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Cutting Your Own Strip Wood
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 Posted: Tue Nov 22nd, 2011 09:51 am
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chasv
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I have used my 10' table saw with a fine panel blade down to a little less than 1/8 " . I made a new plate for the blade and put a strip of an old car door magnet on the fence to get rid of the gap under it. also a push stick as i still have all my fingers and don't want to loose any.



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 Posted: Wed Nov 23rd, 2011 09:51 am
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Herb Kephart
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Car door magnet idea is a winner---good thinking.

And yes, so is a push stick--even with one of the small model building saws.



Herb 



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 Posted: Sat Jan 21st, 2012 09:22 pm
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Tom Keller
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Nice work. I take it you're a woodworker too.

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 Posted: Sat Jan 21st, 2012 10:52 pm
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chasv
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redwood or fence cedar cut the best for small stuff. i have the leftovers from a fence that was torn down cut it right and it is already weathered



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 Posted: Thu May 3rd, 2012 07:04 am
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TK1
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Hi,

I know this thread is a few months old, but I'm new here and this is one of the few areas I can possibly contribute. So I thought I'd just chip in...hopefully this will be helpful.

It's easy enough to mill your own wood, as the other posters have attested to. I've used a Proxxon saw as shown in the previous post, but it just depends how close to a log your initial timber is. Ship model builders will often start with a log and work down to 1mm x 3mm strips, for example.

Aside from a fine circular saw, a small/medium bandsaw is great. A bandsaw can rip down a log or large billet, and then with a decent fence (even home-made) can cut thin strips. Apart from pine, myself and other ship builders use apple, pear, cherry, huon pine, and any other close-grained wood. This is the important thing for scale work, having close-grained wood so it doesn't look over-scale.

If your finance allow, look into buying/building a thickness sander - Google Jim Byrnes Model Machines for an excellent drum/thickness sander (and tablesaw). Once ripped on a saw, the sander will sand to exact thickness and remover marks/fuzz. Sure, you can do this by hand, but more efficient with a machine.

Search model ship scratchbuilding forums for tools and ideas for milling your own lumber. Much cheaper than purchasing and you can get the exact size and type you want. And it means I can make structures out of redwood, pine, cedar, etc for some character rather than just balsa or basswood.

Happy to show the process or elaborate if anyone's interested. Or I'll just go back into my corner with my red wine :)

Regards,
Darren



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 Posted: Thu May 3rd, 2012 09:48 am
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Herb Kephart
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Darren--

As gently as possible, I removed your duplicate posts

Thanks for the ideas--I have thought about a thickness sander for a long time. I know that Micro-Mart sells one, but I have been disappointed in most of the power tools of theirs that I have bought, or tried. I'm going to look into the link you gave.

Herb 



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 Posted: Thu May 3rd, 2012 07:54 pm
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TK1
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Hi,

Thanks Herb.  Not sure how I posted twice, but could have been influenced by the red wine !

Drum/thickness sanders are fairly easy and cheap to make too - plenty of free plans on the web.  They're a reat asset when milling wood as you can get the scale size exact and not as dangerous to trim thin strips as on a big tablesaw.

My process tends to be:

1. Rouch cut logs with chainsaw
2. Square up and cut into bilets with tablesaw (10" Ryobi cheapy)
3. Mill into scale lumber with bandsaw (old Ryobi 9" with home-made fence) and now with Proxxon FET tablesaw
4. Finish dimensioning and sanding with Byrnes thickness sander

Takes a little while, but I reckon I will easily recover the tool costs compared to buying commercial scale wood, and I can make any size rather than compromising, and use a variety of species.

Regards,
Darren



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 Posted: Fri May 4th, 2012 03:01 am
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rich
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check for a thread on AMR by the Train Clown if I remember right. He made a strip wood cutter using a DREMEL. Have not made one myself but it did look like it would work great.
He might have even posted it on RLF also.
rich

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 Posted: Fri May 4th, 2012 10:16 am
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Herb Kephart
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Being a machinist, I built one at one point, but even though the drum ran true within a couple tenths of a thousandth of an inch, I could never get the abrasive joint to not leave marks of some sort. Perhaps I was being too picky.

I might try again, when I get the zillion things that are more important beat into submission, but this time I'm going to try an abrasive belt running over a stationary platen, so that there is more than line contact with the work.

Didn't think of winding the abrasive strip on in a helix, as one of the on-line sites suggested, perhaps that might be the answer to the drum setup--but I think that the belt stands a better chance. Commercial belts are made so the splice is slightly thinner than the rest of the surface.

Shouldn't be such a problem for me-- I have an abrasive personality--right Woodie?

Herb 



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 Posted: Fri May 4th, 2012 11:26 am
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mabloodhound
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A good suggestion, Herb.   I bet a belt sander firmly mounted over an adjustable table height would work real well.   Think I'll check into that.



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