Freerails Home 
Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Railcars Railtrucks & Critters > A lightweight rail pick-up critter

Freerails IS ACCEPTING new Members ... To join Freerails ... See how to Register as a Member in the 'Joining Freerails' Forum

 Moderated by: .  
AuthorPost
Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline

This is Tilly, the latest addition to Two Sister’s farm’s growing fleet of unusual vehicles. It is an ex Second World War 10 HP light utility car with a pick up body. She is used only for track maintenance purposes and not general haulage.


The kit is made by Tamiya and is rather delicate with the clear plastic parts being a rather poor fit. I have left the bonnet off to show the details in the engine bay, as it seemed a pity to hide them.


I made a false chassis to attach and locate the body to the power unit which is from an HO Bachmann HI-rail track maintenance van. The body has a solid block of plasticard at the back of the false chassis which was drilled and tapped. One long screw then holds the two together. It has little out rider wheels which also pick up current. I added extra weight in any place I could inside the plastic body to help it track better.


If you have found this little pick up truck to your liking then have a look at Two Sister’s Farm in the narrow gauge section of the forum. There are lots more examples of this sort of thing.







W C Greene
Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Royse City, Texas USA
Posts: 8253
Status: 
Offline
Peter-that is cool as you know what! A wonderful model. I love it. What else can I say? I have been looking for ideas on another rail truck and you have inspired me to find something a bit more "modern" than the Model T I have...those "bug eye" headlights and neat grill do nthe trick. Which Tamiya kit did you use? Thank you.

                           Woodie

Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline

Hi Woodie,




I’m glad you like Tilly she is rather cute isn‘t she.


The Kit is 1/35 Tamiya No 308 British Light Utility car 10 HP. It comes complete with a seated driver figure as well. She should really have two headlights but I broke one in the rush to get the model finished for an exhibition I did the other week. With hindsight I would fix the headlights using a thin brass rod instead of the plastic one supplied in the kit.


Hope this helps.

Huw Griffiths
Registered


Joined: Wed Oct 21st, 2009
Location: Cwmbran, Wales, United Kingdom
Posts: 260
Status: 
Offline
The false chassis looks like a neat idea.

From what I can work out, there were a number of British road vehicles being built at the time with similar bonnet and radiator styling.

Apart from the Austin Ten utility van ("utility" presumably getting corrupted into "tilly"), there were also a number of Bedfords (think Chevrolet...) with very similar styling. The Bedfords ranged in size from K types (similar in size to the Austin Ten), right up to O types (full sized commercials - variants included trucks and the iconic OB buses).


Meanwhile, in the Soviet Union, they were building some military trucks which might have looked rather familiar to some people:

http://www.cybermodeler.com/hobby/kits/zve/kit_zve_3602.shtml

From what I can work out, these trucks appeared in a number of variants - one of the more numerous variants being the GAZ AAA, with 3 axles. Zvezda do a kit of this one - which would interest me, if it were in a different scale:

http://www.modelhobbies.co.uk/shop/zvezda-gazaaa-wwii-soviet-truck-3547-p-5790.html

 
(OK, I know there's a Unimodels kit of the GAZ AAA, in 1:48 - but I've never actually seen it. The Tamiya Austin Ten is also offered in 1:48 - as are a number of their other military vehicle kits including, of all things, a Komatsu bulldozer - but I'm not sure I'll be building rail based versions of any of them in the near future.)


Anyway, I think I'd better stop hijacking the thread ... .


Regards,

Huw.

Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline

Woodie,




A couple of pictures showing a bit more detail of Tilly.



These were taken at a show a couple of weeks ago.









Also thanks Huw, your links are always interesting.





 

Last edited on Wed Feb 2nd, 2011 09:57 pm by Broadoak

W C Greene
Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Royse City, Texas USA
Posts: 8253
Status: 
Offline
The GAZ AA & AAA trucks were made from US (GMC/Chevy) designs by the Russians. Matter of fact, the US gave them some 1930's model trucks as "lend lease" and there are models of these also. ZVEZDA makes these models in 1:35 scale along with the KATYUSA rocket launcher truck which is a desd ringer for a GMC model. These trucks are not as "modern" looking as the British car shown, and I will look for something that would be available in the US, I doubt that such a car would be found in the wilds of New Mexico. The car kind of reminds me of an early 1940's Chevy...maybe that's what I want. Again, thanks for the inspiration.

