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A Shunting Plank
 Moderated by: Herb Kephart Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  Next Page Last Page  
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 Posted: Thu Jan 26th, 2012 06:56 pm
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matador
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Well

Im a Yorkshireman in the USA  I have a Class 20/25/26 I have just sold my Steamers and am putting together a Scottish Branch.

 I have just ventured into On30 and really enjoying it

David

 a Yorkshireman  in the USA

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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2012 06:12 am
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Broadoak
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I have done a little more work on the shunty plank, nothing major just a bit more work on the scenic side and details on the steam locomotives. I’ve also finalised the end backscene to blend in with the other. I’ve kept it very simple which to my mind seems to work best.

I have taken some pictures to illustrate the progress so far.



I am still not decided on the final position of the coal merchants staithes for instance so they are not glued down. They look almost abstract in the picture which makes the wooden sleepers look lighter than they really are. It is a simple structure made of balsa wood strips cut the same size as sleepers with card to represent metal reinforcement.





A couple of shots where a BR 57xx is seen shunting wagons in the yard, sorting a van from the farmers co-op.


Peter M



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Peter M
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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2012 09:22 am
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Broadoak
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These two pictures show a couple of additions to the low relief farmers co-op building. They are a goods dock platform and roof to help add a little interest to this area.

I have now added crew figures to all the steam outline locos, not easy to get hold of so they are all re-painted German figures actually.

I have also added a slacking or pep pipe to the fireman’s side of the pannier hanging through the side rail. It is a silly little addition really but I think helps to set off the model. I will add a bucket and fire irons to the brackets at the back of the cab later.

The loco is seen shunting a van destined for the farmers co-op building.





Peter M



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Peter M
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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2012 10:43 am
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Herb Kephart
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Peter

"a slacking, or pep pipe on the side of the pannier"

Thought that I was pretty fair at translating Brit-talk---see how wrong you can be?

A pannier, to me, is a container of some sort, usually found mounted either side of the rear wheel of a motorbike.

Pannier = saddlebag in US

motorbike = motorcycle in US

So how about translating the top line for the benefit of us in the Colonies?

Thinking that it might be something akin to a "pilot relief tube" (US aircraft lingo)?

If so, crews in England must be far more modest than the ones working for railroads in this country, who would just stand at the top of the cab steps and let it hang out-- and hope that the results evaporated before it got to any open car windows.

Herb 



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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2012 11:31 am
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Broadoak
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Sorry about that Herb hopefully I can explain.






Firstly the slacking or pep pipe, is a flexible rubber hose with metal wire reinforcement wrapped round the outside. It was connected by valves to the cold water supply and live steam from the boiler. It was used to spray the coal with water to lay any dust. It was also used to wash the footplate floor boards clean of spilt coal. They even used it to run hot water into a bucket so the crew could have a wash.



The panniers are the side tanks filled with water on this particular class of locomotive, the Great Western Railway had hundreds of them.



Hope this helps.





Peter M



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Peter M
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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2012 11:41 am
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Herb Kephart
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Thanks, Peter

and

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!


Herb 



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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2012 11:50 am
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Broadoak
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Thankyou for the birthday greeting Herb.





A busy scene in the yard with both the pannier and the 48XX shunting wagons, this loco also has a slacking pipe hanging down on the fireman’s side of the cab.

Note the locomotive coaling stage opposite the water tank. It is scratch built with a brick base, concrete top and wood and corrugated iron sides and back. It is very loosely based on several different ones that I liked the look of.

Still a lot more work to do with ground cover etc as can be seen.

Peter M



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 Posted: Mon Apr 2nd, 2012 12:05 pm
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Broadoak
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Two pictures showing the 48xx 0-4-2 tank with a re-painted BR liveried auto coach. Andy Knott kindly gave me the coach which I have now put into service. The two together make a surprisingly long train.

This scene reminds me of when I was a lad and I came back from St Albans to Watford Junction one Sunday evening in the cab of a Stanier 0-4-4 tank no 41908 with the fireman. My dad was with the driver in the auto coach. It was odd to see the regulator moving all on its own. Happy days.

Peter M



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 Posted: Tue Apr 3rd, 2012 11:32 am
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Broadoak
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A few shots of my latest acquisition, a diesel wearing the livery of the transitional steam to diesel period. It is a model I am very pleased with. It runs superbly and I think looks rather good. I have weathered the bogies and added a third man in the no 2 end, and re-painted the existing crew with light blue overalls. I’ve also toned down the cream instrument panels to a dark grey, not that you can see much with the body on. She is seen working in the yard with a short train of various vans.

Peter M



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Peter M
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 Posted: Wed Apr 4th, 2012 02:34 pm
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Si.
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Hi Peter

Nice job on the layout.

Cheers

Si.



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