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mwiz64
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I'm somewhat of a newbie railroad modeler. I've toyed with things on an off for several years. I've mostly been a competitive R/C pilot of many disciplines. None of them scale, however. I decided that with the R/C flying getting to the point where I can't really build my own planes and be competitive that I needed a modeling hobby for the off season and modeling narrow gauge is just the thing I want to get into. After fiddling with On30 for the last several months I've decided to switch over to 1:35 scale. Why? Because I want to scratch build stuff and I like the larger size and the obscurity of the scale. Plus, Woodie and his modeling have been a major positive influence on me. So with all that said here is my first 1:35 scale project.







From the photos I think the first 2 might be standard gauge but that last one looks like a narrow gauge version.

I bought a 1/32 scale Model A ford plastic model to get the hood and radiator details. Everything else will be something else I find or I build myself.

The next thing I decided Id buy is the power system. I didn't see anything that immediately stood out as a match. All the HO power trucks have the wheels too far apart. I could settle for something like that because being completely true to scale isn't anything I'm interested in. I just want to capture the essence of this little guy without getting too anal about accuracy. So, I bought an HO 0-4-0 steam loco on Fleabay. I haven't received it yet. My thought is that it will have 2 large spoked wheels that are fairly close together. It might not be suitable but I only paid $9 for it so I figured I'd give it a shot. Here it is.



What do you think, will the little switcher make a decent power system?

Last edited on Mon Nov 5th, 2012 05:35 pm by mwiz64

W C Greene
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It looks great to me You might want to keep the side rods, it would add some "action". That's nice valve gear also but a gas loco don't need no stinkin' valve gear. Here on FR, lilspike is looking for a slope back tender...maybe a swap? That's an old AHM (Rivarossi) loco and they were great runners. The plan comes together.

Woodie

mwiz64
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Keep the side rods. Humm.. Not only will it add some "action", as you put it but it will make more sense since these wheels have counterbalances on them. Good idea! I wish I could find some wheels that looked more like the original since I think they are a big part of the character of this little guy but keeping the side rods is probably a good second place idea.

Thanks!

Mike

Last edited on Mon Nov 5th, 2012 05:49 pm by mwiz64

Ray Dunakin
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Cool project. I'd like to build one of those myself someday. Finding suitable wheels is always a challenge, even more so in 1/24th.

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HIYA....

I think I'm going to be a copycat...

Hope the teacher doesn't find out...

Smokebox

Dallas_M
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Cool project!

Dan B
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What year did they start making those things?
-Dan

W C Greene
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What things? The Brookville or the AHM 0-4-0?

Woodie

tebee
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W C Greene wrote:
What things? The Brookville or the AHM 0-4-0?



They are both fairly ancient :old dude:

Dan B
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I was curious about the Brookvilles. What a neat looking little unit. I have never seen one of those before. Should be a fun build.

mwiz64
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I was gonna mothball this project while I built the Tin Turtle but I've decided to go ahead with it anyway. If nothing else building it will be good experience.

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Hey Dan B ! I noticed you have 'Copperhead' as your icon. I try to visit 'Copperhead once a year. It is really tempting to rebuild an Bachmann 0-4-2t Porter as an On30 version of the little guy. Maybe I will save that idea for an SM32 project, would be truer to form.

-Wayde

mwiz64
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Well, my 1/32 Model A finally arrived. The project can now officially start. Ill be posting some photos and asking questions soon.

mwiz64
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Alright, I dissassembled the little AHM 0-4-0 this evening. I'm not so sure it's going to be suitable. I think I may have to settle with a Bachmann Davenport as a donor. My only problem that is the wheels are too small and too far apart. I just think the wheels are such a big part of what makes this little loco so cool.

Last edited on Fri Dec 7th, 2012 04:40 pm by mwiz64

Dallas_M
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Hmm ... your initial reference photo shows a STANDARD GUAGE Brookville ...



Here's a TWO-FOOT gauge Brookville ... which is "probably" closer to what you're after modeling 1/35 scale on HO gauge track ... and it might simplify some of your concerns about fitting a mechanism ... ???

Added bonus:  funky doo-dad details stickin' out da hood ... and a pilot that could double as a battering ram! :)

Last edited on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 03:33 am by Dallas_M

mwiz64
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Hum.... I likey. Thanks.

Mike

Dallas_M
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If you search for Brookville loco images, you'll find all sorts of variations ... seems like they didn't bother too much with "blueprints" ... they just said, "yeah, got it ... build a little loco ... comin' right up!"

Also, the 2' gauge above looks like it might have been built from a tractor ... all sorts of weird stuff ... frame lengths, drive units & cab styles vary, etc ... if you look at a a bunch of Brookville photos you'll probably be able to mix-n-match features to work with parts you have on hand ... that seems to be how THEY built them! :)

Last edited on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 05:20 am by Dallas_M

Herb Kephart
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And all the early Brookville locos seemed to be based on car or tractor motive power -- Ford predominately


Herb 

mwiz64
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It seems that I could use the model A ford hood I have and a Bachmann Davenport and some styrene and make up a reasonably decent Brookvillish looking loco and that's what I'm going to have to settle for this time around. That will be OK.... This time.;)

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Want to find some interesting infernal combustion critters, google 'canesig' or 'feldbahn', lots of interesting stuff.

-Wayde

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This may be closer gauge wise to what you have in mind
Model A based, either 24" or 30", not sure...



My avitar photo is also a Brookville......
Ken

W C Greene
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Now that is what I call a "critter"...it makes me want to build one also.

Woodie

mwiz64
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Well, here is the Brookville-ish project. It certainly isn't a raving beauty but I think it's coming along fairly well for my skill level. If there is one thing I'd change, I'd like it to be sitting on a bigger set of wheels. As it is, it's 1:35 scale and it's sitting on a Bachmann On30 frame.

It obviously needs some clean up work and it needs to be painted. Those crazy military figures are kind of a pain. I never imagined that guy was assembled from 14 different pieces that didn't really fit together very well. I bought some Squadron green putty to fill the seams with. Then I'll try my hand at painting a figure. I'm imagining that part won't turn out as well as Id like.

Anyway, I'm not thin skinned at all. Please hit me with any constructive criticism you may have.







mwiz64
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Oh and Dallas, if you're looking at those photos above. Look really hard at that roof. I think you might recognize it.

mwiz64
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As I'm looking at the photos I'm noticing things I don't notice as much just looking at the model itself. I think photos have a way of putting things in a better perspective.

Here are my proposed changes. Let me know what you think. My posts for holding up the roof look too big in diameter. I'd like them to be half that size maybe. My roof is a little too low too. I'm thinking I might bump up another scale half foot or so. I can't tell from the full scale photos if a man could actually stand upright inside that cab.

What do you guys think?

Last edited on Fri Jan 4th, 2013 06:10 am by mwiz64

W C Greene
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Howdy Mike, I agree that the roof needs a little more height. While I love "skull cracker" roofs, this one may be a bit too low. And yes, the supports need to be a shade thinner. Here I might suggest using some brass "rod", say .060 or .100 or so for the supports. Styrene would be a bit too flimsy for this. Otherwise, she's a great looking model and will be a fine 1:35 critter. You might get a standing dude to see how much height you would like, he may not have to actually stand up inside the cab but be able to get in without crawling on the cab floor! Excellent work.

Woodie

mwiz64
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Thanks, Woodie.

I'm not too sure I like my roof overhanging that much on the sides either. Maybe I'll just cut the cab off and start over completely on that part. One of the nice things about where I work. It's a 2 minute drive to the LHS. I can just pop in on lunch and get what I need.

W C Greene
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OK, how about this-get a sheet of .020 or so brass sheet and make a simple curved roof then solder the supports to that. You might drill appropriate size holes in the roof where the supports would be and once soldered together, the roof would be sturdy and have "details" on the top. Get enough materials to do the job and make one...if that don't cut it then make another (experience) and choose the best one. Save the other for another loco or as "junque" behind the engine house.

Woodie

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Once again, the answer will be "it depends" or "whatever."   On this loco, obviously there's no standing room in the cab ... in fact, that's quite typical of many small locos where the cab roof may be around 6' from the ground.  It DOES take some acrobatics to get into these things ... not only that, but many had exposed chain drive components without safety shields, etc.  Remember the idea of "expendable crew member" ??



Here's a little loco (not Brookville) that does have standing height in the cab ... I think that the flavor of your bash will best be served by keeping a fairly low cab.

SUGGESTION:  Try raising your cab roof just a LITTLE ... maybe 3 to 6" scale.  Suspect the latter would do the trick.

LOOK, LOOK, LOOK:  At both of the photos above and others preceding in this thread ... the frame has a good bit of HEFT to it ...