BTW-anyone wanting the ZVEZDA kits can find them and more at SQUADRON on line.

                               Woodie

***The AA & AAA trucks were FORD designs...that's what I get for reading a kit's instructions. I promise to never do that again! Thanks to Herb "Mr Ford" Kephart for showing me the error of my ways. From now on, instruction sheets will be burned upon opening a new kit!*************

Last edited on Thu Feb 3rd, 2011 02:11 pm by W C Greene

mosslake1
Registered
 

Joined: Sun Jan 16th, 2011
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 70
Status: 
Offline
I think the Roco Minitanks line have a somilar Russian truck available.

My On30 logging line is still in the early stages but I've been thinking of a model 'T' railcar along similar lines. The reason for wanting one on my otherwise 1900s logger is that McKenzie Iron & Steel make an O scale figure set of Laurel & Hardy to fit in an open tourer car. I think it'd be kool having them as the 'company brass':2t:

Huw Griffiths
Registered


Joined: Wed Oct 21st, 2009
Location: Cwmbran, Wales, United Kingdom
Posts: 260
Status: 
Offline
mosslake1 wrote: My On30 logging line is still in the early stages but I've been thinking of a model 'T' railcar along similar lines.
I don't know whether they're available in Australia, but some UK model shops have recently been selling these - I wonder if they might be usable as donor models:

http://www.anticsonline.co.uk/2198_1_105746561.html

A number of 1:43 etched brass kits have also appeared of Model T based railmotors - like this Branchlines kit, which was built by a member of the British forum site RMweb:

http://mozzer-models-.fotopic.net/p60555433.html

 
While on the subject of models of old vehicles, some people might be wondering why I mentioned the Zvezda kits of GAZ AAs and AAAs (especially as I don't even model in 1:35). I've liked Wismar railbuses for some time. As I can't get O scale kits of these locally (or anywhere, at a price I can afford), I've been looking out for suitably sized (and priced) kits of the Ford AAs that I believe they were based on.

A few months back, I noticed one of the GAZ AAA kits in a model shop - and thought it looked familiar. This led to me doing some research on the web. (It also got me thinking about why some sites are known as search engines, as opposed to find engines - probably best if I don't go any further on this issue ... !)

A number of sources were suggesting that the GAZ AAs and AAAs were effectively Ford AAs, built under licence - I don't know the truth of this, as I've never seen one of the things for real. Even if I did know, I wouldn't get too worried about it.

OK, so I'd identified a kit with the hood styling I was looking for - unfortunately not in a scale I can use, so the idea goes on the back burner. If I come across one locally in a different scale, I might go for it (on the other hand, I might not - depends on the cost and whether I'm still interested) - time will tell.

My reason for mentioning the kits was really to show how a number of much older designs were still being made in some places, years after the original manufacturer had washed their hands of them - that was really about it.

 
Moving on, it isn't hard to see why the "Tilly" kit looked similar to a number of Chevrolets and Bedfords of the era (and some years later). In case they're of interest to anyone, here are some links to some Bedfords, seen at rallies. First, here's a Bedford K:

http://www.ianhardy.net/gallery/main.php/d/15158-2/CRW_3594.jpg

Now a Bedford O truck, followed by a Bedford OB bus:

http://slatford.co.uk/Kensworth%20Pics/Bedford%20OB.JPG

http://bus-and-coach-photos.com.s3.amazonaws.com/2700.jpg


It might be interesting to compare these to some WW2 LRDG Chevrolet trucks. Apart from the wheelarches and front grille and fender being built up a bit - and variations in wheelbase - the vehicles look very similar:

http://www.lrdg.org/LRDG-Photo-gallery(early).htm


This would probably make the Tamiya / Revell / Italeri kits very plausible as base models. Whether anyone chooses to use them is another matter...

Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline

Thank you for the link Huw, this morning saw me in my local model shop ordering the four wheel Russian truck. I think it will make an excellent rail truck for the farm. I fancy a fuel tanker this time with tank mounted in the drop side body. This would be used to re-fuel the tractors working out in the fields.


