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In-ko-pah Railroad - 1/24th Scale Railcar
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 Posted: Mon Oct 22nd, 2012 04:24 pm
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Sullivan
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The build looks really well done thus far. I look forward to your updates.



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 Posted: Fri Oct 26th, 2012 06:59 pm
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Ray Dunakin
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I just posted a video to YouTube, showing the first test run of the railbus. I wanted to make sure everything worked before getting too far into the build. It runs very smoothly and quietly. Top speed isn't very fast but is acceptable, and it's probably pretty accurate for a heavily-loaded Model T.

http://youtu.be/FX1Yo4twbOU

I'll post some more details of the build soon.



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 Posted: Fri Oct 26th, 2012 07:22 pm
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mwiz64
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Gosh, Ray... I think it looks pretty darn good!

Mike

Last edited on Fri Oct 26th, 2012 10:10 pm by mwiz64



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 Posted: Fri Oct 26th, 2012 08:16 pm
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W C Greene
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I just wish I was 1:24 scale so I could ride in that neat thing around that wonderful layout! Excellent...

Woodie



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 Posted: Sat Oct 27th, 2012 12:01 am
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Sullivan
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That little jewel runs spiffingly well. Just outstanding. Looking forward to the finish work.



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 Posted: Sat Oct 27th, 2012 12:03 am
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Ray Dunakin
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Here's the latest update...

I finished the side panels on the cab, the ones with the curved opening. I had to redo the first one four times before I got it to come out right. Anyway, then I installed the trim and bracing on the inside. The trim around the curved part was cut from sheet styrene. The other parts are from strips:




This is how the body looks so far. I beefed up the windshield frame, finished the side and rear window frames, added interior bracing, and some exterior trim:




The firewall and windshield frame are now thicker and more detailed:




Inside the firewall/floorboard area, I created a slot-like structure which will be used to hold the steering column:




The rear of the body, with the new window frames and trim. I still have to make hinges and handles for the rear door:




The steering column had to be modified due to the fact that the cab must be removable. I used brass tube to replace the kit's steering column, bending it at an angle. The upright portion will be glued into the firewall, leaving only the angled portion visible. You might wonder why a railcar needs a steering wheel at all. It doesn't, however the steering wheels were often kept in place and used as brake wheels.)




I added throttle and spark levers, made from thin brass rod:




Here's a shot of the underside of the body, showing the attachment points. Small screws will go into these points from the underside of the chassis, to hold the body in place. Also, to the left of center you can see where I cut away some of the partion so that the space under the front seat can be used to fit the battery:




This is the chassis deck, with mounts for the r/c receiver. There are two sets of holes in the mounts because I needed to move the receiver forward from where I had originally placed it. I also put up a styrene "fence" around the electronics area to prevent the wires from getting pinched between the body and the chassis. The large opening is for wiring to pass through. The smaller opening is for the on/off switch:




Here's the chassis with the receiver and battery installed:




The on/off switch has no mounting brackets, and was just hot glued into the Losi r/c car. I cut it loose, and hot glued a styrene angle to it so I could screw it onto the chassis:




Here's the on/off switch installed on the deck of the chassis:






Finally, here's an overhead shot of the battery and receiver installed in the vehicle:




At this point I'm kind of stumped. I have to find a way to put in seats and passengers, with the electronics taking up the space where their feet should be. I also need to keep it accessible. And I have to figure out how to attach the roof of the vehicle. I'd like to permanently attach the roof but I'm not sure if that will be possible. It'll depend on how I solve the seating/passenger issue.



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 Posted: Sat Oct 27th, 2012 12:34 am
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Herb Kephart
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Ray-

My railroad has hauled lots of legless passengers, who suffered amputations in the interest of having motors in the cars, which stuck up above the inner floor level. Looking through the windows, it's almost impossible to tell--and I think that they are afraid to complain--after they get to ride for free--

Herb   



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 Posted: Wed Oct 31st, 2012 04:20 am
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Ray Dunakin
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Time for another progress report!

I decided that the passenger seats will be held above the electronics by a simple styrene frame. I can easily glue the seats in place after the interior of the car has been painted. Same with the passengers, who will be cut off just below the knees. Then I'll attach a piece of material painted black or dark brown, to the underside of the seat frames, so as to hide the electronics.




I knocked out the seats pretty quickly. The base is made of styrene strips. The seat back and cushion are made of 1/8" thick sheet styrene, sanded to shape:





The seats were just placed temporarily for these photos. Looking through the window, you really can't see much below the seats. Once the passengers are in place, you'll see even less:




With that settled, I started on the roof, beginning by gluing the ribs in place. The ribs at the end and on the partition were cut from sheet styrene. The other two were made from strips, bent to shape by hand. Each of those ribs is made from two strips. First one is glued in place, then a second strip is glued on over it. Then I sanded away any excess, as needed to match the curves on the solid ribs:






The roof itself is made from styrene, V-grooved siding with approximately .1" spacing. The rear half was easy to apply. The front half has compound curves. At first I thought I could cover it with one piece. I figured I could heat it, then press it over a form. I tried heating a piece of the siding over the stove, but it crinkled. Then I tried heating it in boiling water, but it warped, and I never could get it to go over the form.

So I just applied the siding to the front half of the roof in two sections, and this turned out surprisingly well. I used some of the slightly warped siding that I'd boiled, and this might have helped but I think it would have turned out just as well if I'd used it straight out of the package. Here's how it looks:




I used strips of .040" square styrene to trim the edges of the roof:




I also added some more trim pieces to the sides of the car. And you'll note that I changed my mind about mounting the hood permanently to the chassis, and instead glued it to the body:




Next I made the "cow-catcher". It needs to be strong enough to withstand frequent handling, bumps, and potential derailments, so I constructed it entirely from brass. Soldering is not my favorite subject and my skills in that area are pretty weak, so I wasn't looking forward to soldering such a complex structure. But sometimes you just have to leave your comfort zone! Anyway, I had a pretty good idea of how it should go together, and I didn't have much trouble with it. However, I was so involved with it that I neglected to shoot any progress photos. Here's the finished product:




The one problem was, after I finished it I discovered that I'd made it too short! I had intended to have it fit over the top of the end beam on the front of the chassis frame. You can see where I created an opening in the top, center, for the Model T's starter crank to fit through.

Well, the bottom edge would have been 8 or 9 scale inches above the rails, much too high to be of any use and certainly wouldn't look right. So cut off the top half of the end beam, glued the cow-catcher in place, then glued in another strip of styrene above it. It's not terribly elegant but it'll do:






I also made a few detail parts. I built a handle for the rear door, and the driver's hand lever, both from brass:




And I didn't like the coil box that came with the kit, so I made a new, more accurate one out of styrene. (In this photo it's a little dusty from sanding.)




I won't be installing the interior details until after the thing's been painted. I'm almost to that point now. I still have to make some steps for the rear door, and on both sides of the cab. I also need to make and install the headlights and tail lights. These will be lighted with LEDs.

Here's how the car looks so far:










This morning I took it out to the layout to make sure there were no clearance problems with new cow-catcher. I discovered something else... when I'd run the car on the layout before, I only ran it about halfway, in one direction. I turned it around this time I found that the front wheels derailed going through switches. So I checked them and found that the back-to-back spacing was at least 1/8" too wide!

To reduce that, I had to grind the axle stubs a little shorter, and cut the plastic connecting tube a little shorter also. Then I had to grind and sand off some of the bearing supports on the chassis frame, to keep the back of the wheels from rubbing against it. Finally got it all taken care of and it goes through the switches just fine now.


That's it for now. Enjoy!



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Visit http://www.raydunakin.com to see photos of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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 Posted: Wed Oct 31st, 2012 05:45 pm
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Herb Kephart
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I remember reading somewhere about a car--probably a Lincoln, after Ford bought that company-- the phrase-

"Henry took Lizzie and made a lady out of her"

I think that you have done that also.


Herb 



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 Posted: Wed Oct 31st, 2012 06:40 pm
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Basher
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Ray: Great looking Railcar. Nice work.

Ron D.

 

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