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A lightweight rail pick-up critter
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 Posted: Thu Feb 3rd, 2011 07:33 pm
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Huw Griffiths
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Peter,

I'm in the process of going through some of the bookmarks on my computer - and dug these ones out - I don't know how relevant they are.


Although these ones are more about models than real trucks, they clearly show that some 2 axle Ford AAs (and GAZ derivatives) were converted into tankers:

http://henk.fox3000.com/Rtrucks.htm

http://smokybottom.com/product_info.php?products_id=46&osCsid=d6952c852109c5dde7f04e6006dee00f

 
I also came across a site with loads of drawings and photos of the Russian trucks (there are separate pages for each variant - eg for the GAZ AAA, replace the "GAZ_AA" at the end of the address with "GAZ_AAA" and so on):

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/rkkaww2/galleries/trucks/GAZ_AA.htm

There was also this one - loads of detailed (unfortunately unscaled) drawings of Russian and German trucks, tanks etc from WW2. There's a menu on the left, with a number of links - following the "Russian Trucks" link leads you to a number of thumbails, each of which leads to drawings of the specific types. A flag at the top right of the initial page leads to a related site, doing the same for vehicles used by Germany during WW2. Both sites also include loads of vehicles imported from other countries, or used after they'd been abandoned by retreating armies (like a number of Chevrolets). I spent a bit of time here:

http://www.o5m6.de/index.html

Finally, a page from a workshop forum site - if you scroll down, you'll find some drawings for the (apparently similar) Ford B:

http://www.simmerspaintshop.com/forums/f46-vehicle-profile-painting/1929-ford-model-drawings-2786/

 
I hope some of these are of some use (or at least as much interest as they are to me).

 
All the best,

Huw.

Last edited on Thu Feb 3rd, 2011 07:34 pm by Huw Griffiths

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 Posted: Thu Feb 3rd, 2011 11:15 pm
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wclm
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Peter

 I just completed one of these trucks. Yours is really nice. It has a great look to it. I thought it was a good kit. It is on a flat car with the Tamiya "Komatsu" dozer. It is part of my work train. I want t build another of each when the shop gets some more in. I think that all of Tamiya's 1/48 kits are done quite well.

                                                                              Clif K.



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 Posted: Fri Feb 4th, 2011 08:53 am
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Broadoak
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Huw, some more excellent links to ponder, especially Smokey Bottom. The drawings are very interesting in The armchair general, I was a Technical Artist many years ago.




I think I fancy something a bit more home built, as if it had been made in the farm workshops with limited funds and resources. I have not decided finally yet, I like to get the feel of the kit first. I will however think of it as the Ford version that the farm picked up second hand after the war.




The first picture shows a Bedford truck working in New Zealand, this photo fired my imagination and was the catalyst for starting Two sister’s Farm originally. I rather liked the idea of different vehicles along with more conventional forms of motive power.



I still don’t have an example of another favourite of mine the Bedford QL there is a 1/35 scale kit of it with a gun mounted in the back. With such a small layout all you can do really is add more forms of motive power to keep your interest going. I have always had an interest in soft skinned military vehicles more than the armoured ones. The model keeps my interest alive by making them into rail trucks. I also know that at an exhibition no one else will have the same forms of motive power that I have, wonderful thing the imagination.
















The other two pictures illustrate some of the other oddities that have been built. I think however bizarre your imagination is it has probably already been done. The prototype for everything syndrome I suppose.



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 Posted: Fri Feb 4th, 2011 11:51 am
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mosslake1
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Thanks for the great links Huw. The Ford railbus is interesting, something different from the other kits. That diecast truck reminded me that I have an old Matchbox Yesteryear Crossley truck at home that might be useful  (also a Rolls Royce armoured car, wonder how that'll look on railsL:).

 Those Bedford photos brought back a lot of memories....thanks mate:thumb:



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 Posted: Fri Feb 4th, 2011 01:00 pm
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Huw Griffiths
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Broadoak wrote: ... I was a Technical Artist many years ago.


I think I fancy something a bit more home built, as if it had been made in the farm workshops with limited funds and resources. I have not decided finally yet, I like to get the feel of the kit first. I will however think of it as the Ford version that the farm picked up second hand after the war.


... I think however bizarre your imagination is it has probably already been done. The prototype for everything syndrome I suppose.

I'm not surprised about you having been a technical artist - capturing scenes (and details) as well as you've done takes a certain eye, which many people don't have. This is one reason why, when you build your new railtruck, I'm sure the finished product will be worth waiting for.

 
I don't want to sidetrack you, but I'm sure you sometimes get some "you'd never see that" comments at exhibitions about some of your motive power. Like you, I reckon you would see it all - and more. The issue is whether some people actually see (or believe) some of the more unusual stuff that runs on rails.

One thread on the SE Lounge forum recently caught my eye. Someone posted pictures of bulldozers converted to run on rails at a salt plant - these pictures were followed by a build of a detailed large scale model version (actually a couple of them):

http://www.7-8ths.info/index.php/topic,16682046.0.html

Some of the pictures in the o5m6.de site also looked pretty extreme - like tractors fitted with cabs from scrapped trucks.

I'm sure someone, somewhere, will have tried combining these ideas - with a "railed" tractor or bulldozer, fitted with a cab - but whether anyone would ever want to model it...

 
I've also seen a book about the Tatra T3 trams, which included a number of photos showing part-built tramcars being towed around the (now demolished) Prague tram factory on rails and accommodation bogies, behind some rather rough looking tractors. Later pictures showed similar scenes - but with the tractors replaced by conventional road trucks.


As for the "you'd never see that" brigade at shows, I'd love to know what they'd make of this picture - showing a lorry, fitted with rail wheels and towing passenger cars in service. If this isn't a case of "prototype for everything", I don't know what is:

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/201/503487640_d289a40e99_z.jpg?zz=1 


Changing the subject, I can see why that Bedford photo would have motivated you to start building critters (followed by a layout to run them on). OK, I might personally prefer vehicles to look a bit more pristine - but pictures like that do have a certain old world charm (emphasis on old).


Anyway, I think I've already taken more than enough of your time - so I'll let you get on with what you're doing.

All the best,

Huw.



EDIT:  Here's another example of "prototype for everything" - part way down the page on this link, there's a photo clearly showing a Simplex "tin turtle" working a train of passenger stock:

http://www.hfstephens-museum.org.uk/locomotives/traction-on-the-festiniog-and-whr.html

Last edited on Sat Feb 5th, 2011 06:53 pm by Huw Griffiths

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 Posted: Fri Feb 4th, 2011 01:28 pm
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Huw Griffiths
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mosslake1 wrote: The Ford railbus is interesting, something different from the other kits. That diecast truck reminded me that I have an old Matchbox Yesteryear Crossley truck at home that might be useful  (also a Rolls Royce armoured car, wonder how that'll look on railsL:).

 Those Bedford photos brought back a lot of memories....thanks mate:thumb:

I'm not sure what scale those Matchbox models are - are they about O scale - are they a lot smaller - or are they a mix?

I don't know. I also don't know if it really matters - ultimately, there's only one person they've got to look right to (and it's not me) ...


To be honest, I've had my eye on another diecast from the same series as the one I linked to:

http://www.anticsonline.co.uk/2198_1_105746500.html

It would probably be too small to do an Isle of Sylt style conversion, like in the link in my last post - but I'm sure I could come up with something just as creative. The question is whether I decide to. A lot of model makers suffer from this "more ideas than time" ailment - why should I be any different?


I'm sure I'll come up with something sometime - who knows, it might even get built.

Anyway, all the best with your project - whatever it is. I'm sure it'll turn out fine.

Regards,

Huw.

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 Posted: Fri Feb 4th, 2011 05:22 pm
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mosslake1
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Huw Griffiths wrote: One thread on the SE Lounge forum recently caught my eye. Someone posted pictures of bulldozers converted to run on rails at a salt plant - these pictures were followed by a build of a detailed large scale model version (actually a couple of them):

http://www.7-8ths.info/index.php/topic,16682046.0.html

,

Huw.


They look familiar, possibly from an article in the Narrow Gauge & Short Line Gazette in recent years. Interesting though...



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 Posted: Sat Feb 5th, 2011 12:25 am
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Herb Kephart
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Hey Don

That link weighs more than the "thing" in the picture!!


Herbie  :old dude:



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 Posted: Sat Feb 5th, 2011 10:14 am
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Broadoak
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Huw,


It is surprising but very few people say you wouldn’t see that when one of our rail trucks appear. I have a few photos to show those with doubts, but there seem very few.


In fact the only rivet counter we have come across in thirty shows was concerned that the tractor lubrication chart on the wall showed the wrong type of mudguards (fenders). I copied the chart from a Fordson handbook so it is correct. Although to be fair to the guy Fordson did change the mudguards when the tractor went into production.



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 Posted: Sat Feb 5th, 2011 10:15 am
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Broadoak
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Huw,





It is surprising but very few people say you wouldn’t see that when one of our rail trucks appear. I have a few photos to show those with doubts, but there seem very few.



In fact the only rivet counter we have come across in thirty shows was concerned that the tractor lubrication chart on the wall showed the wrong type of mudguards (fenders). I copied the chart from a Fordson handbook so it is correct. Although to be fair to the guy Fordson did change the mudguards when the tractor went into production.



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