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Broadoak
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I have been thinking about a new project for the winter months when for four months I don’t work. Cold weather and racing cars or bikes don’t mix.

I have a small space available between the American HO switching layout and the corner where I keep the Two Sister’s Farm layout.

It measures 6 feet long and would be 6 inches wide at one end and fifteen inches wide at the other. It would in fact be bolted to the back of the Benson west yard by coach bolts.

By way of a change and because they are much improved nowadays it will be British outline.

I have at last made a tentative start on my shunting plank layout. It doesn’t have a name yet.

The location is somewhere on the Welsh and English borders, not sure where exactly.

Originally the small station and yard were on a line that carried on for some distance into Wales to an unnamed terminus. After the severe winter weather in 1947 flooding further down the line washed out a bridge and severed the route. It was decided that it would be uneconomic to repair the bridge so the track was lifted back as far as the station I am modelling. This section remains fairly busy because of a quarry and a military establishment. There is also still the local traffic in coal, cattle, sheep and general farm products both in and out.

The period modelled is the early 1950’s.

This could make a project for a beginner with little space who was interested in realistic operation.



A view looking down on the single track fiddle yard. The back of CC layout ( ore loader ) at top of photo can clearly be seen.



Road bridge hiding fiddle yard (a rather grand name for a piece of single track) and station platform.



Platform and station buildings with coal and builders merchants siding at the front.



Goods yard area, flats at back are a modified from a Metcalf brewery kit. Representing from left to right, Farmer’s Association Feed and Seed. Farmer’s warehouse and store and raised loading area for horses, cattle and sheep.



Looking into goods yard area, headshunt is the original line before the bridge washout in 1947. Pannier standing at water tower, I will probably add small coaling stage opposite.



Collet 0-4-2 with toad about to depart for mainline junction connection. Looking towards the entrance door which restricts fiddle yard width to one track.

Peter M

HOexplorer
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Peter, Nicely done.  This is good little layout with some interesting possibilities. Jim

Broadoak
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Thanks for that Jim I think it proves you don’t need a large layout to have interesting operation.

I think it would also work as an industrial park with an American fictitious short line.

A few more pictures to show what little progress has been made.



0-6-0 Pannier no 3711 arrives with a small goods working.

The locomotive is a slightly weathered Mainline model with a crew yet to be added.

The road bridge hides the one road fiddle yard.



3711 and its train rolls past the platform and a typical GWR corrugated iron pagoda hut.

The track and scenic dressing is at the very early stages with much yet to be done.



The minimal goods train pulls into the yard. The two wagons are Coopercraft kits.



3711 simmering at the platform while the crew go and get their tea cans filled with water.

Traingeekboy
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Nice to see a small British layout. This past year has been a year of British train obsessiveness for me; I love the tank engines in particular. I just recently won a LMS 2-6-4 in OO scale. Is your layout OO or HO?

Keep up the posts I always love seeing peoples layout pics. :)

Broadoak
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It is OO scale, here are a few more photos of another couple of tank engines.



Collet 0-4-2 no 4889 ready to depart with a small goods train. The locomotive is a Hornby model as yet un weathered and I’m pleased to say runs remarkably well. The station buildings and platform are all Wills kits.



A BR standard class 3 arrives with a van load for the builders merchants.

Another Mainline model weathered with a crew. It also runs very well and I must admit I like watching the valve gear working.

Still much to be done on the scenic side.



BR Standard class 3 no 82020 departs with a mixed freight for the junction with the main line.

Traingeekboy
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The class 3 is a nice looking beast. Very similar in shape to the one I am waiting delivery on.

i was just on a Brit forum and noticed some similar images there; ;) funny how we all cross paths on the various forums.

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A few more pictures of the standard class 3 prairie shunting the small yard one afternoon then leaving in the evening.

Peter M

 

 

Broadoak
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I have been making some coal staithes out of thin balsa. Whilst looking up a reference in my The Lambourne branchline book I came across a photograph which gave me an idea for another operation that had not occurred to me. It is a sad event but an excuse to run a model dmu special on the last few days of the lines operations before closure.

I happen to have in stock a Bachmann 108 which was an impulse buy on my part. I’ve always liked the first generation dmu’s and this livery I think suits it very well. This could be the ideal chance to give it a run.

It is simply a matter of it shuttling back and forth, but sometimes that is enough operation.

I suppose I’ll have to get a green early emblem 08 next and cover the activities between the early fifties and closure in the seventies.




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i like it nice job.:old dude:

Broadoak
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Thank you for taking an interest Charles.:bg:

I have only made a start so far but it makes a pleasant change from my USA switching layout and my narrow gauge exhibition layout.

I'm not sure how much interest there is in the States to British outline modelling.

Herb Kephart
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One of the things that I like about English locomotives, is that they kept colo(u)rfullness, long after companies in the States gave up the extra effort, and went to basic black.

I have to admit that I did not always feel this way, but like Isley Scotch, it has become an acquired taste.

Press on!

Herb.

Broadoak
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I’ve not done much work on the model other than painting a back scene using acrylics. I used 300gsm water colour paper as it remains fairly flat and hopefully will be easier to glue to the wall. It is not level at the bottom but temporarily held in place by Blue Tac to see what it looks like. I have now darkened the sky to match the other back scene a little better.

The picture shows the little Collet 0-4-2 shunting the yard. ( There are four of these attractive little locomotives preserved ) The vans are Ratio kits with 3 link couplings, I shall fit a tension hook to one end of each van later and run them in pairs.

I think I will build a loco coaling stage where the grounded brown van body is now.

At this stage nothing is finally decided position wise.




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Peter - I can see some really interesting swtching (...I mean shunting) opportunities for the layout. Looks great and the scenery is really coming along nicely. Thanks for sharing and keep up informed of any (and all) progress.

Ray

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Herb Kephart wrote:
One of the things that I like about English locomotives, is that they kept colo(u)rfullness, long after companies in the States gave up the extra effort, and went to basic black.

I have to admit that I did not always feel this way, but like Isley Scotch, it has become an acquired taste.

Press on!

Herb.


I feel the same way Herb, both about the locos and the SCOTCH! Mmmmmmm....

Traingeekboy
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Broadoak wrote:

The vans are Ratio kits with 3 link couplings, I shall fit a tension hook to one end of each van later and run them in pairs.



What are these three link couplers. Are they the kind that goes on for looks but do not get used or do you replace the standard hook couplers with those?

Broadoak
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Three link couplings are scale versions of the type of coupling used on loose coupled goods trains in the days of steam. They look good but are very fiddly to use on a model as they are very small. They don’t work well on sharp curves either so are not very practical on a small shunting layout like mine.



The tension hook couplers look pretty awful but work well and after a while you tend not to notice them.



As I’m getting older my eyesight is not as good as it used to be which is another reason for not using the scale three link couplers on all my stock.





I hope this all makes sense to you folk not familiar with British practice.

Herb Kephart
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Peter

While I follow the British modeling scene somewhat more than the average US modeler, I have heard of both types of couplings (and I think others also) but I'm not sure exactly which is which appearance wise.

Could you take a close up of each and identify as many as possible?

I believe that the "chopper" coupling is somewhat like the old US Mantua coupler, which was the defacto standard HO coupler before KD's appeared on the scene.
These resembled nothing that was used on the prototype here, but within its limitations operated very well--close to 100% of the time.

Herb 

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Herb, you old timey guy! Mantua couplers were made a little after Baker couplers, both had "loops and a stabber" affair which could be coupled and uncoupled in a more or less (less) "automatic" fashion. Of course, the two couldn't be used together..that's why the NMRA got into the fray with the "horn hook" nastiness which is still found on cheap 99 cent HO freight cars to this day. KaDee came out with the MKD (I believe they were called) which also used a ramp to uncouple. There was "auto" coupling and they looked like the present day #5, etc. except that instead of a curved uncoupling pin (magnetic), they had a straight pin from the knuckle for the ramp. Wheeew! You know what I am talking about. KaDee also had a version of the NMRA nastiness which had a magnet on the bottom of the coupler so it could be used with the magnets they sold. (corn-fused?) To my mind (very weak) the Baker couplers look quite similar to the Brit's "chopper" coupler and in fact, they may be "compatable" !!?? OK? Back then, John Allen used Bakers and Whit Towers used Mantuas..that's why they didn't get along with each other.

Now you know why I prefer pin & link couplers. They work with all other p & l couplers, no matter what! Now, for the next politically correct question........

Woodrow

Broadoak
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I don’t have a very expensive camera so the close ups are not very good but are the best I can do.






The first two pictures of the 0-6-0 pannier tank is fitted tension lock couplers which are fitted to all propriety stock when purchased in the UK. The model is actually one of the Bachmann Branchline range and comes with theses couplings as standard. These are rugged and easy to use.











The two wagons are in fact Ratio kits but are fitted with prototypical three link couplings just like the real thing used to be in the days of steam. These are much more delicate and need careful handling.





I hope this all makes sense Herb.





Incidentally when I first started modelling the American scene the cars and locos where fitted with horn hook couplers. I changed all mine to KD’s.

Herb Kephart
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Woodie-

Whit used Bakers also.  When I visited eons ago, he said that when Baker decided to quit, he, Allen and another fellow whose name I didn't recognize, bought the remaining stock.

Now, since we are playing 'member games, how about the Megow that combined the Mantua hook and loop into one totally useless piece? First of the Mantua ones were similar (pre Archie's war) had some of these--probably still have them somewhere, since anytime that I throw something away, I need it the following week--and that hasn't happened to them.

And remember the Walthers that sort of tried to work like the first KD's, with a diamond ramp?

Peter-

Thanks for the explanation. The first ones you showed were what I thought were called"chopper" couplers.

I take it that the three link, like our prehistoric link and pin, must be coupled and un coupled by hand

Herbacide 

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Well

Im a Yorkshireman in the USA  I have a Class 20/25/26 I have just sold my Steamers and am putting together a Scottish Branch.

 I have just ventured into On30 and really enjoying it

David

 a Yorkshireman  in the USA

Broadoak
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I have done a little more work on the shunty plank, nothing major just a bit more work on the scenic side and details on the steam locomotives. I’ve also finalised the end backscene to blend in with the other. I’ve kept it very simple which to my mind seems to work best.

I have taken some pictures to illustrate the progress so far.



I am still not decided on the final position of the coal merchants staithes for instance so they are not glued down. They look almost abstract in the picture which makes the wooden sleepers look lighter than they really are. It is a simple structure made of balsa wood strips cut the same size as sleepers with card to represent metal reinforcement.





A couple of shots where a BR 57xx is seen shunting wagons in the yard, sorting a van from the farmers co-op.


Peter M

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These two pictures show a couple of additions to the low relief farmers co-op building. They are a goods dock platform and roof to help add a little interest to this area.

I have now added crew figures to all the steam outline locos, not easy to get hold of so they are all re-painted German figures actually.

I have also added a slacking or pep pipe to the fireman’s side of the pannier hanging through the side rail. It is a silly little addition really but I think helps to set off the model. I will add a bucket and fire irons to the brackets at the back of the cab later.

The loco is seen shunting a van destined for the farmers co-op building.





Peter M

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Peter

"a slacking, or pep pipe on the side of the pannier"

Thought that I was pretty fair at translating Brit-talk---see how wrong you can be?

A pannier, to me, is a container of some sort, usually found mounted either side of the rear wheel of a motorbike.

Pannier = saddlebag in US

motorbike = motorcycle in US

So how about translating the top line for the benefit of us in the Colonies?

Thinking that it might be something akin to a "pilot relief tube" (US aircraft lingo)?

If so, crews in England must be far more modest than the ones working for railroads in this country, who would just stand at the top of the cab steps and let it hang out-- and hope that the results evaporated before it got to any open car windows.

Herb 

Broadoak
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Sorry about that Herb hopefully I can explain.






Firstly the slacking or pep pipe, is a flexible rubber hose with metal wire reinforcement wrapped round the outside. It was connected by valves to the cold water supply and live steam from the boiler. It was used to spray the coal with water to lay any dust. It was also used to wash the footplate floor boards clean of spilt coal. They even used it to run hot water into a bucket so the crew could have a wash.



The panniers are the side tanks filled with water on this particular class of locomotive, the Great Western Railway had hundreds of them.



Hope this helps.





Peter M

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Thanks, Peter

and

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!


Herb 

Broadoak
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Thankyou for the birthday greeting Herb.





A busy scene in the yard with both the pannier and the 48XX shunting wagons, this loco also has a slacking pipe hanging down on the fireman’s side of the cab.

Note the locomotive coaling stage opposite the water tank. It is scratch built with a brick base, concrete top and wood and corrugated iron sides and back. It is very loosely based on several different ones that I liked the look of.

Still a lot more work to do with ground cover etc as can be seen.

Peter M

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Two pictures showing the 48xx 0-4-2 tank with a re-painted BR liveried auto coach. Andy Knott kindly gave me the coach which I have now put into service. The two together make a surprisingly long train.

This scene reminds me of when I was a lad and I came back from St Albans to Watford Junction one Sunday evening in the cab of a Stanier 0-4-4 tank no 41908 with the fireman. My dad was with the driver in the auto coach. It was odd to see the regulator moving all on its own. Happy days.

Peter M

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A few shots of my latest acquisition, a diesel wearing the livery of the transitional steam to diesel period. It is a model I am very pleased with. It runs superbly and I think looks rather good. I have weathered the bogies and added a third man in the no 2 end, and re-painted the existing crew with light blue overalls. I’ve also toned down the cream instrument panels to a dark grey, not that you can see much with the body on. She is seen working in the yard with a short train of various vans.

Peter M

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Hi Peter

Nice job on the layout.

Cheers

Si.

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Been a while since I peeked in here. Looks good.... err, wait just a minute here... wots dat diseasle doing on the railway? L: he he he

Broadoak
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About two years ago I decided to dismantle Colonel's Crossing part and extend the Benson section of my American Switching layout.
The GWR shunting plank was mounted on the back of the joining section between CC and Benson. As I no longer needed a joining section I had to find a new home for the GWR plank.
I put it on the top of some cupboards on the opposite wall to the Benson layout. At long last I now have attached a fiddle yard and laid the track so operating can now be done in earnest. It is all very much a work in progress at the present time.

Hopefully the photos will show what the set up looks like now.





Peter M

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Looks good Peter :2t:. Do you have some photo's taken a bit closer to the layout? A bit more detail would be nice.

Alwin

Broadoak
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Thanks Alwin,

I will take some more pictures when I've done a little more work on the scenic side.

Regards Peter M

Broadoak
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I have done a little more work on the plank and taken a couple of pictures of my latest acquisitions. They are both Bachmann models and each one runs very well. They have been weathered very slightly. The purchases fit in with my modelling covering from the early fifties through to the mid eighties.
I think the small prairie is a re-vamped Lima model but I think it captures the look of the real locomotive very well.

I was worried about the tension lock couplers having KD's on all my USA stock but I have found whilst shunting I don't notice them.





Peter M

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Peter-

"tension lock couplers''

Photo please? Auto uncoupling?

Herb

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Herb,

You ask about tension lock couplings. They are fitted as standard to virtually all ready to run British outline stock when purchased.
They are made of plastic with a curved loop at the front and a plastic or metal hook at right angles to it. See photo of front of diesel shunter. The curved loops push against each other to prevent buffer locking. To uncouple you push an L shaped plastic tool under the hooks between the vehicles you want to un-couple this lifts each of the hooks. I know of no reliable method of automatic un-coupling.

The couplings that come fitted to modern British is much smaller than they used to be and therefore less obtrusive.

With the prototype in the period I am trying to portray the couplings would have been three link chains. The locomotive would have a special three link coupling with a screw thread to allow the stock to be coupled up tightly to the buffers, especially if the stock was passenger or vacuum fitted stock.

A few modellers in OO scale use scale three link couplers but they are tiny and very fiddly to use. They are a little more practical in O scale being that bit bigger.

I hope that makes sense.

Peter M

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Thanks Peter!

Closest thing over here would be the old Mantua couplers,. which uncoupled by a springy plastic ramp between the rails. Reliable as taxes, but didn't look like anything in the real world. When KayDee came along, the fact that they looked like std. American couplers, it finished Mantua--even though they weren't as reliable at that time, and are much more fiddly.

I'm familiar with the three link chain UK couplers---but would think twice before trying to use them in even 1/12 scale

Herb

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A few more pictures of the still un-named plank showing some recent second hand purchases.


A view showing a 57xx pannier tank behind the small coaling stage next to the concrete surface of the goods yard.
The yard surface is made of several layers of card glued to the base board surface. The top layer is an oversize piece of card placed face down on the track that has a coat of acrylic paint on the rail top. With gentle pressure downwards the paint marks the rail edges and the card is cut to the inside mark. The card then fits against the rail edges for a near perfect fit. When the glue is dry I gave the surface several coats of a light grey
concrete colour with thin washes to vary the colour. When thoroughly dry fine black lines drawn with a pen to
represent cracks on the surface were added.




Three pictures showing the 57xx shunting the yard in the mid 1950's.
I have fitted the small tension lock couplings to some Ratio kits that had three link couplings, not a practical proposition with my eyes. All the wagons have been lightly weathered with acrylic paint washes and chalk.
The Clee Hill Granite wagon makes me think the layout is set in the Ludlow area.

Peter M

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48xx and second hand B set with repainted very dark grey roofs and the bogies painted a very dark grey with a little brown colour added. The B set being almost compulsory if modelling a GWR branchline. This shot represents the very early 1950's.



45xx and B set early days of nationalisation again the early fifties. The photo is taken from the road over-bridge. With one brake end coach of the B set one can run a short mixed train, as with the real thing into the early 1960's.


BR class 3 standard with second hand con flat container wagon this would be the late fifties.

Peter M

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I have just completed the excellent Metcalfe card kit of Bradford on Avon station building, it's not the main building but the one on the west side to Bath. It is pretty large and fills my small platform very well, it gives the passengers protection from the rain as they get into the carriages as well. The GWR pagoda has been moved to the end of the platform, neither building is glued down but merely resting temporarily. I'm in the throes of touching up the raw card edges of the kit.



A couple of views showing the GWR 0-4-2 tank no 4869 with an auto-coach. It is the early 1950's but the locomotive is still wearing its original livery.




The Collet 0-4-2 is now seen bringing in a short freight. The shunting over we see a close up of the loco working back to the main line.

Peter M

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A 57xx 0-6-0 pannier tank arrives with a mixed goods train. A cattle wagon is marshalled next to the engine which indicates it is loaded with cattle. If the wagon is empty it can be put anywhere in the train.
I think these are a most attractive locomotive and can remember seeing them working empty carriage stock into Paddington Station on a spotting trip when I was a lad.



A class 3 Standard shunting a couple of wagons of animal feed in the mid 1950's.

Peter M

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Coming up to the years just before the closure of the line we see a class 108 DMU.
The model is a Bachmann and runs very well indeed. I have bodged a few details onto the buffer beams as they looked a little bare. The pagoda needs glueing in place and more scenic dressing added.



This shot shows the excellent laser cut detail of the iron work in the kit. The locomotive is a Bachmann class 8 0-6-0 shunter again seen shortly before the line's closure.

Peter M

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I have just treated myself to a model I have long admired and rather fancied for working on the plank.
It was at the Hemel Hempstead show I did last Saturday with Two Sister's Farm and it was on a second hand stall at a bargain price. The stall holder ran it for me, it didn't run very well, but as it was a low price I bought it.
On Sunday morning I cleaned the wheels and found that under the grime the wheel treads look as if the model has not had a lot of use. I cleaned out the perished traction tyres, they are not needed as it will only be pulling a single box van or horse box. I also removed the body and did a thorough lube job on the motor and bogies and re tested it again.

It now runs superbly, slowly and smoothly, far better than I expected it would. The next job is to add crew members and some seated passengers.






Peter M

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I have not posted anything on this thread for ages so this is an update.
I have been asked to do this on another forum, here are a few photos taken looking down to give an idea of the track plan.
When it was first built it was fixed to the back of my American layout joining section and was only six feet long, the right hand end. Over time it has just grown a bit and now I have relocated it.
It's just a bit of fun and somewhere I can run my selection of British locos and stock. The whole thing is about twelve feet long now.

I hope the rather poor pictures are self explanatory starting with the passing loop and long siding, this serves as a sort of fiddle yard. We then progress to the right and the station and yard area.










Peter M

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I have had a rethink about the Metcalfe station building, nice as it is, I think it is too big for my small station. I have now gone back to my assorted Wills kits, although I haven't fixed them down yet.
I have taken a few pictures of my 25/3, a favourite of mine and a bubble car that my old friend Andy Knott gave me that he had converted some years ago.









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The bubble car is seen leaving and heading for the junction.

Peter M

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My old friend Andy Knott had a clear out in his loft some time ago and he gave a couple of steam outline locos that he no longer wanted. The first, a Collet 0-6-0 is very useful to me as they were a popular branch line loco. The model was made by Mainline the precursor of Bachmann. I think the model had been dropped at some time because there was a little damage to the cab that I have now repaired. I have also added a couple of crew figures, being a Great western engine there are no doors between the loco and the tender.







A selection of photos of her working in the yard.

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This is the second loco, a class 4 Standard I was given by Andy and is an original Mainline job.
It didn't run very well at first but this was due mainly to paint on the wheel treads. Once this was cleaned a crew added and a bit of general touching up she performs quite well. Not quite as good as the latest offerings perhaps but not bad for twenty odd years old.











Peter M

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The Collet 0-4-2 I bought new, just because I liked it. What better reason is there than that.
The autocoach was another gift from Andy and is slightly darker than it should be really. Together though they make an attractive looking train.

The station now has a name, Willingford which I found in my scrap box, I can't remember where it came from, a Will's kit I suspect.






Peter M

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A BR Standard prairie I have never seen a real one. They never worked in the area I lived at the time, but I do like the look of them.
As a lad I lived close to Bushey troughs on the old LNWR main west coast line and saw the bigger 2-6-4 Brighton tanks on suburban trains regularly, in fact several were shedded at Watford.










Peter M

Herb Kephart
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Nice going Peter

Keep us in the ''loop'' (US that is, not necessarily UK)

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Thanks Herb, this is just a bit of fun, not to be taken seriously.
I find it very relaxing running trains from different eras.

This is another example of “I bought it just because I like it”.
This class 108 set originally had three cars but I only have got room for two.
It was a bargain from that large emporium in Liverpool. It's a nicely done model that runs well and looks better for the under frame and engine detail being picked out I think.









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This model brings things right up to date, in that it is my latest purchase. This is my second class 25 and I must say I love it. It looks right it runs very well, so I am very pleased with it. The 25's just seem to look right to me, purposeful and workman like I think.











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So to finish with a few photos of 25 043 shuffling a few wagons around Willingford.

Peter M

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This will be my last post on this thread.


After a great deal of thought I have decided to give up my internet connection.
I live in a tiny village and the use of aluminum wire in the telephone system causes all sorts of problems. Of late as the cost has gone up the service I receive has got worse, being very slow and often unusable.
As my only income now is my pension I think the money saved could be put to better use elsewhere.
I have enjoyed posting pictures and accounts of my layouts and will keep the PC for keeping and downloading my photographs.
Thank you all for the interest you have shown in my efforts over the years.


Regards Peter M


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Peter, I am sorry to hear this news! Is there any way that you can get a wireless connection (wifi)? I would believe that "the whole world" is connected now but I suppose you really can't trust what you read on the internet. We will miss you here and with your other threads and hopefully the powers to be will re-do the infrastructure so you can rejoin us. Take care.

Woodie

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Hi Peter

I know EXACTLY where you're coming from.
I live in 'London', but in fact in the country, right on the very edge of Greater-London.

I REFUSE TO PAY BRITISH TELECOM FOR A CRAPPY PHONE LINE & INTERNET !!
( read:- British TeleCON !! )

They are happy to lavish MILLIONS £££ on glitzy T.V. commercials featuring Hollywood movie stars...
...but can't seem to be able to put up a few new wires !

They promise the Earth & deliver NOTHING !
Check for speeds in your area, they say, YEAH RIGHT !!

I have as a result used a cellular system for Internet, for some years now.
Back in 2008, it was a tad expensive, but still WAY CHEAPER than a British TeleCON line-rental & Internet deal.
NOW it is in fact 'cheap as chips'.
Not good for Playstations(TM) or Netfix(TM), But I don't have time for that jazz anyhow, Too many cool models to make !!

Peter, in all seriousness, I have here TWO unused cellular-internet devices, which are compatible with Orange/T-Mobile, who are now called EE.
You've probably seen them, size of a cigarette-lighter, no battery, just plugs into the USB socket on your computer, software is in the device already.
If you can get an ( Orange/T-Mobile ) EE cellphone signal where you are, the device will work pretty well.
I would be more than happy to send one to you by Royal Mail for you to check out !!
It's so small it would go in an envelope for £1 First-Class post, I'll even pay the £1 !! since seeing Two Sister's Farm is worth a hell of a lot more than some stoopid movie !!

With a 'SIM-Card only deal' (you supply the device), from the local EE-shop, you should be able to buy enough data to use Freerails & other things quite a bit, for just £1, and top-up online easily when needed.
If you don't need the Internet much, you don't pay for it, simple as that !!
For Googleing, Freerails & hobby use alone, who actualy needs zillions of gigabytes per month anyway ?
Worked fine for me for years.

Peter YOU ARE NOT ALLOWED TO LEAVE FREERAILS !!
Especially due to the crappy service & overcharging of British TeleCON !

Send me a PM with your address.
The device is in the Royal Mail to you pronto.
If you don't have it, it's going to landfill, I don't need THREE of the damn things !!
Check out the cost of the SIM-Only situation with EE, their 'minimum amount situation' I think you will find is very good for 'light users'.

I just put the USB-cellphone device in an envelope & stuck a stamp on !!
Am waiting for it's new owners address !!

:moose:

Si.

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Peter, see my other post.

Hang in there please, Mate.


Herb


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