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An editor's note
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 Posted: Sat Jun 1st, 2013 01:01 am
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sledhead
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Herb Kephart wrote:
No loss to me--I don't waste money on most hobby mags. anymore.

Herb

Yeah, me neither. I dropped all my hobby mag subscriptions and instead picked up a few memberships in the Historical Societies of railroads I'm interested in. They publish nice quarterlies with great prototype inspiration and information, plus some of the cash goes to a worthy cause. Win-win.



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 Posted: Sat Jun 1st, 2013 03:50 am
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jtrain
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Mike,

That is a great idea, and something I hadn't thought of. Are quarterlies printed for railroads that nor longer operate? Or is it just our modern survivors that outlasted all the others?

--James:java:



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 Posted: Sat Jun 1st, 2013 05:13 am
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sledhead
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jtrain wrote: Mike,

That is a great idea, and something I hadn't thought of. Are quarterlies printed for railroads that nor longer operate? Or is it just our modern survivors that outlasted all the others?

--James:java:

James,

Actually, the fallen flag historical societies probably outnumber existing lines by at least 10:1. Some are more active than others, like all things of course. I contribute to the Soo Line Historical and Technical Society, and the Chicago and Northwestern Historical Society. The C&NWHS is quite simply one of the best railroad historical organizations you'll find anywhere. Every quarterly is a can't miss for CNW fans, and they also publish CNW Modeler, quarterly as well, available online free. If you have an interest in a specific railroad, and want to learn more about it as well as help preserve some of its history, I  recommend joining. It gives those of us who are unable to actively participate in historical preservation and documentation a way to contribute in a small bit.

Here are some links to a few:

Milwaukee Road Historical Association
Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Railroad
Burlington Route Historical Society
Great Northern Railway Historical Society
Green Bay & Western Historical Society
Rock Island Technical Society

I checked out your blog, and I have to say I really appreciated your slightly philosophical take on model railroading. Model Railroaders tend to be technocrats, after all, we ARE talking machines here. But there is a human side to both railroading and model railroading that sometimes gets overlooked.  I'm also an engineering student, and I have to say finding time to model is a challenge, especially when one's interests tend to wander, a guy like me ends up with dozens of orphaned projects.



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 Posted: Sat Jun 1st, 2013 06:05 am
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jtrain
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Mike,

When the words 'Soo Line' flash across the screen, you start talking right up my alley. I guess I already knew Soo Line and CNW historical societies existed, but it's good to know that there are a quite a number of such organizations who dedicate time to preserving the past.

I'm also thankful for your kind words regarding my site. I adopted my 'philosophy' from my local railroad museum. There, the idea is 'People, Places, and Trains.' Every railroad is associated with the people it serves. So for me that's what the locomotives symbolize and what our works of art stand for. When we model, we capture the character of the railroad and the people who built it and are served by it every day.

So I guess that is part of the reason I got so disgusted with that editor. Whether you model a fictitious line or you model he prototype right down to the inch, if you've captured that feeling where you are in that place and time, then you've truly modeled the real world.

Anyways, always great to hear kind words, especially regarding my blog, hope you find it interesting enough to come back later.

--James:java:

Last edited on Sat Jun 1st, 2013 06:16 am by jtrain



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 Posted: Wed Jun 5th, 2013 08:37 am
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sledhead
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One important point that hasn't been addressed yet here. There are two extremes in the realm of railroad modeling. You have at one extreme the Railroad Model Builders (such as those that build the exquisite models represented by Westlake) and at the other extreme you have the Model Railroaders (the guys who are devoted to mimicking the operation of a real railroad, not the bolt pattern on the bottom of an industrial switcher). Obviously, you have some spectrum sharing in the middle, where I feel most of us lie. Though I would wager most fall more on the Model Railroader side than Model Builders. To model a respectable segment of actual railroad requires forgoing the minute attention to detail advocated by the finescale model builder, especially since most of us have precious few modeling hours in each day. There are only so many details on can address when a man has a finite amount of time to play with.



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 Posted: Wed Jun 5th, 2013 01:07 pm
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Herb Kephart
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"There are only so many details on can address when a man has a finite amount of time to play with."

Amen.

AMEN!


Herb



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 Posted: Wed Jun 5th, 2013 01:54 pm
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Kitbash0n30
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jtrain wrote: Try this link:

http://jjwtrains.blogspot.com/2013/05/something-to-think-about.html
From that
... it is apparent to me that there exists a cultural fracture in this hobby between those that don't about the ultimate detail, and those that make 100% accuracy their main goal. Yep. Been that way since at least the 1970s.



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 Posted: Wed Jun 5th, 2013 04:36 pm
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W C Greene
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Whatta hornets' nest we got going here! Many years ago, me and a buddy were looking at an NMRA contest model, a D&RG On3 caboose. The builder showed us how the outside hung brakes worked when the wheel was turned and it even had packing and grease in the journal boxes. Nothing but details. The guy said that he spent a year on JUST THAT ONE CAR and nothing else. By now, that fellow probably has 30 incredible On3 cars...but NO LAYOUT to run them on. But he has 30 incredible cars...
To paraphrase the old lady in the TV ad..."Whar's the fun?"

Thank you and good day.
Woodrow



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 Posted: Thu Jun 6th, 2013 03:00 am
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mwiz64
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That guy with those 30 cars is probably saying the same thing about people with big layouts that don't include those important details. I just wish people could enjoy the aspects of the hobby they like best without disrespecting what others are doing.

Just so you know, we have the same thing in RC aviation. One group just can't see why the other guys don't do thing the way they do and when I say one group I mean people in just about any group. I guess it's just human nature.... For some but not everyone.

I'm one of those guys that likes every damned thing. I have to work hard to focus my efforts on one thing long enough to get good at it. Fortunately for me, I have a wife that keeps me in line.



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 Posted: Thu Jun 6th, 2013 05:12 am
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jtrain
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I'm with Mwiz here on this one. I can accept how others do work, and appreciate it. And I can see my shortcomings plain as day; that doesn't mean I need the news served to me with a side of snobbery. I can get the same effect by paying someone to hit me across the face.


As for woodie's story, it's a classic example of "whatever floats your boat." Although I'd love to have cars that detailed, I think my fun boat would sink when the trucks catch on fire because I hadn't greased the journal boxes in a month.
;)

--James:java:



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