I have a choice of chassis, an Athearn SW7 switcher or a Con-Cor SW1500, both run extremely well. Alternatively I could use Tenshodo for power and an un-powered truck for extra current collection. I will make a decision later when I see how much room I have.


When I was a lad in the early 1950’s I lived in a small village in Hertfordshire. Opposite was a small transport business who used horses as well as a couple of trucks, or lorries as we called them then. They were Fords and looked exactly like the kit I’ve ordered. That is the main reason I found the kit so attractive.


Once again Huw many thanks I would not have found this without your links.

Huw Griffiths
Registered


Joined: Wed Oct 21st, 2009
Location: Cwmbran, Wales, United Kingdom
Posts: 260
Status: 
Offline
Peter,

Many thanks for your kind comments.

The tanker conversion sounds very workable - and I'm sure you could find a number of similar projects documented on the web. For example, I came across this one, based on the 3 axle variant (although I'm sure there would have been some based on the original 2 axle chassis - I believe the 3 axle version was developed because of local conditions):

http://www.hyperscale.com/features/2001/gazaais_2.htm

I don't know if it might also be worth checking through back issues of Truck Model World.


All the best with your project,

Huw.

Huw Griffiths
Registered


Joined: Wed Oct 21st, 2009
Location: Cwmbran, Wales, United Kingdom
Posts: 260
Status: 
Offline
Peter,

I'm in the process of going through some of the bookmarks on my computer - and dug these ones out - I don't know how relevant they are.


Although these ones are more about models than real trucks, they clearly show that some 2 axle Ford AAs (and GAZ derivatives) were converted into tankers:

http://henk.fox3000.com/Rtrucks.htm

http://smokybottom.com/product_info.php?products_id=46&osCsid=d6952c852109c5dde7f04e6006dee00f

 
I also came across a site with loads of drawings and photos of the Russian trucks (there are separate pages for each variant - eg for the GAZ AAA, replace the "GAZ_AA" at the end of the address with "GAZ_AAA" and so on):

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/rkkaww2/galleries/trucks/GAZ_AA.htm

There was also this one - loads of detailed (unfortunately unscaled) drawings of Russian and German trucks, tanks etc from WW2. There's a menu on the left, with a number of links - following the "Russian Trucks" link leads you to a number of thumbails, each of which leads to drawings of the specific types. A flag at the top right of the initial page leads to a related site, doing the same for vehicles used by Germany during WW2. Both sites also include loads of vehicles imported from other countries, or used after they'd been abandoned by retreating armies (like a number of Chevrolets). I spent a bit of time here:

http://www.o5m6.de/index.html

Finally, a page from a workshop forum site - if you scroll down, you'll find some drawings for the (apparently similar) Ford B:

http://www.simmerspaintshop.com/forums/f46-vehicle-profile-painting/1929-ford-model-drawings-2786/

 
I hope some of these are of some use (or at least as much interest as they are to me).

 
All the best,

Huw.

Last edited on Thu Feb 3rd, 2011 07:34 pm by Huw Griffiths

wclm
Registered


Joined: Thu Dec 25th, 2008
Location: Dacono, Colorado USA
Posts: 556
Status: 
Offline
Peter

 I just completed one of these trucks. Yours is really nice. It has a great look to it. I thought it was a good kit. It is on a flat car with the Tamiya "Komatsu" dozer. It is part of my work train. I want t build another of each when the shop gets some more in. I think that all of Tamiya's 1/48 kits are done quite well.

                                                                              Clif K.

Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline

Huw, some more excellent links to ponder, especially Smokey Bottom. The drawings are very interesting in The armchair general, I was a Technical Artist many years ago.




I think I fancy something a bit more home built, as if it had been made in the farm workshops with limited funds and resources. I have not decided finally yet, I like to get the feel of the kit first. I will however think of it as the Ford version that the farm picked up second hand after the war.




The first picture shows a Bedford truck working in New Zealand, this photo fired my imagination and was the catalyst for starting Two sister’s Farm originally. I rather liked the idea of different vehicles along with more conventional forms of motive power.



I still don’t have an example of another favourite of mine the Bedford QL there is a 1/35 scale kit of it with a gun mounted in the back. With such a small layout all you can do really is add more forms of motive power to keep your interest going. I have always had an interest in soft skinned military vehicles more than the armoured ones. The model keeps my interest alive by making them into rail trucks. I also know that at an exhibition no one else will have the same forms of motive power that I have, wonderful thing the imagination.
















