Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Traction & Electrified Railroads > Treatise on overhead construction

Because of non-railroad abuse of the site, new members MUST use their first names (at least) to join NO EXCEPTIONS!

Treatise on overhead construction
 Moderated by: Herb Kephart Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  ...  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Thu Jan 26th, 2012 10:17 am
  PMQuoteReply
41st Post
Herb Kephart
Super Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 6096
Status: 
Offline
Mr Nut

If you are looking for a how-to- do on the poles on the car roof--as opposed to the ones alongside the track--ain't gonna happen.

Years ago, when the supplier of 95% of the car pole O scale market--Rich Wagner (RIP)- had a heart attack, the supply dried up. I set about making a run of 100 to satisfy the local market. Bought springs- had to have them wound special, as there was nothing commercially available, machined the base pieces, and about that time figured that Rich was working for less than $1 an hour. I believe that he was selling poles for $2.75 a pair at the time. Never finished the project.

I make my own pantographs, but that is because I don't like the heavy, mainline electric (GG1 et al) pattern. Again, there is no way that I would make them for sale.

When I was making a series of O scale car kits--sold under the Copetown Car Works name, I spent much more time on the brass master patterns, than what the final selling price warranted. Sold the patterns and Ashland car works ran another run of some of the cars, although they had problems casting some of the parts. Still have a bunch of castings, found that remelted, they make excellent bullets.



Herb 



____________________
Fix it again, Mr Gates--it still works!"
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Jan 26th, 2012 10:24 am
  PMQuoteReply
42nd Post
W C Greene
Super Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 7402
Status: 
Offline
Herb-a little off topic here...as for a fellow manufacturing model rr stuff, witness the HOn30 guys who want someone to make them a "great running, prototypical" HOn30 steam loco chassis...for around 50 bucks! Yep, they don't have the b@(($ to do it so they want someone else to get paid 50 pesos an hour for their time.

I understand why stuff don't get made any more.

Woodrow



____________________
Go ahead, make my day!
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Jan 27th, 2012 09:02 pm
  PMQuoteReply
43rd Post
chasv
Registered


Joined: Mon Oct 24th, 2011
Location: Riverside, California USA
Posts: 861
Status: 
Offline
fascinating thread on the down guy you can use a queen post like they do on telephone poles and sometimes power poles the ankers are 6' deep i have dug a couple of them also helped set a couple of poles in back yards fun!!!



____________________

Charles
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Jan 27th, 2012 10:41 pm
  PMQuoteReply
44th Post
Herb Kephart
Super Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 6096
Status: 
Offline
Good idea, but digging any kind of hole isn't my kind of fun!!!


Herb 



____________________
Fix it again, Mr Gates--it still works!"
Back To Top

 Posted: Sat Jan 28th, 2012 10:47 am
  PMQuoteReply
45th Post
W C Greene
Super Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 7402
Status: 
Offline
Now, I'm not an overhead modeler...but I have in my custody a couple of PSC O scale trolley poles, one with a shoe and the other with a neat little spoked wheel. No, I ain't offering them for sale, I might, MIGHT, use them in the future. I just wanted to let ya'll know that PSC has such things for HO and O and they also show several neat items in their catalogs like truck sideframes, details for trolleys, wire stringing hardware, and other details that I don't know what they are about. Interested parties might check out Precision Scale for what's available. OK, is that back "on topic"?
Woodie



____________________
Go ahead, make my day!
Back To Top

 Posted: Sat Feb 4th, 2012 08:38 pm
  PMQuoteReply
46th Post
pipopak
Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 13th, 2011
Location: Florida USA
Posts: 1696
Status: 
Offline
I posted this at another site today, has some "pearls of wisdom":
David L. Pippen
dpippen@nmsu.edu
Assistant College Professor
New Mexico State University

http://et.nmsu.edu/~etti/fall97/electronics/solder.html

I'd say that is the most complete I saw.

Use a flux labeled "non-acid" or "for electronics".

Also, when using pantographs instead of trolleys, the wire is installed so it wanders a little bit each side from post to post to minimize pantograph wear. FWIW.
Jose.



____________________
Junk is something you throw away three weeks before you need it.
Back To Top

 Posted: Wed May 9th, 2012 06:09 pm
  PMQuoteReply
47th Post
Herb Kephart
Super Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 6096
Status: 
Offline
Questions have arisen as to what a wire frog looks like.

As I mentioned earlier in this series, they can be as simple as a triangular piece of shim brass, with the two long edges turned down 90º, or can be lost wax castings. The castings were always expensive, so most times I made my own from brass shim stock



The grid that they are sitting on is 1/4" squares



It is important that the distance from the wire hole to the vertical edges is as close to one half the width of the shoe, or wheel, on the end of the pole as possible.

Some modelers in O scale have used rotating trolley wheels with some success. 
I tried them, and found that they were much more "picky" about wire alignment, and electrical pickup VS a sliding wheel or shoe (which will scrape dust off the wire, rather than just rolling over it). One of the supposed advantages to a rotating wheel is that it will back up without dewireing-- but if wire has some degree of tension, and is hung low enough that the car pole angle is within 10-15º of horizontal, I never had a problem. You can back through a wire frog from the diverging wire end with success, and even from the other end ---if the pole should always follow the same route, IF the frog is tipped slightly to favor the desired route. Too much tip will cause poles approaching on a car running forwards to always follow that route also, however.


Herb 



____________________
Fix it again, Mr Gates--it still works!"
Back To Top

 Posted: Wed May 9th, 2012 08:01 pm
  PMQuoteReply
48th Post
W C Greene
Super Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 7402
Status: 
Offline
OK, I can see where a shoe would be less pickey but I just LOVE them tiny spoked wheels! Would the wheel operate better if it didn't actually rotate? Vexing questions, I am sure.

Woodie



____________________
Go ahead, make my day!
Back To Top

 Posted: Wed May 9th, 2012 08:56 pm
  PMQuoteReply
49th Post
Herb Kephart
Super Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 6096
Status: 
Offline
Woodie

Yes definitely a non rotating wheel works just fine--in fact most of my cars that have poles use them, because the shape of a shoe causes it to snag on cross spans when there is a dewirement, whereas the wheel even though not rotating, will just bounce off.

If you do try rotating wheels, don't try to use a small axle. Wears out far too quick. Drill a hole through both sides of the harp (forked thingus on upper end of pole) at axle position. Then make a bushing with a wire sized hole in the center, and the OD as large as possible, considering the hub in the wheel center. Length of bushing is distance between legs of the harp, which, in turn, is just slightly more than the width of the wheel to stabilize the wheel, without impeding rotation. Small piece of wire through harp and bushing, bent over on ends. Bushing should not rotate. Still wears out, just not as quick.

Herbal  



____________________
Fix it again, Mr Gates--it still works!"
Back To Top

 Posted: Sat Jun 16th, 2012 09:57 pm
  PMQuoteReply
50th Post
smokebox
Guest
 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline
HIYA,

I was wondering, and yes I know this will be a good bit down the road before the Cats are built but...
I would like to have a city on each on each end of my line and heavy loco's like GG1's Little Joes and maybe some rectifers, so I would like high voltage cats for the mainlines.
In the city's I would like trolley lines and I would like steeple cabs and critters working the freight yards.
Would I need to make single wire for the yards or would cats be used in yards also?
I would like to use pantographs on the steeplecabs with a pole for looks like the Sacramento Northern but these are small steeplecabs ( from canonball ) and it will be quite a job making a base for the pantographs and still have enough room for the pole.
Or due to the very small roof on them should I just go with a pole, and if the pole and panto wires would not work just keep them seperate to simplify things?

Rob Wright
smokebox

HAPPY FATHERS DAY Everyone!!

Back To Top


 Current time is 01:03 pm
Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  ...  Next Page Last Page  

Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Traction & Electrified Railroads > Treatise on overhead construction
Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems