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The In-ko-pah Railroad
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 Posted: Fri Jul 28th, 2017 01:29 am
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mwiz64
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Ray,

The In-ko-pah is my favorite railroad to follow here at Freerails. As always, beautiful work!



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 Posted: Thu Oct 12th, 2017 02:18 am
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Ray Dunakin
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I've set aside my model of the Grizzly Bar saloon for now, and started work on a new building for the Mineral Ridge mine and mill. This will be the power house. It will eventually contain a diesel-powered generator, an air compressor for the mine, and possibly a blacksmith's shop.

The major components (walls, roof, etc) are made from 6mm Sintra:





This is the main room. There will be a smaller room added on one side. The floor is 3mm Sintra, and won't be glued in until after I get the roof installed:








The smaller room was also made with 6mm Sintra. I use these steel machinist's blocks to keep everything square:





Here, I've started adding the roof:





There are openings on the rear of each room, for access to the interior. The rear walls will be removable:





This is where the structure will sit on the layout:





Fitting the roof of the side room into the roof of the larger room was a bit tricky. I used scraps of Sintra and some Dynaflex 230 paintable sealant to fill the gaps:









Another shot of the structure temporarily placed on the layout:





The smaller room will only have one window, located close to the cliff, so there is no need to detail the interior there. But the large room has multiple windows, making the interior fairly visible. The interior is built as a separate model that slides into the rear of the building. Because the exterior will be clad with corrugated metal, for the interior I am simulating the appearance of a a wood-framed structure. The interior walls are scribed to give it a little bit of a corrugated look. The framework is built up out of strips of styrene:













That's all for now. Enjoy!



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 Posted: Thu Oct 19th, 2017 02:39 am
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Ray Dunakin
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A little more progress on the power house...


I made the ceiling for the interior. It is detailed with rafters, and will be attached with screws so that I can remove it to access the interior:




I also adding some frame detail to the inside of the front wall. This detail had to be carefully placed so it would line up with the removable interior:




These shots through the side window shows how it all comes together:






Next I started on the corrugated metal exterior. I had previously used real, galvanized, corrugated steel from Rainbow Ridge on my Assay Office building, and considered using it again on this one. But this building has more windows and also many more angles and joins, and the steel is difficult to cut or bend. So I went back to making my own corrugated metal out of .001" thick shim brass sheet. This comes in a 6" wide roll, and I cut into 4" x 6" sheets. I heat the sheets of brass with a plumber's torch to anneal them. Then I place each sheet between two pieces of the corrugated steel, and scribe the groove using a dull pencil:




I start at one end, and scribe a short section at a time until I've gone more the half the length of the piece. Then I turn it around and start scribing the other end, and meet in the middle. Next I flip it over and scribe the other side. When it's done, I trim off that piece (about 1" wide), remove it, place the remaining brass in between the steel, and start over on the next piece. Tedious, but eventually I get it all done. The pieces of corrugated brass are then sprayed with oven cleaner to wash any residue off. After rinsing with water they are set out to dry.

I glue the corrugated metal to the structure using Dynaflex 230 paintable sealant. At this time I have completed covering the exterior walls and have just started on the roof:






There is no need to apply metal to the rear walls, since they will be up against the cliff and not visible. In this photo the rear walls have been removed:




Here are a couple shots showing how it will look on the layout:







That's all for now.



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 Posted: Thu Oct 19th, 2017 09:48 pm
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Ken C
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Ray

Like the finish of the siding after annealing, OK I know it is not right. For the corrugated siding I use a paper corrugated roller (beer cans) may reduce time for siding if you have a lot to make. Got mine from Michaels, tad big for O scale but should work for 1/24 etc.

Ken
GWN



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 Posted: Thu Oct 19th, 2017 10:56 pm
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Rod Hutchinson
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Really nicely done Ray.  I may try your techniques.



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 Posted: Thu Oct 19th, 2017 11:58 pm
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Ray Dunakin
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Thanks!

I've used the paper crimper in the past but the corrugations it makes are a bit large for my tastes. I wish they would make one with smaller corrugations, that would sure be a lot easier than doing them by hand.



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 Posted: Sun Oct 22nd, 2017 05:05 pm
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Si.
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:moose::moose::moose::moose::moose:



Si. :)



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 Posted: Tue Oct 24th, 2017 02:23 am
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Ray Dunakin
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I finally finished creating and installing the corrugated metal. Here's how it looks with all the metal in place:








This overhead shot shows how closely the building fits against the cliff:




Soon I can begin painting it. But first I have to do some work on the doors and windows.

.



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 Posted: Mon Oct 30th, 2017 04:37 am
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Ray Dunakin
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Before I can go any further with the building, I need to create the interior details. These will determine the locations of smokejacks, etc. I'm starting with the largest and most important item, the generator. This will be a "good enough" model -- something that will look good when seen through the windows -- rather than a precise scale model. I'm basing it on this diesel generator I photographed at the Diamond Tunnel mine in Eureka, NV:









I began by building up the "core" shape of the engine, using layers of 6mm and 3mm Sintra:




A piece of 6mm Sintra was added at one end:




I decided that the rectangular openings on the sides were a bit too small, so I cut a little off the top and one end to make the openings larger. The rounded top of the engine was made using a section cut from a 1" styrene tube:




Then the sides were laminated with .020" styrene sheet. The styrene wrinkled slightly in a few places when the glue dried, so I filled in those spots with Squadron white putty and sanded it smooth:





Next I added the arched extension at one end of the top of the engine. I also cut and sanded the top of the engine so that one side has a flat, angled surface, as on the prototype:







The next step is adding the various shapes that protrude from the "core". I began with the piece seen in these two photos:







And that's where it stands for now. More later!

.



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 Posted: Mon Oct 30th, 2017 07:02 pm
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Si.
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Hi Ray :wave:



All I can say ... is ... THAT IS A WHOPPER !! :shocked:



Can't say fairer than THAT ! :P



:thumb:



Si.



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' Mysterious Moose Mountain ' - 1:35n2 - pt.II
http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=7318&forum_id=17&page=1

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http://www.slotforum.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=59295&st=0&a
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