The other two pictures illustrate some of the other oddities that have been built. I think however bizarre your imagination is it has probably already been done. The prototype for everything syndrome I suppose.

mosslake1
Registered
 

Joined: Sun Jan 16th, 2011
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 70
Status: 
Offline
Thanks for the great links Huw. The Ford railbus is interesting, something different from the other kits. That diecast truck reminded me that I have an old Matchbox Yesteryear Crossley truck at home that might be useful  (also a Rolls Royce armoured car, wonder how that'll look on railsL:).

 Those Bedford photos brought back a lot of memories....thanks mate:thumb:

Huw Griffiths
Registered


Joined: Wed Oct 21st, 2009
Location: Cwmbran, Wales, United Kingdom
Posts: 260
Status: 
Offline
Broadoak wrote: ... I was a Technical Artist many years ago.


I think I fancy something a bit more home built, as if it had been made in the farm workshops with limited funds and resources. I have not decided finally yet, I like to get the feel of the kit first. I will however think of it as the Ford version that the farm picked up second hand after the war.


... I think however bizarre your imagination is it has probably already been done. The prototype for everything syndrome I suppose.

I'm not surprised about you having been a technical artist - capturing scenes (and details) as well as you've done takes a certain eye, which many people don't have. This is one reason why, when you build your new railtruck, I'm sure the finished product will be worth waiting for.

 
I don't want to sidetrack you, but I'm sure you sometimes get some "you'd never see that" comments at exhibitions about some of your motive power. Like you, I reckon you would see it all - and more. The issue is whether some people actually see (or believe) some of the more unusual stuff that runs on rails.

One thread on the SE Lounge forum recently caught my eye. Someone posted pictures of bulldozers converted to run on rails at a salt plant - these pictures were followed by a build of a detailed large scale model version (actually a couple of them):

http://www.7-8ths.info/index.php/topic,16682046.0.html

Some of the pictures in the o5m6.de site also looked pretty extreme - like tractors fitted with cabs from scrapped trucks.

I'm sure someone, somewhere, will have tried combining these ideas - with a "railed" tractor or bulldozer, fitted with a cab - but whether anyone would ever want to model it...

 
I've also seen a book about the Tatra T3 trams, which included a number of photos showing part-built tramcars being towed around the (now demolished) Prague tram factory on rails and accommodation bogies, behind some rather rough looking tractors. Later pictures showed similar scenes - but with the tractors replaced by conventional road trucks.


As for the "you'd never see that" brigade at shows, I'd love to know what they'd make of this picture - showing a lorry, fitted with rail wheels and towing passenger cars in service. If this isn't a case of "prototype for everything", I don't know what is:

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/201/503487640_d289a40e99_z.jpg?zz=1 


Changing the subject, I can see why that Bedford photo would have motivated you to start building critters (followed by a layout to run them on). OK, I might personally prefer vehicles to look a bit more pristine - but pictures like that do have a certain old world charm (emphasis on old).


Anyway, I think I've already taken more than enough of your time - so I'll let you get on with what you're doing.

All the best,

Huw.



EDIT:  Here's another example of "prototype for everything" - part way down the page on this link, there's a photo clearly showing a Simplex "tin turtle" working a train of passenger stock:

http://www.hfstephens-museum.org.uk/locomotives/traction-on-the-festiniog-and-whr.html

Last edited on Sat Feb 5th, 2011 06:53 pm by Huw Griffiths

Huw Griffiths
Registered


Joined: Wed Oct 21st, 2009
Location: Cwmbran, Wales, United Kingdom
Posts: 260
Status: 
Offline
mosslake1 wrote: The Ford railbus is interesting, something different from the other kits. That diecast truck reminded me that I have an old Matchbox Yesteryear Crossley truck at home that might be useful  (also a Rolls Royce armoured car, wonder how that'll look on railsL:).

 Those Bedford photos brought back a lot of memories....thanks mate:thumb:

I'm not sure what scale those Matchbox models are - are they about O scale - are they a lot smaller - or are they a mix?

I don't know. I also don't know if it really matters - ultimately, there's only one person they've got to look right to (and it's not me) ...


To be honest, I've had my eye on another diecast from the same series as the one I linked to:

http://www.anticsonline.co.uk/2198_1_105746500.html

It would probably be too small to do an Isle of Sylt style conversion, like in the link in my last post - but I'm sure I could come up with something just as creative. The question is whether I decide to. A lot of model makers suffer from this "more ideas than time" ailment - why should I be any different?


I'm sure I'll come up with something sometime - who knows, it might even get built.

Anyway, all the best with your project - whatever it is. I'm sure it'll turn out fine.

Regards,

Huw.

mosslake1
Registered
 

Joined: Sun Jan 16th, 2011
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 70
Status: 
Offline
Huw Griffiths wrote: One thread on the SE Lounge forum recently caught my eye. Someone posted pictures of bulldozers converted to run on rails at a salt plant - these pictures were followed by a build of a detailed large scale model version (actually a couple of them):

http://www.7-8ths.info/index.php/topic,16682046.0.html

,

Huw.


They look familiar, possibly from an article in the Narrow Gauge & Short Line Gazette in recent years. Interesting though...

Herb Kephart
Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 5981
Status: 
Offline
Hey Don

That link weighs more than the "thing" in the picture!!


Herbie  :old dude:

Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline

Huw,


It is surprising but very few people say you wouldn’t see that when one of our rail trucks appear. I have a few photos to show those with doubts, but there seem very few.


In fact the only rivet counter we have come across in thirty shows was concerned that the tractor lubrication chart on the wall showed the wrong type of mudguards (fenders). I copied the chart from a Fordson handbook so it is correct. Although to be fair to the guy Fordson did change the mudguards when the tractor went into production.

Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline


Huw,





It is surprising but very few people say you wouldn’t see that when one of our rail trucks appear. I have a few photos to show those with doubts, but there seem very few.



In fact the only rivet counter we have come across in thirty shows was concerned that the tractor lubrication chart on the wall showed the wrong type of mudguards (fenders). I copied the chart from a Fordson handbook so it is correct. Although to be fair to the guy Fordson did change the mudguards when the tractor went into production.

Huw Griffiths
Registered


Joined: Wed Oct 21st, 2009
Location: Cwmbran, Wales, United Kingdom
Posts: 260
Status: 
Offline
Peter,

I'm glad to hear that.

I certainly think your models look great - and very credible.

The reason for my comment was the way that a minority of people visiting exhibitions sometimes seem to go into "hypercritical mode" every time they encounter a model that isn't a museum standard rendition of the one prototype and location they're familiar with.

Even if they were ever to find their idea of model railway perfection, some of these guys still wouldn't be happy - it's enough to make me wonder why they go to exhibitions in the first place.

Strangely enough, these ... erm ... gentlemen don't do layouts. Still, if they did, isn't it reassuring to know that they'd probably be the best layouts in the world?

I was just hoping you didn't get a lot of trouble with these trolls.

Anyway, I'll let you get on with what you're doing.

Regards,

Huw.


Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline

This is the latest project I am currently working on. Is it a critter? It’s hard to say. Although it looks home built it was made by Muir- Hill in Manchester around 1940.


I have got a Scaledown white metal kit of a Fordson Major 27N which is very heavy. I’m in the process of making a plasticard chassis for the tractor body to sit on. Then finding some practical way of fixing the Tenshodo power bogie to it.


Note in the picture the exposed drive chain, imagine what health and safety would make of that. Mine will have a guard to protect my plastic people.


The prototype worked on The Ashover Light Railway in Derbyshire. The line was two foot gauge and had a mix of internal combustion engines and four Baldwin 4-6-0 tank engines 


Huw Griffiths
Registered


Joined: Wed Oct 21st, 2009
Location: Cwmbran, Wales, United Kingdom
Posts: 260
Status: 
Offline
Peter,

I think Muir-Hill tractor-based locos qualify as critters.

As for the exposed chain, I wonder if the photo is of a machine awaiting maintenance, or on a scrap line. My reason for thinking this is that I've seen a number of pictures (photos and drawings) of chain-driven critters, with covers enclosing the chains.

 
I don't know if you've come across these links - showing a Muir-Hill being restored on the Abbey Light Railway:

http://www.freewebs.com/abbeylightrailway/no9.htm

http://www.freewebs.com/abbeylightrailway/Muir%20Hill.jpg

I also came across this picture:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/28652222@N03/3441332029/


What strikes me from some of these pictures is that the chassis is effectively a hollow box, with axles wheels and drivetrain dropped into it. I haven't tried this - but I can't help wondering if it might be feasible to fit the SPUD in a similar way:

1.  A plastikard false floor, with suitable cutout (or fixing hole) in the centre, to allow the SPUD to be fixed to it.

2.  Some angle, around the edges of the false floor - with sides and ends fitted to the angle - the sides and ends going below and above the false floor, creating a box which the tractor stuff can be dropped into.

Just my thoughts - I'm sure somebody will have better ideas.

Whatever the score, I'll be interested in seeing how this goes - I've got a few projects on the drawing board at the moment - and I'm trying to solve a number of the same technical challenges.


Anyway, I've no wish to hijack your thread.

All the best,

Huw.


Last edited on Sat Feb 5th, 2011 06:41 pm by Huw Griffiths

Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline

Huw,



Thank you for your interest and the links. I must admit I didn’t know about the one on The Abbey Light Railway.



There is a Muir - Hill Fordson preserved at Ravensglass with a small open cab.



I’m sure you are right about the chain being guarded when working on the Ashover example. The photo shows the device looking in a rather un loved state in what looks like a scrap line.



On the model I have made a plasticard frame with flat sides and a deck with suitable holes cut out to accommodate the engine sump etc .To hold the tractor body to this, it will be secured with both superglue and a small self tapper due to its considerable weight.



The Tenshodo bogie will have a plasticard mounting with a hole in the middle for holding the motor, the screw going downwards. There will be a hole at each end of the mounting for the screws going upwards into the chassis with the body attached. It is not very prototypical I know but the tractor I have is actually a later model so it will be my usual generic bodge.



Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline

A critter owned and built by my fellow operator Andy Knott using the Bachmann Davenport as a starting point. Andy has altered the radiator grille and made a new cab to give a little protection from the elements. It is rather unusual in that it is made from corrugated iron.

The critter made it debut at the St Neots exhibition, I have weathered it a little before the show opened. It still needs a little work I think, but it certainly looks different.

We were ably assisted all day by Thomas a youngster from the organising club and although he had never done any proper operation before performed very well.

It was good to see a youngster taking such an interest.






W C Greene
Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Royse City, Texas USA
Posts: 8253
Status: 
Offline
Peter-I really like your new critter! The corrugated metal and roll-down window curtains are just great. I know that she runs well, the Bachmann Davenports seem to never "miss a beat" when running. Very cool.

It's nice that you have a kid running trains also. Our little On30 group has met here before and the last time, I gave transmitters to the teens and they had a blast running while the old goats sat and talked about running. Get them involved.

                   Woodie

Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline


The Fordson Major 27n powered rail truck is the latest device to have come out of the farm workshop.


It is very loosely based on a device made by Muir Hill that provided the inspiration to build a similar device for my Two Sister‘s Farm layout.


I was given a damaged 1/32 scale white metal Fordson and having a photo of the Muir Hill device decided it would be an excellent starting point.


The model is powered by a WB35 Tenshodo bogie. This is held by one screw to a plasticard false chassis which in turn is held by two screws to the plasticard chassis that supports the white metal tractor body. The driver figure is a German tank crewman supposedly playing cards from Master Box.


The finished model is much higher from the rail top than the Muir Hill example due to the space taken up by the Tenshodo bogie. Therefore it is assumed an accident damaged tractor had a chassis built for it in the farm workshop. It is used for light shunting in the yard due to its relatively low power and its three speed gearbox.



It still needs a little more work on the weathering, I find the photos helpful.











Si.
Moderator


Joined: Thu Feb 23rd, 2012
Location: London
Posts: 5577
Status: 
Offline
Hi Peter

Great thread on your critters...
...and placky truck (lorry !) models (wink).

Been toying with the idea of the Tamiya LRDG 'pink panther' for a while now...
...that Chevy is a bute !

& WOW !!!...
...the GAZ does look very 'Anglo'...
...I know there were Ruskie copys of stuff made in WWII...
...I have an amphibious vehicle, which is.

The truck looks great 'on the farm' Peter !

All the best.

Cheers

Si.

Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline
Thanks for your interest Si.

The Russian kit was very inexpensive and nothing fitted very well. This didn't matter in my case as I only used a few bits of it. Even the box it came in was poorly made and fell apart on opening it.
You get what you pay for I guess.

I'm afraid the model shop where I bought the kit is no more, so now everything I need I either get at exhibitions or by mail order.

Peter M

W C Greene
Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Royse City, Texas USA
Posts: 8253
Status: 
Offline
Yes, quite a cool critter. I just love things like that anyway. I do agree about the Russkie kits, I have "built" 3 ZAVEDA (?) GAZ trucks and they all required lots of fiddling, cutting, filling, and setting on fire. I now have a great supply of "stuff" for future projects. And only one box came intact, the others were smooshed and it is a wonder nothing fell out!

Woodie

Si.
Moderator


Joined: Thu Feb 23rd, 2012
Location: London
Posts: 5577
Status: 
Offline
Zaveda ... Space Invader ... Darth Vader !!!

Anyone know which 1:35 truck-kit has the best engine ?

Idea being ... leave the hood on the truck SHUT; & bung the engine in a critter.

Just thought someone might know.

I quite like cheap & nasty kits...
...don't get 'the fear' when yer reach for the glue !

Cheers

Si.

There are some quite nice soft-skin military trucks etc.
Could be good for industrial mining & logging lash-ups !

Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline
Si I think the engine from the Tamiya GMC 6x6 kit is probably the best detailed engine in 1/35th scale I have come across. Although it would be an expensive way to get just the engine. If you could find a use for the rest of the kit it would make it a better buy as it is a very good kit.

There is a picture of the GMC engine on page 10 of the Two Sister's Saga in the narrow gauge section of this forum.
I can't get it to work in this post.


There is quite a good replica of a V8 in the Tamiya Quad gun tractor kit as well.

Peter M

Last edited on Thu Sep 12th, 2013 08:11 am by Broadoak

Si.
Moderator


Joined: Thu Feb 23rd, 2012
Location: London
Posts: 5577
Status: 
Offline
Hi Peter

Thanks very much for that !

I was looking on eBay last night, at trucks !

I realised the Chevy I liked...
...was in fact an SAS Land-Rover ... DOH !
The LR is OK; those LRDG SAS Chevy's are N I C E though.
I have the SAS Jeep kit here; waiting for something.

I then looked for 'small trucks'.
Saw 3 types of GAZ; the smallest looked very Model-T to me...
...middle sized one, bit bigger, more modern looking cab.
I'm guessing the engine (if they have one) is average at best.

Also saw a Revel 1:35 6-wheel Henshall (typo), German I figure from the name.
Looked like a pretty cool, oldie-stylee truck...
...but BIG !

I saw the tamiya 1:35 GMC 6x6 Peter.
Thanks for the engine tip; I will have a look at it.

I have a GMC 6x6 in 1:32 by Forces Of Valour...
...It's an absolute MONSTER.
I think even the Tamiya 1:35 one; would dwarf the On30 Shay I have, to convert to 1:35n2.

The Quad truck is a whakey-vehicle for sure.
As Herb says, very Star-Wars !
I thought the Quads were great as a kid...
...& made an Airfix 1:72 one (I think).
The detailed V8 sounds interesting.
I will see if I can find your pics Peter.

I am just getting back into modelling after a while away.
I was making 1:24, but found it to be a bit too big for me.
I guess I am trying to do something similar to you Peter...
...look for 'reasonable sized' models; in a 'large scale'.

Just had a dig through some older HO stuff here.
Pulled out an Athearn S-12 switcher !
I think she runs OK...
...a candidate for 'critterizing' for sure.

Am trying to 'size things' a bit before going NUTS with the saw.
Pictures & a thread soon, I hope.

All the best.

Cheers

Si.

Herb Kephart
Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 5981
Status: 
Offline
Klingy

Interesting thing about the Nash Quads

If one side of the vehicle went into a ditch----they couldn't get out!

With four wheel steer, any effort to steer the front wheels out, put the rear wheels further in--and vice versa.

My old man drove a Ford T ambulance in that dust-up, and said that it was almost comical when that happened.