Here's some quick imagineering to show how I'd modify what you've got to suit MY tastes ... your mileage may vary!

This photo shows a couple of slices -- add about 4" scale height to cab ... AND add some heft to the deck/frame.  For the latter, I'd probably increase the frame height about .125" actual.

For construction, I'd use either:
a)  .100 x .100 strip around the edge of the existing deck (on top) and then add a new deck from .020" styrene with cut-outs for the motor, etc.  The cut-out for the transmission hump will be smaller than what you measure at the base, because it's rounded and decreases in diameter toward the top.  (Sounds complicated -- it gets skinnier as you go up -- make a paper cut-out first to try it)
b)  .080 x .080 strip with .040" styrene deck.  Either way adds up the same.  The .020" styrene in version A is easier to cut!
c)  Either way, add some matching strip  alongside the motor, etc to brace the new top deck so it doesn't sag near the cut-outs.



So, here's the frame with the heightened deck.  Then make some side skirts from .015" or .020" styrene sheet ... journal covers from .010" styrene strip or sheet ... hinges from .060" half round strip with some .010x.060 strip underneath to make them match up to the journals ... and a few rivets from Tichy or Grandt.

You'll notice that this resembles the first loco in this post a bit! :)



Same thing, but I filled in the gaps where the cab was spiced and put the little dude back together ... and skinnied up the corner posts a bit ... I do think the roof should be narrowed to match the loco (just a little overhang each side and yes I do recognize the part!)



You could do a cab like this if you were feeling adventurous ... but it's NOT necessary.  The Brookvilles generally had the rear-entry cab as you've shown ... I just did this to show how the frame mods take on the flavor and overall proportions of that inspiration loco.

So, there's my 10¢ worth ... I think you're heading in a good direction ... take anything or nothing from what I've shown here!  If it's useful, great ... if not, only 10¢ lost! :cool:

mwiz64
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@ Woodie,

Make the whole thing outa brass... Hum. Maybe. I just left the LHS. I'm going to give my current plan a try first. If that doesn't meet my expectation, ill give your idea a try.

Last edited on Fri Jan 4th, 2013 06:12 am by mwiz64

Dallas_M
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Bump ... cuz we were posting at the same time and you may have missed all that crap that I thoughtfully crapped out! :old dude:

(See "29th post" on previous page!)

Last edited on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 06:55 pm by Dallas_M

mwiz64
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Thanks for that,Dallas. Those are some good ideas. Ill likely incorporate some of that in the cab rebuild I do tonight. Stay tuned for the modifications....:)

Last edited on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 06:59 pm by mwiz64

Dallas_M
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Okie-doke ... IMO, beefing up the frame a bit would go a long way toward improving the overall proportions.  On the downside, side skirts conceal the "neato" side cranks ... on the upside, they downplay the small wheels and help scale it up to a smallish 1/35 critter.  Look forward to seeing what you do. :thumb:

Further thought:  Do get "caught up" enough in it to make it look "good" to YOUR eye ... DON'T get fall into the trap of trying to make the first one perfect!  That'll just drive you :Crazy:

Last edited on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 07:03 pm by Dallas_M

mwiz64
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I like the frame enhancement idea too. In fact, I'm thinking of making an entire shell that just slips over actual frame. That way, I can glue everything down to the floor and still have access to the mechanics.

I'm not too worried about it being perfect. Some of those full scale ones above didn't look particularly perfect. That's part of the attraction for me to this type of modeling. I can screw up while I'm learning and still have a finished model that looks reasonably close to something that could have existed in full scale.

FWIW, even though it's not much of a project, I'm enjoying it... a lot.

W C Greene
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Well OK...but I love the siderods! You know, the small wheels can be replaced with larger ones. I thought about that for my #6 but left things like they were. Be sure that you include an outrageous muffler/exhaust.

Woodie

mwiz64
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Alright, I think I've incorporated some good ideas from you guys and aside from some cleanup and maybe a little detailing... and of course painting and weathering, it's done. I think it's vastly improved guys. Thanks for the help!




Last edited on Fri Jan 4th, 2013 04:02 am by mwiz64

mwiz64
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Maybe that exhaust is too big... Ah heck. I'm leavin' it the way it is. Now, I need to go back and revisit my Shed project. I need to build it in 1:35 scale instead of 1:48. I might build a flat car with something on it. Maybe make it a little tank car... Hummmm

The idea here is to have this all come together on a small diorama. Picture it sitting on the tracks next to this shed and that pile of dirt.



Last edited on Fri Jan 4th, 2013 04:01 am by mwiz64

mwiz64
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Well, after that last post I decided to put together a little tank car outa some junk that I've acquired since I started thinking that model railroading is something I wanted to give a try. It's still a little crude but I think before it's all done it will look pretty good.


Last edited on Fri Jan 4th, 2013 05:59 am by mwiz64

mwiz64
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I think the story is starting to develop too. The shed has a heater in it. It's actually a small office out at a quarry and the little critter is delivering some heating oil. I'll need to get a hose and a hand pump.

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I thought i recognised that shed! OR & W? Great looking Brookville, reminds me of a Plymouth critter!

Last edited on Fri Jan 4th, 2013 08:43 am by OhioMike

mwiz64
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OhioMike wrote: I thought i recognised that shed! OR & W? Great looking Brookville, reminds me of a Plymouth critter!
I really don't know what railroad it's from. As I recall, I was just surfing old railroad pictures and just liked this one. I reckoned it was simple enough for a first scratch build but detailed enough to give me some experience doing a few things beyond what I might encounter building an outhouse.

I like Plymouth critters quite a lot. They are very rugged looking to me so it would make sense that this one appealed to me too and that you saw the similar aesthetics. Of course, it didn't look too cool at first but I'm pretty happy with it now.

As I look at the flat car I did last night, it needs some bigger beams around the ends and sides. It's little too wispy looking like it is now.

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My comment (only 5 cents--what a bargain!) on all of the above, is that there is more than one way to skin a cat (sorry for the analogy, Jake).

I think that I would leave the side skirts off the deck, however. I like to watch the siderods flailing around. Siderods are like certain female appendages--if you have 'em, show 'em.


Herb 

mwiz64
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Well, I'd planed on detailing them a little. Maybe I should take them off and take some photos of it like that to see what it looks like. I find I get a better perspective of the model from the photo. Is there any precedence in full scale for opening up the skirts only in front of the wheels and rods themselves?

Last edited on Fri Jan 4th, 2013 04:22 pm by mwiz64

mwiz64
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I could do something like this to the side skirts.

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Yes, that's it! Then you got both...side frames and side rods. Nice...

Woodie

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Congratulations! You've turned "newbie to scratchbuilding" into a nearly-completed project (and then some) ... the curved end beams on the loco are a nice touch ... keep going! :thumb:

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Thanks guys. This is a pretty cool little project for me. It's got to be as close to instant gratification as any scratch build could be. Ill open up the side skirts over the wheels. I have to get some NBW castings. I wanna add some junk to the deck too. While I wait for some of that stuff to arrive, ill start on the building. Then, scenery... That's going to be a completely new experience for me. I've built models before... Not scratch built but I've fabricated parts on my planes so this was easy. Scenery.... Suffice it to say ill be asking questions.

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mwiz64 wrote: I could do something like this to the side skirts.That would work, do it, it has a nice "layers" visual effect.

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OK, I cut in the side access ports. They look good, BTW. I've filled the seams and stuff. I've finish sanded it. I've ordered some NWB castings. As soon as the NWB's are installed, just a few of them, I need to paint. The thing is, I've never painted a little model like that where I was even slightly happy with the result. That's likely because I used paint like Rustolium.

So now at the LHS I see railroad paints in these little bottles. I'm assuming I'll have to use the airbrush to use these colors. I'm sure hand painting wont turn out very well. Is true? Will a single action airbrush be OK for painting things like this? I have some old HO box cars that I can practice on.

Also, I want to paint this little guy black and I of course want it to look pretty beat up with some rusty patches. I so, would you prime this with a rust color and then paint the black and chip it off? I also bought myself an assortment of Bragdon weathering powders. Would I be better off dusting on the rusty looking spots over the black paint?

I know, that's a lot of it depends questions but I thought I'd ask them and see what kinds of advice I get back.

Thanks in advance!

W C Greene
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A single action airbrush is fine for this. There are some great spray can paints available also, my favorite is Tamiya. They have several blacks, scale black is nice. If you airbrush, then practice some on the old boxcars. Weathering is where you will get 38 "how to's" from 32 different guys. I would use the Bragdon chalks since it can be washed off if you ain't satisfied and try again. There are some techniques like using rust color as a base and then putting salt on the areas you want rusty and spraying the color, you come back and scrub off the salt and you have rust spots. This is shown here on FR but I don't remember where. Take it easy on this, we have seen one example of bad weathering that made a critter look like a Holstein cow! Take your time and experimant on the old boxcars, you'l be glad you did.

Woodie

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mwiz64 wrote: I'm assuming I'll have to use the airbrush to use these colors. No, not have to.

An airbrush is the fastest way to get a smooth overall coat of paint.
for painting an overall body color it often takes longer to clean the airbrush than the painting did.
And with skill, luck, and a few arcane incantations, airbrush can be used for fine weathering effects. Easiest is doing an overall coating of dust. Next simplest is fading colors as you paint - start at bottom then add a little more white (or similar) as you move up.

With the right paint/thinner mix and airbrush nozzle setting the paint will be nearly dry as it hits the model. But just as with spray cans, hosing one spot too long will get you runs, drips, and errors.

mwiz64
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I think I want to play with the airbrush on the old box cars. I bought that darn thing years ago and have never really used it. It's a single action Badger and I have a nice little compressor with it too assuming it still works. If not,maybe ill just get a can of compressed air. There isn't much rattle can paint that would be suitable at the LHS. I'm going to play with the salt method too.

Last edited on Tue Jan 8th, 2013 05:47 pm by mwiz64

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I use CO2 bottle, gave away my Paasche compressor...I love the bottle-silent, easy to use, and has more CFM than the compressors so you get better spray. I have a regulator, PSI gauge, and manifold for 2 brushes, can go from 5 PSI to enough to blow holes in styrene. If you get canned air, put the can in a pan of room temp. water about half way up the can...let it sit a bit and then use, the air will last a lot longer.

Woodie-been doing custom work for over 40 years and do know something about airbrushing...

mwiz64
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So do you just go to someplace like a paintball gun supply store and get your Co2 bottle refilled?

Last edited on Sun Jan 6th, 2013 04:23 am by mwiz64

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Nope, I go to a welder's supply for that. I have a 24" tall CO2 tank which must be tested each time it is refilled. It cost about $40 and the fill is about $15. A tank may last about 100 or so paint jobs. Now, I imagine that you could use little paintball tanks. You do need the regulator to use a 3/8" NPT fitting (standard) which also fits Paasche (etc) braided air hoses. Badger's hose uses the same fitting. Take the air hose with you when you check these things out. Also, I don't need a moisture trap with the CO2, you do need one with a compressor. Have fun.
Woodie

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Oh, I like the idea of quiet!

mwiz64
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Well, I couldn't wait to get the NBW castings on it. I might add them later. I also couldn't wait to fiddle with the airbrush. So I moved ahead without those two things.

This little guy was hand painted with a very thin blackish color paint. The figure painter guys call it Nulin Oil. I then hit it with the Bragdon powders. I still need to tweak the weathering a little. Particularly on the side rods and wheel counter balances. I want to add a little junk to the deck. Not a lot. Just a few details like some chain and maybe a gas can... Not sure just yet.

I think it turned out pretty good for a first scratch built train model. I've put together some plastic kits before but I've never painted them much less weathered anything before. No, not even my planes were weathered. I kept them bright and shiny and mostly covered with iron on plastic film. All in all, I'm pretty satisfied with this little critter. I don't really think I can call it a Brookville anymore. It's not really a model of anything they exactly made.

I think I'm hooked on 1:35 scale. I can't imagine going any smaller and I love the fact that my stuff is a bit unusual in that regard. Now this little guy needs the rest of a 1:35 scale world to live in... or at least a few hundred "1:35 scale" square feet. That's next.












Last edited on Tue Jan 8th, 2013 03:30 pm by mwiz64

Ray Dunakin
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Nice!

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Thanks, Ray. I was rather surprised with it. I know it's no show stopper but it's a lot better than I thought I was capable of. Of course, it's really not a scratch build. It's more of a kitbash. The Model A hood came from a Lindberg car model. The roof, horn and exhaust came from a Boulder Valley Models kit. Obviously, the frame and mechanics came from Bachmann Davenport. All I did was cut a little styrene and brass to make the cab. Oh, I made the rounded end beams by cutting a curved piece of balsa on my scroll saw and then I faced it with sheet styrene.

I see I still have a flaw on my engineer figure. I missed filling a seam on his side right under his arm. Oh well. I can live with it the way it is.

Also, I'm not sure about getting it working as an RC model and that was one of my original goals. I don't have anyplace for a battery, unless maybe I permanently attach it to a car that houses the battery.

Herb Kephart
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Mike, for a first try at airbrushing, you did right well!

I would suggest a little spritz of oily black on the ends of the connecting rods---grease leakage, you know--

Other than that--VERY well done!


Herb 

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Herb,

I didn't airbrush it. I hand painted it and weathered it with Bragdon powders. I do want to get the rods and such, more weathered. Thanks for the idea. They are just too shiny like they are. That said, I don't want to over do them and make them hard to see.

Last edited on Mon Jan 7th, 2013 05:35 pm by mwiz64

W C Greene
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Yes, she is a winner! Now, I like a yeller loco but the color is just fine. Battery you say? Check the r/c store, LOSI and some others make 200MAH jobs that would fit inside the cab. You just need to consider "creative cramming" here. Take her down to the store and see what will fit...I know you ain't a stranger at r/c stores!

Woodie

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200s eh.... I've not played with any batteries that small before. Ill check Hobby King to see what they have. My LHS won't have anything like that but HK puts their battery dimensions on their website AND they are a dirt cheap source for lipo batteries.

The color isn't exactly what I'd originally had in mind but as I applied it I thought it looked a lot like some heavily oxidized paint so I went with it.

I'm pretty happy with it like it is with the aforementioned revisions to the rods.

Thanks, Woodie. Your modeling has been my inspiration. Yeah, lots of others guys here too but you in particular are the guy I think of when I think of Freerails and my modeling and where I want to be with my modeling some day. I won't ever copy you. I just like the level of detail you do and the look you end up with. No it ain't yeller but its a well worn look and that I did want.

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Mike-groovy! You got it.

Woodie

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At this point the superstructure isn't attached to the frame. One thought is to just install some locator pins at the four corners and then drill some holes in the frame floor for the pins to slide into. Now this will keep the superstructure from sliding around but it won't allow me to pick it up by the roof.

I'm also considering installing some rare earth magnets. You glue one to the frame floor and another magnet oppsite that one on the part you want to hold down. If I place 4 tiny ones at each corner ill have a pretty secure fit. I'm just not sure I want to hassle with the magnets.... Any thoughts?

Last edited on Mon Jan 7th, 2013 06:41 pm by mwiz64

W C Greene
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Mike-a lot of my locos have superstructures glued on with Elmer's glue. It holds things together but is easy to get apart when needed. Think about that.

Woodie

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That certainly doesn't look like a newbie scratchbuild! Well done.

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Well, that's because I had guys like you giving me good advice along the way. I'm not new to modeling. I've been building R/C planes all my life. I just never built anything like this before. And... I deliberately chose a simple project. I learned long ago that starting simple makes for an encouraging first experience. Now I'm already looking at how I can modify a Bachmann on30 2-6-0 into a 1:35 scale Baldwin 2-6-2T like those used in WWI.

That project comes after the full diorama I intended to build for this critter but the thought process has already started. By the time I actually convert that loco ill have worked out a lot of the issues of the conversion in my mind.

Thanks for the compliment, BTW....

Last edited on Tue Jan 8th, 2013 04:37 am by mwiz64

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Brookville is super cool! Instantly made me want to add to my unfinished projects. :) (Until the voices in my head reminded me of the unfinished projects!) :old dude:

Curious how the On30 Mogul sizes out against the 2-6-2T's in 1/35 scale. How's the overall size compare? What about driver size and spacing?

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The Bachmann 2-6-0 isn't ideal in 1/35 but it's not too bad. I laid the model over the 3/8 scale drawing in Narrow Gauge To No Man's Land and the overall size is pretty good. The driver spacing isn't bad. The wheels are a little big. The side rods/valve gear on the Bachmann are a lot simpler. Nobody makes anything where their is such a large space between the boiler and the frame as the 2-6-2T had but... With the right cab, domes and side tanks... and other little details, I think it could be a pretty reasonable "squint your eyes" representation. In fact, the Vulcan version with it's more squared off look might be easier "for me" to build than the Baldwin. I'm still hashing that one out. I like the looks of the Baldwin version better. I'm sure when it's all done, I will want for a more accurate model but this conversion is within my skill level... or at least I think it is right now. I may regret that statement down the road.

