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Tie Hackers Cabin - 1:48 Scale - Diorama Kit Build
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 Posted: Wed Oct 26th, 2011 05:10 pm
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mabloodhound
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This kit is as close to scratch building that a kit can be.
It is all made from strip-wood, that you supply.

The kit from Rusty Stumps includes a detailed instruction manual and a number of castings.
In my case, I cut my own strip-wood from scrap 3/4" pine board that I had on hand.
A list of needed materials is supplied and you could also purchase the strip-wood from Northeastern or Kappler etc.

I built this to verify the kit instructions for Walt.
After the kit was finalized and released, I altered it as you will see below.

First was the floor framing.
Walt supplies the template for the kit.
I put plastic wrap over that and just glued up the pieces.
The final assembly came off the plastic with no problems.





Next was to add the flooring.
I had pre-stained it using a brown AI mixture.





The wall framing was assembled the same way on the templates.








One thing I did differently in this version was to make up the trusses using a jig.
I wanted the roof removable and needed more trusses than the manual recommended.

After making one truss following the template, I used styrene scraps to make the jig.
I then could glue up the parts in the jig and the wood glue won't stick to styrene.

If I build from styrene parts, I use a wood jig because the glue won't stick.





These are the wall framing with siding attached.
I brushed two different colors of stain on, darker on the outside and brown inside.
The interior never gets the weathered color of the exterior.





The assembled walls came next.

I had made up the windows and doors beforehand.
These are supplied in the kit as laser cut parts.
I painted them and added the glazing.

You'll also see a side door which is a modification I made to the kit.
My intent for the addition is it will be the kitchen and needed a separate door.





The next was to put the roof on.

I marked a location for the trusses and glued 2 of them to the underside of the supplied laser cut main roof.
I then glued a truss to the rear roof and glued the addition roof to the main one.
Then I went back and finished gluing in the remaining trusses.








The shed was built in the same way.











While waiting for glue to dry, etc. I painted the stone foundation and chimney.

I used a gray Wal Mart primer and then painted a DecoArt brand sand paint over that to give it some texture.
Then I went back and dry brushed various stones in different colors that field stones might be.





In my rush to finish this along with another diorama for CSC2011, I neglected to take more photos.
But I'm sure you can fill in the steps.

The base is blue foam, carved to create a hill, covered with drywall mud, smoothed out and painted with a latex flat black.
I covered the entire base with fine earth, sifted from dirt under my barn.
I also added small stones to indicate rocks and boulders.

I laid out the foundation and glued it in place using foam safe construction adhesive.
The stone piers are from an extra chimney that I got from Walt, cut into 3' heights.
The original manual calls for wood posts in those positions.





You'll have to imagine all the next steps but this is the final result.

The 'grass' is some course flock I had on hand.
Not the best but it will have to do for now.

Same with the trees.
They are some I bought on greed-bay a few years ago, so I covered the gaudy leaves with some fine light flock.

I also bought some 'flower' flocking at the EXPO2011 and added those.

I also need to improve my weathering skills.
I used chalks for this and will experiment some more after the show.
At least the final impression is there.  

I still need to add some 'hacked' ties and spread some 'hacking' (shavings) around.



















Jimmy Simmons also built this kit but he followed the manual exactly.
His weathering and trees is something to see.  


:cool:




____________________
Dave Mason
D&G RR (Dunstead & Granford) in On30
“All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.” ~ Thos. Jefferson
“Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not.” ~ me
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 Posted: Mon Dec 5th, 2011 03:52 am
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Lynn
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This is a nice kit as I'm finding out first hand, I got this in ho as well as many other kits from Walt.

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 Posted: Mon Dec 5th, 2011 05:27 am
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titus
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Nice!

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 Posted: Mon Dec 5th, 2011 07:04 pm
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mabloodhound
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I had this on display at Walts booth during this years Craftsman Structure Convention.
The O scale kit requires that you supply your own strip-wood.
But the castings and laser cut roof are included as well as plan sheets and a thick manual.







____________________
Dave Mason
D&G RR (Dunstead & Granford) in On30
“All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.” ~ Thos. Jefferson
“Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not.” ~ me
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 Posted: Tue Aug 27th, 2013 12:14 am
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Si.
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Hi Dave

Great build on the diorama !
It's in my gallery !

I read that you cut your own stripwood from 3/4" board.
I would love to be able to do this.
I have cut bigger stuff over the years on 'regular' table-saws...
...But obviously something a bit finer is needed for this.

I friend of mine had a 'modellers' table-saw...
...but it was seriously under-powered.
Kinda OK for striping 1/8 & 1/4 stuff...
...but not generaly great.
I'm sure slightly higher power ones are available.

Do you have a saw recomendation Dave ?
What dia. blade are you using ?
How many teeth does it have ?

Any tips or pointers on this most welcome.

I have 2 spare, powerfull, hand-held saws...
...I have considered making a table for one of them.

I'm guessing maybe a 4" blade with maybe 10 teeth/" is about what I might need ?...
...or just get a decent purpose-made modellers table-saw ?

Any answers most welcome Dave...
...& anyone else who has good saw/blade advice.

Cheers

Si.



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http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=7318&forum_id=17&page=1

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 Posted: Wed Aug 28th, 2013 12:49 am
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mabloodhound
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Si,

Thanks for the compliment.

I'm still cutting strip-wood on my full size table saw.
BUT ... I use a 'Theryu' - Thin Kerf - 7¼" - 52 tooth blade.

http://www.mytoolstore.com/tenryu/thinke.html

I make my own plate for the saw blade so there is NO gap on either side when I run the wood through.
When ripping thin stuff, I only go half way and then turn the stock around to rip from the opposite end.

Gotta watch the fingers, you know.

:bg:

I also use decent, straight grain pieces of wood, no longer than 3 feet, and none of that crappy finger jointed stuff.
Mostly pine is my choice but occasionally some other softwood.
Hardwoods are difficult to cut into thin pieces.




____________________
Dave Mason
D&G RR (Dunstead & Granford) in On30
“All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.” ~ Thos. Jefferson
“Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not.” ~ me
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 Posted: Thu Aug 29th, 2013 05:21 am
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Si.
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Hi Dave

Thanks very much for your blade advice.

My dia. & TPI 'guess' was probably way out, I know...
...a guy cut some v.small plexiglass strip for me a while back...
...and he seemed to have a blade similar.

I have struggled with only bog-std. rip-blades...
...wobble & TPI & table-gaps, have ALL been issues.

I see the company that makes your blade; pride themselves on 'low wobble'; great !

I will have a look for a decent supplier in the UK.
Saw blades I have seen so far, are not suitable.

I think one of the old hand-held power-saws, on it's own no-gap table; just for modelling wood; is what I will aim for.

Am getting back to modelling after some time away from the hobby.
I used to have a few favorite & local materials suppliers...
...but they have all closed...
...and simple stuff like stripwood; seems hard to get !

Cheers

Si.

Great build again Dave !
& yeah...
...I'll watch my fingers !



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' Mysterious Moose Mountain ' - 1:35n2 - pt.II
http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=7318&forum_id=17&page=1

' M:R:W Motor Speedway !!! ' - 1:32 Slotcar Racing Layout
http://www.slotforum.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=59295&st=0&a
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 Posted: Fri Aug 30th, 2013 04:34 am
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thtroll
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Dave.

I love the diorama, beautiful job on the weathering and landscape.
I love the fact that you milled you own lumber.

Have you tried ripping hemlock?
It has a straight grain and it's not too hard.
I was thinking they would be good tie and bridge material.
The slivers sting like heck though.



Si.

I built a sled for my band saw and have been experimenting with various branches.

I square up the material and run it through like a small saw mill.
The fence is on the opposite side and set to the thickness I want to rip.

The limiting factor, is the length of the material maxes out at 6 inches.
Or I could build a longer sled I guess.




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Heath.
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 Posted: Fri Aug 30th, 2013 12:41 pm
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mabloodhound
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Thanks Heath.

Never tried hemlock for model work but I did a lot of 1:1 building with it.
It was very plentiful where I grew up and the saw mills cut a lot of it, primarily for sheathing and studding.
Bandsaw will do a good job of cutting your strip-wood and less likely to have an accident.

:2t:




____________________
Dave Mason
D&G RR (Dunstead & Granford) in On30
“All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.” ~ Thos. Jefferson
“Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not.” ~ me
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 Posted: Sat Aug 31st, 2013 02:22 am
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Rowan
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Great work with the diorama mate.

Cool !


Rowan


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