Freerails Home 
Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Large Scale > First 'proper' post - my attempt at weathering a German 'Pig-Nose' Railbus

Freerails IS ACCEPTING new Members ... To join Freerails ... See how to Register as a Member in the 'Joining Freerails' Forum

 Moderated by: .  
AuthorPost
clive_t
Registered


Joined: Sat Jun 18th, 2011
Location: People's Republic Of Portsea Island, United Kingdom
Posts: 24
Status: 
Offline
Hello folks, well aside from the intro post, here is my first post on FR - hopefully the photo will show up correctly. I tend to host my own photos on Photobucket these days (standardised to 800 x 600), and link to them as necessary, so hopefully this will work on here too!

Just a simple 'before' and 'after' pair of photos:

Before:


After:



The weathering was one of my first attempts with an air-brush, having obtained a cheap compressor to power the thing. The paint was acrylic from my local Games Workshop outlet, which has a very wide range of colours - albeit with some pretty  weird names, e.g. snakebite leather (which is what I used here).

Hopefully these pics aren't too big in size for folks to see OK? They are pretty small in terms of file-size.

Cheers

Clive

Dwayne
Registered


Joined: Mon Mar 19th, 2007
Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma USA
Posts: 1057
Status: 
Offline
Looks good.  :thumb: Thanks for sharing.

W C Greene
Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Royse City, Texas USA
Posts: 8100
Status: 
Offline
I love it! We need more photos now that you have "got it down"...

"Another fine mess you got us into!"-Oliver Hardy

                                             Woodie

clive_t
Registered


Joined: Sat Jun 18th, 2011
Location: People's Republic Of Portsea Island, United Kingdom
Posts: 24
Status: 
Offline
OK, here's another attempt at weathering - this time, an RhB 2/2 Traktor:


Dwayne
Registered


Joined: Mon Mar 19th, 2007
Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma USA
Posts: 1057
Status: 
Offline
Looks good. Keep posting pics of your equipment and if possible the line itself.

One thing about the American large scale scene is that most adherents run BIG & LONGGGG trains... something that I have zero interest in. Lately I'm looking at the work done by folks over on the other side of the pond since railways tend to use shorter engines and freight cars and blend into the outdoor setting. I'm always on the search for how to incorporate that philosophy into my "American" style.

mabloodhound
Registered


Joined: Mon Apr 5th, 2010
Location: South Shore, Halifax, Massachusetts USA
Posts: 318
Status: 
Offline
I liked the clean and shiny railbus much better. Something that a company would be proud of to put on line for the commuter to ride.
The weathering reminds me of an abandoned vehicle that is no longer in use.

Herb Kephart
Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 5893
Status: 
Offline
Sorry Clive, but I have to agree with Dave on the railbus--it's a bit overdone for what the vehicle is, unless you where portraying a desert setting

The little shunter however, is spot on!

800X600 is the perfect size for posting here.

How about doing a series of photos on how you modify figures?


Herb  :old dude:

W C Greene
Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Royse City, Texas USA
Posts: 8100
Status: 
Offline
Clive-while I love nasty...here's something you might think about. For weathering, get rid of the airbrush and try some Bragdon weathering chalks. It is nearly impossible to overdo the effect and if you don't like the way it looks...wash it off! The chalk will stay on the model nicely unless you like to handle and mess with the model, then it may need some Dullcote, etc. to keep it on. I don't use an airbrush for weathering any more, I do custom painting and the clients prefer the effects of the chalk more than airbrushed weathering. This is only my opinion and again, if you ask 50 modelers about this, you will get 62 answers.

                       Woodie

sledhead
Registered


Joined: Wed Jun 23rd, 2010
Location: Wisconsin USA
Posts: 185
Status: 
Offline
It reminds me of the vehicles in Iraq right after a dust storm. So it's perfect if you're in the desert!

clive_t
Registered


Joined: Sat Jun 18th, 2011
Location: People's Republic Of Portsea Island, United Kingdom
Posts: 24
Status: 
Offline
Hello again folks - thanks for comments, sorry I've not been back so soon after, work did rather get in the way

I guess that dust, like beauty, is very much in the eye of the beholder - what works for one won't necessarily work for someone else.How much is too much?

My own personal view is, it's my impression of how a vehicle would look if it were a little overdue for a trip to the wash-down facility, but not exactly derelict. It was one of the first things of any value that I dared to weather - up to that point all my weathering had been done purely on freight stock. I guess like many, I model to my own experiences and view - it's why the hobby is home to such diverse interests covering different eras, different continents, different loads (passenger, logging etc) - and long may it be so.