Four wheel drive,and four wheel steer-- wonderful idea--that sucked!


How far off topic can I be, Commander?



Herburp

Si.
Moderator


Joined: Thu Feb 23rd, 2012
Location: London
Posts: 5577
Status: 
Offline
OT ... nar ... never

I didn't know they had 4-wheel steering Herb.

Sounds like Peter's move to ditch the steering...
...& get it on rails...
...is where the moneys at !

Only on FREERAILS !

Si.

:java::Salute::slow:

chasv
Registered


Joined: Mon Oct 24th, 2011
Location: Riverside, California USA
Posts: 882
Status: 
Offline
my brother has a 60's army mule (amo carrier) 4 wheel drive and steering in 4 wheel steering it is a hand full unless going slow

W C Greene
Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Royse City, Texas USA
Posts: 8253
Status: 
Offline
Detailed engines? Heck, just put plug wires, etc. on them and they look just right. Or use them as "junque" somewhere. I almost never put engines in my trucks/autos so I have a bunch of motors to use as "fine scale details"...yeah, right...

Woodie

Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline
Si I can thoroughly recommend the Athearn chassis, they are excellent.

I use four on Two Sisters and about a dozen on my HO switching layout Benson.

Peter M

Si.
Moderator


Joined: Thu Feb 23rd, 2012
Location: London
Posts: 5577
Status: 
Offline
Hi Peter

Thanks; I gave the Athearn a quick once-over last night...
...& A OK !

WOW ! about 22,000 Quad Tractors made...
...there must have been quite a few modded ones after WWII.

(I am very tempted; to try a 'open pick-up' version)

- - - - - - -

Been looking at your 'fleet' some more !
Apart from your more 'left-field' (no pun intended) motive-power...
...your more conventional 'Brit-Crits' (for want of a better term) are fantastic.

While I'm asking about kits...
...2 questions.

1. What is the basis of the grey critter, with the big-tank on the back-bed ?

2. What is the basis of the grey critter, with open back-bed, & small tank behind the cab; & what looks like a similar back to the Opel Blitz.
The cab has 'squarer doors' & look though.
?

Sorry; dunno how to describe them right !
I'm sure at 'The Farm' they have nick-names ?

All the best.

Cheers

Si.

Broadoak
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
Posts: 554
Status: 
Offline
Si, The truck with the tank on the back is the Zaveda Gaz Six wheel truck. The tank is a Walthers HO scale Oil tank. It Runs on a Con-Cor four axle chassis.

The other truck is an Italeri Opel Blitz gas producer, that runs on the same type of Con-Cor chassis as the device above.

The chassis by Con-Cor run very well, possibly a tad smoother than the Athearn but they are much more expensive of course.

I trust this is of some help.

Peter M

Si.
Moderator


Joined: Thu Feb 23rd, 2012
Location: London
Posts: 5577
Status: 
Offline
Hi Peter

Yes most helpfull !
I have a Con-Cor chassis from an ALCO as well; nice.

- - - - - - -

I have been totaly diverted this weekend...
...looking at military trucks !

I made an Airfix 8th Army Quad & 40mm Bofors AA trailer, in 1:72 as a kid.
Have also been to the Beltring Hop Farm in Kent, military show, with a friend a couple of times recently.
I kinda like the trucks, same as you.

He wants to get A TANK !!!!...
...his Misses isn't sure it's a good idea though.
(I'm NOT talking about a model-kit here Peter !)

However the Quads I clearly recall as a kid...
...were all fairground or circus tractors.
Repainted in typical '70s style fair/circus styleeee...nice !

I remember a big-blue & a big-red one from south-coast holidays !
I say BIG cos at 8 or 9, those things do look BIG.

Having seen lots of WWW photos of them now; they are in fact quite compact realy.

Anyhow Peter...
...I think I will get one of the Tamiya's...
...& see what happens with it !

I quite like the idea of a logging/mining company fire-engine with water trailer maybe.
Or perhaps a woodsy-style, with DIY logging-arch ?

Anyway...
...thanks for the inspiration Peter.
I am collecting bits & pieces of 1:32/35 stuff at the moment, for a possible layout.
I'm sure in time the Quad will find it's place.

All the best.

Cheers

Si.


UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems