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smokebox
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HIYA EVERYONE....

Does anyone have anyidea how big steeplecabs got while still rolling on archbar trucks?

I mean, are we talking about 15 ton locos??? Or big critter sized??
Surely the 40 ton were to heavy for them?

Rob Wright
smokebox

Last edited on Fri Jun 28th, 2013 11:09 pm by

Kitbash0n30
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Hang on, have some books to look in. Will be back.

Kitbash0n30
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So far have found 2 steeplecabs with archbar trucks.

> Whitin Machine Works #3, built by Taunton works. No weight given but has all wood body, so likely was fairly light.
Reference: Not Only Passengers, CERA Bulletin 129

> Claremont Ry #18 built 1907 by GE. weight 32 tons. free speed 20mph. motors 4x GE-57 of 50hp each.
Reference: A Rainbow of Traction, CERA Bulletin 126

CERA = http://www.cera-chicago.org/
"The Central Electric Railfans' Association is one of the nation's premier railfan organizations, hosting regular programs and events about electric railroading (both past and present). CERA also publishes books like none other about the history and operations of our great rail history. Help support CERA by becoming a member today!

Probably the best way to keep informed of CERA's upcoming programs and activities is through our new CERA Members Blog on Wordpress. Become a "follower" of our blog, and get automatic e-mail notifications about upcoming programs, special events, fantrips, new publications, and historical information. Take part in the discussions by commenting or submitting blog posts yourself.

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Kitbash0n30
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Another steeplecab with archbar trucks, Claremont Railway and Lighting Company unit "B".
How this relates to #28 mentioned above is unknown; couldl potentially be same loco.
Spoked wheels even. No data given, all metal construction. Going by ballparking height of cab door at 6ft the loco was probably between 16 and 20 feet long - fairly light.
Reference: Kalmbach's Traction Guidebook for Model Railroaders.

Kitbash0n30
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claremont #18 also photo in Carstens' Traction Planbook, no data given, but tht's okay since CERA data above. Mentions that the steeplecab configuration came in sizes from timy 4 wheel jobs to 85 tonners. Expect we can safely conclude the 85 tonners did not have arch bar trucks.

Across the Bridge
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smokebox wrote:
Does anyone have anyidea how big steeplecabs got while still rolling on archbar trucks?

AFAIK, no electric locos ever rode on "archbar" trucks :!:

The earlier and lighter weight electric locos generally rode on trucks which were modifications of steam locomotive tender truck designs, as these were pre-existing designs which were intended to carry significant weights (of water).

As electric loco gross ton weights increased, along with sales, purpose designed locomotive trucks came into play. Some locos, especially "home made" ones, rode on what were basically electric passenger car trucks (including in some cases early swing-bolster types). Piedmont and Northern, Illinois Terminal and Oregon Electric (later CNS&M and FDDM&S) all had large, heavy B+B+B+B electric locos that rode on trucks recycled from passenger cars.


Will

Last edited on Sat Jun 29th, 2013 05:23 am by Across the Bridge

Kitbash0n30
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They have trucks which certainly are constructed in the arch bar style

http://www.trainweb.org/chris/photos/12troy6.JPG

http://members.bellatlantic.net/~vze3p8dp/

http://www.thetransportco.com/imagelib/sitebuilder/misc/show_image.html?linkedwidth=actual&linkpath=http://www.thetransportco.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/tm0002.jpg&target=tlx_new

Across the Bridge
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Kitbash0n30 wrote:
They have trucks which certainly are constructed in the arch bar style

There are many different types of trucks, and those are not "archbar" designs. You should read Joe Strapac's books on GE & B-W electric locos.

Will

Kitbash0n30
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Then I need some help seeing how those sideframes are not of configuration generally termed arch bar.
that sure seems to be what that sideframe style generally is called
http://www2.irm.org/blogs/archives/1435-Wood-Shop-Update-March-27,-2013.html
Item 31, arch bar http://members.kos.net/sdgagnon/sh10.jpg

smokebox
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HIYA..

I have to agree with kitbash!!

EVEN "if " what they are is what they are not...

If it walks like a duck and if it quacks I'm gona call it dinner.

Smokebox

Orangeline Mike
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Hope that the following info helps out:

TMER&L locomotive L1            60,200 lbs
                               L3, L4    103,470 lbs
                               L5          108,400 lbs
                               L8          107,400 lbs
                               L9, L10  105,700 lbs

TMER&L is The Milwaukee Electric Railway and Light Company (TM for short).  CERA did an excellent history on this company (TM, Bulletin 112, 1972).  The information on these locomotives comes from the work equipment roster in that Bulletin.

While the trucks do resemble arch-bars, they were TM's own design.  These locomotives were built by TM, and with the exception of L1, were used to haul coal hoppers from railroad interchanges to the power plant.  Several of these locomotives survive in Illinois and Wisconsin museums.

Wisconsin Power and Light rebuilt a work car into a steeplecab while keeping the archbar trucks.  That effort tipped the scales at 66,000 lbs according to CERA Bulletin 111 - Badger Traction.  This is probably more typical than the TM motors.

I guess the moral of the story is that if the trucks are built stout enough you can definitely get into the "big critter" stage.

Mike Peters
Orangeline Mike


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