There was a time, certainly in British Railway history when locos were their crews' pride and joy - and they would most certainly given their cleaners a hard time had it not been kept in tip-top condition. If you've ever had the misfortune to travel regularly on the remains of our rail network these days, you'll count yourself lucky that your train shows up at all, never mind on time - turning up in absolute pristine condition would for most be a dream too far! In modelling terms, presenting an 'ex-works' perfect item of stock would be achieved simply by shaking the contents of a box onto the tracks, and taking a photo of that. Nothing wrong with that, of course; whatever floats your boat. Time was when I would have happily done so, but I guess like many, with time my interests in this hobby have altered slightly.

In all honesty I don't think there is any right or wrong 'colour' for grime or dirt - by its nature it will be comprised of all manner of things, both natural and man-made. It follows that there will be variations in shade and colour depending on a whole host of factors - including geographical location, of course. This is true even in different parts of Britain.

I have tried chalks for weathering, but I just didn't get on with them - invariably I ended up weathering myself more than the model. That's not to say I will never return to trying them, though - if I ever see any for sale where I happen to be, then chances are I will get some.

Sorry for the somewhat verbose and jumbled response, it's been a difficult week and in particular a long day!

Dwayne
Registered


Joined: Mon Mar 19th, 2007
Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma USA
Posts: 1057
Status: 
Offline
You just need two of them... one clean, one dirty. :)

clive_t
Registered


Joined: Sat Jun 18th, 2011
Location: People's Republic Of Portsea Island, United Kingdom
Posts: 24
Status: 
Offline
Gets my vote! How soon can you send it?:)

Dwayne
Registered


Joined: Mon Mar 19th, 2007
Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma USA
Posts: 1057
Status: 
Offline
clive_t wrote: Gets my vote! How soon can you send it?:)

Considering the cost of the little buggers, how 'bout.... Never! You'll just have to deal with the one you've got. :P

W C Greene
Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Royse City, Texas USA
Posts: 8100
Status: 
Offline
Clive-there may be a way to remove the weathering without messing with the paint. Depending on the type of acrylic paint (Floquil, etc), it may be possible to use that windshield washer fluid applied with a Q Tip to disolve some of the paint. Try it on a small area to see how it works. I know you didn't like chalks, but you didn't mention whose chalks. Bragdon makes fine chalk powders with dry adhesive which works great. Just my idea.
Woodie

clive_t
Registered


Joined: Sat Jun 18th, 2011
Location: People's Republic Of Portsea Island, United Kingdom
Posts: 24
Status: 
Offline
I tried looking for stockists of Bragdon's powders, and there doesn't seem to be anyone in the UK selling it. I think the last time I tried I used "Carr's Weathering Powders" - with not a huge amount of success, it must be said. I was told a little while ago that Testor's Dullcote had been banned from sale in the EU, over some safety issue or other. I've just found a site though that claims to be selling an EU-legal version of it now, so I might just try. If anyone on here knows anywhere in the UK where I can get hold of these Bragdon's powders, I'd appreciate you telling me.

Herb Kephart
Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 5893
Status: 
Offline
Clive-

PM our member "Rich"- he sells the powders, along with some very nice laser cut stuff, not in your scale, but very nice, non the less. If the details of payment-etc can be worked out, I think that you might be able to get them from him--He is a great guy.


Herb  :old dude:

slateworks
Registered


Joined: Wed Oct 6th, 2010
Location: Twickenham, United Kingdom
Posts: 948
Status: 
Offline
Clive - I think you can obtain Testors Dullcoat fom Paul Martin at EDM Models (NGTrains). When I couldn't find Bragdons Powders in the UK, I tried Langley Models powders, 12 quite decent colours for around £16 (a similar cost to Bragdons) and £2 postage. Not very tacky used as a dry powder but mixed with a little 70% IPA and "dry brushed" onto the surfaces, they produced a very good efect (to me anyway).

Doug

teetrix
Registered
 

Joined: Sat Nov 29th, 2008
Location: Germany
Posts: 264
Status: 
Offline
A friend of mine used a sort of make-up powder from his wife. To avoid trouble, he used to buy his own box. He went to a (quite expensive) cosmetics store and ordered it. Instantly all the ladies starred at him, and to justify his need, he added: "I just need it for weathering..." :bg:

Back to the topic: The weathering is a little bit heavy, but I like it - especially the area cleaned by the wipers...

Michael

clive_t
Registered


Joined: Sat Jun 18th, 2011
Location: People's Republic Of Portsea Island, United Kingdom
Posts: 24
Status: 
Offline
Earlier this week i managed to get hold of some more Carr's weathering powders. If I get a chance I will give them another try. In the meantime, can anyone point me at any online resources for techniques for using weathering powders generally?

Thanks for all responses by the way.


UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems