back view) I’ve added a seated figure riding on the engine cover, his job is to open gates when crossing over roads.




 



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 Posted: Fri Oct 15th, 2010 04:47 am
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Broadoak
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The next shunting locomotive is not to be taken seriously. I built it from a selection of unused body parts and a switcher chassis from my spares box. They came about as I have been updating my American switching layout with more modern locos and stock.


It’s a device I really don’t think there is a prototype for! The fiction is that it has a Gardner four cylinder diesel engine at one end (the right side in the photo). This drives a generator at the other end by a long shaft that passes through the middle of the loco behind the driver’s seat. It can be used as a portable generator out in the fields as well as being a conventional diesel electric to power the traction motors in both bogies.


The driver is a Siku tractor driver figure and is made of a hard but bendy plastic that is not easy to modify, so he has just been re-painted.

He is seen here returning home during harvest time late in the evening.





Last edited on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 02:24 pm by Broadoak



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Peter M
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 Posted: Fri Oct 15th, 2010 07:48 am
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Broadoak
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All three of these pictures have been taken on my HO American switching layout. The loco is seen pulling a water tank. The latter is a much shortened Bachmannn flat car with a plastic tank and a balsa tool box added to it. I was going to make it a weed killing wagon but on the estate the weed killer of the day, sodium nitrate, not only killed the weeds it also rotted the track and metal sleepers. Much of their track was second hand from the First World war. The tracks to the fields in any photographs of the estate always look very overgrown.


I have assumed the amount of traffic in the yard keeps this area relatively weed free.



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Peter M
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 Posted: Sat Oct 16th, 2010 04:10 am
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Broadoak
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Late last year in November and again this year in January I exhibited Two Sister’s Farm at two specialist narrow gauge shows organised by two different local groups. Not only were they very enjoyable due to the friendly informal atmosphere but also because of the variety of scales and subjects of the exhibits.


Whilst there my layout was photographed by Mick Thornton and I recently e-mailed Mick to ask permission to use a photograph to illustrate a forthcoming item in the saga. He not only gave permission but sent me a lot more of his excellent photographs as well.


If you like narrow gauge modelling Mick’s site is a must. I am sure you will enjoy the content.

Mick's Roving Reporter Photo Gallery @ fotopic.net






Here are two of Mick’s excellent photos of the layout.


The first shows the work bench in the interior of the engine shed and part of the cab of a Ruston type loco not yet described.


The second picture shows the Fordson “N” standing outside the barn workshop warming up before setting off for the fields.



 



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 Posted: Sun Oct 17th, 2010 09:10 am
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Broadoak
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Due to the small size of the layout four wheel shunters are a bit more flexible so I added another to the growing fleet of locos and rail trucks.



Because the bauxite coloured Simplex type ran rather well using the Model Power Chassis I bought another.



This time I found a drawing of an armoured Simplex and used the basic dimensions to build mine with the exception of the curved sides. Again the Two Sister’s engineers shied away from curving metal and squared up the sides of the second hand ex WD chassis they had acquired. Because it was wider I was able to put more weights into each side of its plasticard footplate. The cab, engine cover, radiator are all plasticard with some Cambrian 16mm scale rivets and nuts strategically placed. Odds and ends from the spares box serve to represent parts of the engine and transmission seen below the bonnet cover. The wire grill is made from the reinforcing from some industrial tape soaked in ACC to make it rigid.



This time I sprayed it with grey primer then painted the body in a light green colour purely to make a change. It is very lightly weathered because I assumed its regular driver looks after it.

Last edited on Sun Oct 17th, 2010 10:31 am by Broadoak



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Peter M
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 Posted: Sun Oct 17th, 2010 10:06 am
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Herb Kephart
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Peter

I think that you are rapidly succumbing to the age old model railroad disease known as - morelocomotivesthancarsium.

Unfortunately there is no known cure, but it rarely becomes fatal. :bg::bg::bg:


Herb  :old dude:



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 Posted: Mon Oct 18th, 2010 02:13 pm
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Broadoak
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I fear you are right Herb. My only excuse as it is such a small model there isn’t much room for rolling stock so I ring the changes with a bigger fleet of locos to keep visitors at exhibitions entertained.


The bad news is I still have a few more to describe.





Last edited on Mon Oct 18th, 2010 02:13 pm by Broadoak



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