Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register

Freerails IS ACCEPTING new Members ... To join Freerails ... See how to Register as a Member in the 'Joining Freerails' Forum

Alberta Railways
 Moderated by: . Page:    1  2  3  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Wed Nov 13th, 2013 01:47 pm
  PMQuoteReply
1st Post
Alwin
Registered


Joined: Sat Jun 29th, 2013
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 620
Status: 
Offline
Some very nice photo's on this page:
http://railways.library.ualberta.ca/SidingsType-Photographs/

Especially take a look at the following photo's:
http://railways.library.ualberta.ca/Photos-11-7-1/
All the photo's in the "bridge" section.
http://railways.library.ualberta.ca/Photos-12-9-2/

Alwin

Back To Top

 Posted: Wed Nov 13th, 2013 03:50 pm
  PMQuoteReply
2nd Post
jtrain
Registered


Joined: Sun May 27th, 2012
Location: Missoula, Montana USA
Posts: 1006
Status: 
Offline
In the second link, are those wooden rails? I'd like to see an operating model of that. :)

Wood no produce electricity

Thanks for the link to the website, didn't even know this one existed. If I ever do Canadian Rockies modeling, this will be the first site I consult. It's also neat to look at because in the plains of Minnesota, the Canadian Pacific is king.

-James:java:

Last edited on Wed Nov 13th, 2013 03:55 pm by jtrain



____________________
James W.

New Blog (permanent this time)

blackhillsrr.blogspot.com
Back To Top

 Posted: Wed Nov 13th, 2013 06:44 pm
  PMQuoteReply
3rd Post
W C Greene
Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Royse City, Texas USA
Posts: 8193
Status: 
Offline
James-a wooden/pole road is possible using r/c with onboard batteries. I have thought about it some, another idea that may sometime become reality. Just think "out of the tiny box" and you can do anything.

Woodie



____________________
It doesn't matter if you win or lose, its' how you rig the game.
Back To Top

 Posted: Wed Nov 13th, 2013 07:46 pm
  PMQuoteReply
4th Post
jtrain
Registered


Joined: Sun May 27th, 2012
Location: Missoula, Montana USA
Posts: 1006
Status: 
Offline
Woodie comes to the defense of... wood as a ROW.

I see your point, R/C is possible, in fact it is very possible. Just don't get termites or your roadbed maintenance will go trough the roof:):moose:

--James:java:



____________________
James W.

New Blog (permanent this time)

blackhillsrr.blogspot.com
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Nov 14th, 2013 08:59 pm
  PMQuoteReply
5th Post
Tileguy
Registered


Joined: Tue Jan 24th, 2006
Location: Warba, Minnesota USA
Posts: 1750
Status: 
Offline
Actually BNSF still has way more ton/miles than Canadian Pacific in Minnesota, Even with their purchase of the DM&IR. BNSF hauls More Grain, More Coal and an extreme amount more of General freight and TTX....CP will never replace the DM&IR in my heart and Soul, I was BORN and Raised in PROCTOR, Home of the DM&IR and the Switching Yard was my Playground..The DM&IR had some of the Best Locomotive Mechanics in the WORLD...Even the Burlington Northerns Top Mechanics grudgingly admitted that the SD9 converion called the SDM was the Best locomotive of its time for the area and could get a heavy consist over the hump heading to allouez yard where 2 SD9's couldnt...THE CP scored huge in many ways when they purchased the DM&IR from USS...But the Local workers in Proctor wouldnt say they got the best end of the deal!L:



____________________
Todd
There once was a man from Nantucket ;)
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Nov 15th, 2013 12:44 am
  PMQuoteReply
6th Post
jtrain
Registered


Joined: Sun May 27th, 2012
Location: Missoula, Montana USA
Posts: 1006
Status: 
Offline
DM&IR is a great railroad, no doubt. But I grew up in Glenwood, MN and the SOO Line (CP Rail) is what I remember. Not to underscore either the BNSF or the DM&IR's influence in the state. Indeed on grounds of track age, tonnage hauled, and in the case of the DM&IR, in the heritage of Minnesota, perhaps one or both railways deserve that title. But when it comes to personal opinion, CP Rail is what runs through my mind.

Of course we all have our favorites, and as I said, the DM&IR is a great railroad.

cheers,

James:2t:



____________________
James W.

New Blog (permanent this time)

blackhillsrr.blogspot.com
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Nov 15th, 2013 01:03 am
  PMQuoteReply
7th Post
Herb Kephart
Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 6017
Status: 
Offline
If you blow up the photo in the second link, you can see that the "rail" is made of two planks stood on edge. Ignore the section of track nearest the camera--it has to move across the ties to "throw" the switch. The photo will stand quite a bit of enlargement. Now, what holds the planks to the ties? What holds the "rail" in gauge? No sign of rebates cut into the ties. For that matter, what holds the two planks together--although they may just be face nailed? Considering that green wood must have been used, I wonder if this was an experiment that failed once the wood began to dry out and twist. Would be interesting to know. Anybody have bound volumes of Railway Age from back then? Should only take a few months to find it IF it was written up--but a lot of wiftier stuff got reported by companies or railroads looking for some "print".

Herb



____________________
Fix it again, Mr Gates--it still works!"
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Nov 15th, 2013 05:28 am
  PMQuoteReply
8th Post
2foot6
Registered


Joined: Sun Oct 20th, 2013
Location:  Victoria, Australia
Posts: 415
Status: 
Online
Hi Herb ,if you have a closer look,I think you will find the rails are are one plank(3 x 4 ?)with a flat bar pinned(1. 1/2 x 3/8 ?)to the top of the plank.You can see a height difference on the rail top near the trolley wheels and a shadow in the rail tops for the length of the rails,also there are round dots on the bar above the ties.I would assume these pins(bridge nails) go through to the ties to keep the guage. This was a common practice in Australia on wooden tramlines,especially on the outside rail on curves,or where very heavy loads were being carried(The last step before going to steel rail as a cost saving) Peter.:old dude:

Last edited on Fri Nov 15th, 2013 05:47 am by 2foot6



____________________
I aspire to inspire before I expire.
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Nov 15th, 2013 02:55 pm
  PMQuoteReply
9th Post
Herb Kephart
Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 6017
Status: 
Offline
Looks like you are right. I convinced myself that the field edge of the iron was a separation mark in the wood. In that case, the curved wood must have been sawed. Can't picture a piece of wood that large being bent ( and staying bent) under the conditions certain when the pix was taken.

Thanks for the info, and the correction.

Herb



____________________
Fix it again, Mr Gates--it still works!"
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Nov 15th, 2013 04:44 pm
  PMQuoteReply
10th Post
W C Greene
Moderator


Joined: Fri May 4th, 2007
Location: Royse City, Texas USA
Posts: 8193
Status: 
Offline
OK, here's what MAY be an urban legend...way back when, out west in Wyoming or some other place, a railroad was built with wooden rails. Now, the builders thought that rawhide would last almost as long as steel and was cheap...just kill some buffalos...so they attached rawhide strips to the tops of the rails. This railroad got the name "Rawhide Central". Apparently the "experiment" ended when it became known that coyotes loved to chew the rawhide strips and that screwed up the line. Whether this is true or not, it COULD be a neat idea for a model...now, who makes scale model coyotes?
What does this have to do with Alberta Railways? Who knows but you know how threads kinda get sideways around here from time to time (almost always).

Woodrow



____________________
It doesn't matter if you win or lose, its' how you rig the game.
Back To Top


 Current time is 10:37 pm
Page:    1  2  3  Next Page Last Page  

Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems