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LED Lighting?
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 Posted: Wed Jul 10th, 2013 12:07 pm
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slateworks
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Thanks Martin. Added link to the "saved sources".

Doug



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 Posted: Sun Jul 14th, 2013 06:06 pm
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OhioMike
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Im interested in this LED strip or string light concept. I am doing a dbl level layout, with the On30 on the bottom and a HO layout on the upper level. Would like to have the lighting for the lower level mounted obviously to the bottom of the upper level. Instead of flourescent units, the idea of LED strings/strips is a better alternative for me. If their bright enough????
Mike

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 Posted: Sun Jul 14th, 2013 09:03 pm
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Milocomarty
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They are Mike if you take the 5050 smd's, my Nolans Wharf is led lighted only..





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 Posted: Mon Jul 15th, 2013 02:20 am
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Lost Creek RR
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Here is a link to a clinic done on LED lighting at our last N Scale convention held in April this year.
It was given by one of my friends who has them installed on his HO double deck layout.
It might be of some help.

http://www.melbntrak.com/ledllm.pdf

Rod.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 18th, 2013 01:34 pm
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OhioMike
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Thanks Martin, thanks Rod. Probably will need 3 of these strings unless i need to dbl up for the added briteness(for lack of a better word). Can you run 3-6 of these off a sngl 12v power source/computer power unit/transformer, etc.?
Thanks
Mike

ps..Martin, can you give me more details on your set up there with how many leds, power source, and heigth of the lights above the layout?

Last edited on Thu Jul 18th, 2013 07:47 pm by OhioMike

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 Posted: Thu Jul 18th, 2013 06:33 pm
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tebee
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I've just bought one of these http://www.ebay.com/itm/120776641638?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

$5.58 for a 5m strip including free delivery - it works, but I've not had a chance to work out how effective it is. It is only the less powerful 3528 leds though

Tom



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 Posted: Fri Jul 19th, 2013 09:07 am
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Milocomarty
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OhioMike wrote:


ps..Martin, can you give me more details on your set up there with how many leds, power source, and heigth of the lights above the layout?


The Nolans Wharf modules have 2 warmwhite and one RGB strip on a 2' distance from the track. On the layout it's a 4" more. The warmwhite strips to the front and back, the RGB in the middle. Keep in mind the led's have a 120 degree angle. There's a 150W powersource somewhere L: they gave me the specs that powerconsumption is a 14,4W / meter..with the 5050 smd's



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 Posted: Sat Dec 13th, 2014 05:58 am
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Kent K
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Brad,
As an electrical engineer type by training, I might suggest that you look at the component data sheets available from the parts supplier. The have a standardized format which is used throughout the electronics industry as a basis for comparing and specifying the parts which go into products. If these data sheets do not include everything you want to know about them, they would at least provide you with a starting point.

Vendors such as TI, Intel, AMD, Fujitsu, and others often have catalogs of their parts. I have not checked to see whether or not these are already available in an electronic form, but if they are, they would save you an awfully lot of data entry. Getting the things into that spreadsheet is going to be a time intensive process. If it's already been done, I'm sure you could use the time to build models and run trains rather than duplicate what is already available.

Just my $0.02.



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 Posted: Sun Dec 14th, 2014 12:38 am
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FlyTyinFool
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I appreciate you starting this thread, a lot.

Some notes on Kelvin and color...

Kelvin is extremely important. It is THE standard measure of color for LED lamps.

Without the Kelvin (temperature) reading, it would be like saying, "I like trucks." Well.. is that semi trucks, little Ford Ranger trucks, or 1920's open-cab trucks? Or, "I like brown." Would that be dark tan, earth, or burnt sienna? There are huge differences.

"Color" is open to interpretation, while Kelvin is a fixed, measurable, value.

Examples:
3,000 Kelvin is white with a yellow hue. Lower Kelvin is yellower.
4,000 Kelvin is white (4200, specifically, is considered daylight)
5,000 Kelvin is white with a blueish hue (think headlights on a Mercedes, or Audi). Higher Kelvin is bluer (i.e. 6,000 Kelvin has a purple hue to it, like the headlights on the rice-burners that kids drive).

On an related note, LED bulbs are available in a all range of colors (Kelvin). Relatively new technology in the Aquarium field too. An LED lamp set (the hood) can emulate a full, accurate, 24 hour cycle of colors. From a bright sunny day, to night, and even a cloudy day. The LED lamps in the hood all change colors to generate the perfect mix. These are being used for salt water aquariums, and especially for aquatic vegetation tanks (few/no fish) that require very specific lighting conditions to promote growth.

I hope this helps, and thanks again for taking this on. I'm very interested in using LED's for my layout, and this thread will be an invaluable source for information.


Mark W Sailors



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 Posted: Tue Dec 16th, 2014 02:04 am
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bobquincy
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To add to this, the CRI (color rendering index) is as important as the color temperature.  Most LEDs have large spikes and dips in the spectrum and can render some colors too intense while others are almost absent.  A CRI of 90 or above is often considered good enough for accurate color rendition and there are only two LED bulbs that reach that number (that I know of at this time), GE Reveal and Cree TW.

An art museum in Minneapolis is using these for their lighting after much research into the issue.



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