Last edited on Tue Jan 8th, 2013 06:03 pm by mwiz64

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Mike-here's something different. Although it is a bit smaller-smaler drivers, driver spacing-I just placed a Mantua (Tyco) 2-6-2 on top of a 3/8" (1:32) drawing for a Baldwin 2-6-2t in Narrow Gauge to No Man's Land and it appears that a smaller version of such a loco could be built from this. My 2-6-2 has nice valve gear and with some work might build into a creditable model, even with the smallish frame, etc. I have no plans to build this loco, I was just "thinking" and offered this idea. Yep, it would require some work (everything except the mechanism) but might just do the job.

Woodie

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I should probably get myself one of those, Woodie... for a future project. That conversion is probably more than I should take on at this stage of the game.

Last edited on Tue Jan 8th, 2013 03:18 pm by mwiz64

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Alright...I'm  back looking at the prototype photos of the Brookville. I think I made my exhaust come up through the fuel tank. That's a boo boo and a half. Oh well, I'll pretend that only one side of that is fuel tank and the other half is a shroud.

Last edited on Tue Jan 15th, 2013 02:37 pm by mwiz64

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Oops.

Hey, an album of assorted Brookvilles, http://www.northeast.railfan.net/diesel108.html

And as a point of trivia, Brookville is still around http://www.brookvillecorp.com/history.asp

Last edited on Tue Jan 15th, 2013 10:25 pm by Kitbash0n30

mwiz64
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Yep and Yep. I actually knew the exhaust wasn't stock. It was added because well because I wanted one and this isn't really a scale model of any particular Brookville and I thought it looked cool. I still think it looks cool. It might have been a little more cool if I had placed it differently but such as it is, it's staying that way now.

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Well, there's that old thing of there's a prototype for everything :)

Herb Kephart
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Mike-

I thought that it was one of the rare Brookvilles that ran on kerosene, which requires heating to run in a gas engine.

Bubble, bubble, toil and----KA_BOOM!


Herb 

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Sigh... That's where older guys have me. They know this stuff because they used it when they were young. My oldest car was a 1973 Monte Carlo. There was no fuel tank anywhere near the firewall on that car or any I've had since. Oh well.... Live and learn says I.

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Nice build Mike !

Cheers

Si.

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Thanks, Si.

I haven't had much time to play with trains lately or I'd have some more detail on it. Soon.....

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Hi Mike :wave:



I always liked your 1:35 Brookville project very much ! :thumb:


I have been collecting some Brookville proto-photos for a while now. :old dude:

Just had a look through them recently ...

... & couldn't resist Posting these 2 !








Too  C :cool: :cool: L  for school ! :)



Indian mountain railways are OK ...

... but I can't help wondering if you've already got the basis of a neat lil' railroad, right here ! L:














What a GREAT lil' locie ! :)



Dunno about gloomy WWI trench-railways myself ... :f:

... but that Brooky would fit right into any small industrial theme, of many different eras !!



Just need a small handful of stock ...

... & maybe a SNOWPLOW ! ;)



Nice ! :pimp:



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:



Si.

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Thanks Si.

Funny enough, I pulled it out and looked at it just the other day. It needs some more details on that base. Right now, building a railroad isn't a good idea. I think I'm going to be moving again soon but I could do some more work on it and maybe build a few cars. Hum...

Last edited on Thu Feb 8th, 2018 07:50 pm by mwiz64

W C Greene
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Howdy Mike...GET TO WORK! You could build a small mini layout and have a ball watching her s%^t & git! Beautiful little thing.

Woodie

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" I could do some more work on it and maybe build a few cars. Hum... "



Hi Mike :wave:



Great minds think alike ! :old dude:



The difference between building a layout & building a few cars + detailing ... is MASSIVE !

Layouts may well be nice ...

... but they are also commitments that time, space, money, moving etc. sometimes just won't allow at present.



Personally I don't think ones 'modelmaking spirit' should be dampened by such things.

Car building is FUN, time needed is minimal, so's the space & so's the dough.



I potter along at present, with not that much thought about the bigger picture ...

... but the Mysterious Moose Mountain carshop manages to knock out a new car every month or so.

No pressure whatsoever. :moose:

When I've made my rolling-stock ... THEN it's time to think about the BIG stuff !



Go on Mike, sniff some MEK ...

... and glue 'super-details' to your thumbnails ...

... you know you want to !



;)



Si.

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I’ve got a couple competition planes to finish up before the season begins this spring. Once I have those done, I’ll get back on this project.

Thanks for the kick in the butt, Si.... and Woodie.


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