Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register

Because of non-railroad abuse of the site, new members MUST use their first names (at least) to join NO EXCEPTIONS!

Two Sister's Farm
 Moderated by: W C Greene Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  ...  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Tue Oct 19th, 2010 02:24 pm
  PMQuoteReply
51st Post
Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 514
Status: 
Offline











The next shunter I made was powered by another Athearn switcher chassis that I had been given.



Again it is a purely freelance design and was built out of plasticard on the base Athearn switcher basic footplate that had had the body removed.



I removed one of the flywheels and a drive shaft to give more room at the back end for the cab and this allowed a seated driver figure to be fitted in.



The body is the usual bodge with a couple of doors to allow access into the engine compartment. The radiator was from an Athearn Hustler body and it is open to allow air in to keep the five pole motor cool. It’s got the usual handrails and bits of rope and chain hanging from them. It has link and pin couplers at both ends.



The body is slightly weighted, the Athearn chassis on its own is quite heavy so it is a nice slow runner.



It is painted in a faded industrial green colour with a little wear and tear weathering.



____________________
Peter M
Back To Top

 Posted: Wed Oct 20th, 2010 06:11 am
  PMQuoteReply
52nd Post
Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 514
Status: 
Offline









The last conventional shunter to emerge from the works is a bit of a Rustonesque affair.


I found a side view drawing in a book called “Diesel Rail Traction” showing a Ruston and Hornsby narrow gauge tractor. It gave a few dimensions and so I was able to roughly scale the drawing up to 1/32 scale. The wheelbase was fixed at the Bachmann 44 ton bogie I was going to use to power it.


The body is my mix of plasticard and wire, working on the principle that if it looks right, it is right. It is well weighted with lead and runs rather well.



To my mind at least I think it captures the look of a little Ruston if not that dimensionally accurate.


When this bogie wears out I shall have to find something to replace it as I’m rather fond of it. A Tenshodo or Black Beetle being favourite I suppose.



____________________
Peter M
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Oct 21st, 2010 04:05 am
  PMQuoteReply
53rd Post
Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 514
Status: 
Offline

You will all be relieved to know that this is the last locomotive I have built.


It is an ex-army Canadian Ford quad gun tractor. It runs on an early Bachmann Brill trolley with a ringfield type motor. I bought the model at a local market for £5 on a stall selling all sorts of toys. The chassis had to be butchered to fit the short wheelbase body by cutting a length out and butt joining it and then adding some more weight in the un powered front truck that also collects current to improve its tracking.
The model is photographed on the joining section of the HO switching layout.

As the model of Two Sister’s is supposed to be summer the canvas cover on the roof is rolled back showing the driver in his shorts. Jerry cans, ropes, lower footboards and a tool box have been added to give the model a little more character.
The rear view shows a steel hawser from an electric winch with a loop for emergency towing emerging from its roller guides. The rope can be used as an alternative. The quad has six seats so is used to take workers out to the fields. A large box inside the back of the vehicle actually covers the power truck but on the model is supposed to cover the electric winch mechanism, an early example of Health and Safety perhaps.
The rolled canvas is made from kitchen towel soaked in pva glue then allowed to dry. It is then painted with acrylics and when that is dry a wash of dark grey put on. When this is dry it is flicked over with a very light grey using a dry brush.














____________________
Peter M
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Oct 21st, 2010 02:25 pm
  PMQuoteReply
54th Post
Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 514
Status: 
Offline


One of the biggest problems I’ve found working in 1/32-1/35 is finding suitable figures. There seem to be two basic sources. The first are 1/32 scale figures intended for the tractor collecting community. There are serious collectors of the more detailed and delicate models, the rest of course are sold as children’s toys. Mostly these depict seated figures with one or two from the Britain’s range being standing figures. They are made of a hard flexible plastic that is not easy to modify. These are all 1/32 scale.



The other source are military figures who in the main are wearing a uniform of some sort. These can be modified with a scalpel and files but it isn’t easy. These are all 1/35 scale.






The photos show a couple of examples of the modified military figures. The first shows a dairy man driving cows over the bridge for afternoon milking. The hat he is wearing is a circle of ten thou plasticard with a hole cut in it to fit over his head and thus form the brim of his hat. I think more people wore hats in the 1950’s, the period of the model than do nowadays. Incidentally the scale cow pats are blobs of solder painted a greenish black.

The mechanic checking the tyre pressures on this Fordson E1A is from a Tamiya tank repair crew and had his hat made in the same way as the man herding the cows. The tractor, an early diesel example is being demonstrated on the farm.



____________________
Peter M
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Oct 21st, 2010 05:13 pm
  PMQuoteReply
55th Post
teetrix
Registered
 

Joined: Sat Nov 29th, 2008
Location: Germany
Posts: 267
Status: 
Offline
Hi Peter,

take a look at Preiser figures for gauge 1, scale 1:32. Can't find a dealer in the UK at the moment, but here is an US one to get the picture:

http://www.eurorailhobbies.com/erh_list.asp?mn=10&sc=1&ca=29

I like your work, especially the diesel shunters :thumb: and the funky look of the layout. But I wonder why the canadian ford still needs camouflage lighting? :bg:

Michael


Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Oct 21st, 2010 05:28 pm
  PMQuoteReply
56th Post
Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 514
Status: 
Offline
Hi Michael,

Thank you for the link for the Preiser people, I believe they are available over here but are very expensive.

With regard to the camouflage light on the Canadian Ford I thought it looked more interesting that’s all. Actually I think he is probably my favourite.



____________________
Peter M
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Oct 22nd, 2010 04:14 am
  PMQuoteReply
57th Post
Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 514
Status: 
Offline




A Massey Ferguson 35 a 3cylinder diesel tractor outside the workshop. Another new tractor on trial on the estate in 1958. It is intended for yard work and light carting, certainly not for cultivating the heavy Lincolnshire clay soil. The model is a Universal Hobbies example and is mainly die cast metal with plastic accessories.

The tractors are not glued in place but are moved around as the fancy takes me. This was bought as the colour is a contrast to the mainly blue painted Fordson fleet.

Two views showing the tractor being checked over by a mechanic wearing brown overalls before starting the day’s work.

The second picture is taken from the fiddle yard looking towards the other end of the layout all of 38.5 inches away.



____________________
Peter M
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Oct 22nd, 2010 04:34 am
  PMQuoteReply
58th Post
Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 514
Status: 
Offline






A general view looking down the yard towards the engine shed and barn. This one is taken looking in the same direction as the previous photograph. Both were taken in the conservatory which explains the rather bright light.

A close up of the engine shed in the early days before the vice on the bench were added. A loaded wagon waiting to be taken to the crew yard with a load of animal feed and bedding.



____________________
Peter M
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Oct 22nd, 2010 04:40 am
  PMQuoteReply
59th Post
Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 514
Status: 
Offline


A view of the yard foreman’s hut and his cold frame he uses to grow vegetables.


All of the photographs up to this point were taken a while ago.


During this Summer while things have been fairly quiet on the exhibition front a few more have been taken.



____________________
Peter M
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Oct 22nd, 2010 05:30 am
  PMQuoteReply
60th Post
Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 514
Status: 
Offline


Things have been quiet on the exhibition front during the summer but with the next show just a month away I thought checking the layout was a good idea.


It is stored in the same spare bedroom as the HO switching layout under a cover made from black plastic. It is odd but despite being completely covered it always manages to get a bit dusty.


I set the layout up and ran the Quad gun tractor for the first time to check clearances before going public with it. It was fine as I thought it would be, although the clearance under the bridge is a little bit tight.











Whilst the layout was set up I took advantage of the situation and took a few photographs as it hasn’t been photographed for some time.



 



____________________
Peter M
Back To Top


 Current time is 08:24 pm
Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  ...  Next Page Last Page  

Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems