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Treatise on overhead construction
 Moderated by: Herb Kephart Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  Next Page Last Page  
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 Posted: Sun Jul 28th, 2013 11:27 pm
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Dave
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Herb, thanks for the information in your post regarding overhead. I've just bought some quarter inch bamboo skewers, which seem to be quite rigid. I hope to get some poles in the ground and some wire in the air over the next week or so, so long as she who must be obeyed doesn't find more little jobs for "idle" hands!
My layout is On30. Since everything is built to less than standard gauge dimensions, should this apply to height of wire as well? I thought about 18 feet sounded OK, but I really have no idea.
I have a heap of very old, but unused Lima flextrack, with steel rail. I can't get it to bend at all without the rail popping out of the spikes. Any suggestions? I remember reading somewhere about using a glass cleaning fluid called Windex for loosening tight spikes on flextrack, but an wary about trying it in case I destroy another length!!
This forum is awesome!
Dave

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 Posted: Mon Jul 29th, 2013 10:55 am
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Herb Kephart
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Dave-

First, let me say that it gives a good feeling, when someone says that I was  of help.

Wire height- If you plan on moving freight cars along your line, I would say that seven foot above the height of a box car roof would be proper--to hopefully keep your brake men from touching the wire with their heads. This may necessitate small "towers" made from strap steel to get the poles on lower equipment to reach the wire and sit at approximately the same angle as regular height cars

Be sure that you hire brakemen that have some common sense. I find that the plastic ones are "smarter" than the metal ones in this regard.

http://www.meetwiki.org/2009/05/electric-train-high-voltage-wire-is.html

Remember to baste yourself first if you try this.

OR--do as I do--I instruct all employees to stay off the car roofs, as my wire is for the most part only 4-5 feet above freight car height. Most comply.

Herb



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 Posted: Mon Jul 29th, 2013 11:08 am
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W C Greene
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As for that pesky old track which comes undone...just strip that fine steel rail off the nasty plastic ties and handlay some nice track. You will feel much better.

Woodie



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 Posted: Mon Jul 29th, 2013 07:02 pm
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Dave
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Thanks again, Herb. I never thought about the brakemen - we never had those hardy gents here, as far as I can tell. All our early brake manipulating gear was at a height reachable from the ground - none of this walking along the roofs of moving cars stuff. I don't think so, anyway.
Maybe on timber tramways, perhaps.
Anyway, thanks again for your advice.
Dave

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 Posted: Mon Jul 29th, 2013 08:19 pm
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Dave
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Gee, thanks, Woody. I guess that is one way to fix the problem of inflexible flextrack. Haven't hand laid track this small before, code 250 brass rail is so easy to lay, but I'm not sure about this fiddly code 100 stuff. Guess I can give it a go.
I'm fast running out of excuses, aren't I?
Take care
Dave

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 Posted: Fri Aug 9th, 2013 01:24 pm
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ebtnut
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OK, at Herb's request I'm going to try posting some pics.  This is at the McKeesport (PA) Model RR club.  The club is totally rebuilding the layout for better operational possibilities.  I volunteered to try and install a working trolley line.  The pics show the reverse loop at the end of the line, the small town there, and a stretch of what will be PROW.  The city area needs to have the girder rail put in to complete the loop on the other end.  The track is code 70 flex and I bench-built the loop turnout with the 8" radius curve.  The club has its own building and is open on Friday evenings on Walnut Street in McKeesport.






Note that the final location of the structures haven't been set yet.  In the town, the track will be ballasted, with driving lanes for the street on both sides.  I hope to start stringing some overhead when I get up there next time (I live 200 miles away but we have a second home about 6 blocks from the club so we vist regularly). 

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 Posted: Thu Oct 17th, 2013 03:09 pm
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ebtnut
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OK, question on DCC. I've been having a conversation over on the Bachmann site, and a couple of folks have raised the issue that using the overhead with DCC might not be a good idea because the "intermittent" contact of the wheel/slider on the wire can interrupt the circuit, stopping the car until the DCC resets. Anyone using DCC with overhead had any experience with this? Any solutions?

BTW, I hope to get back up to the club next weekend and finish stringing the wire over that reverse loop seen the pics above. Then construction will have to end becuase the club needs to get set up for the holiday open houses. We'll use the DC with the Circuitron auto reverse circuit again this year to run the trolley.

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 Posted: Mon Oct 21st, 2013 11:34 pm
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Across the Bridge
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SCTC has a lot of experience with DCC trolley operation, and much of it has been written-up in the monthly Trolleyville Times, which can be found on the SCTC web site.

Also, there are now DCC decoders with super-caps that will keep a car/loco running for several seconds during any loss of electrical contact with its normal power source.

Will 

 

 

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 Posted: Mon Oct 21st, 2013 11:38 pm
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Across the Bridge
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ebtnut wrote:


I hope to start stringing some overhead......


Those line poles look a bit far apart.

 

Will

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 Posted: Tue Oct 22nd, 2013 09:59 am
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ebtnut
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Yeah, I've had to add a few more poles as I got seriously into hanging the wire. I'll post a couple more pics once I get the wire over the loop.

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