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Typical Yard Trackwork For D.& R.G.W. / R.G.S. Narrow Gauge
 Moderated by: Herb Kephart Page:    1  2  3  4  Next Page Last Page  
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 Posted: Sun Dec 22nd, 2013 11:14 pm
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Salada
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Two things are immediately obvious to a foreign (European) observer of the US South West NG railroad scene:

1) Yard track layouts are very 'relaxed' and spacious; hardly surprising in such a big country.

2) Yard layout and the positioning of switches is very simple (contrast to photo below).

I am trying to cram a small section of typical D&RGW practice in On30 into a fairly small space so it would be helpful to use what I believe you call 'Puzzle Switches' to maximise operation possibilities within the small space that I have available. However, I am aiming at a visually accurate representation of a SW US railroad and despite having studied many photos I have not seen one Puzzle Switch (i.e. Single or Double Slip, nor even a Diamond (X shaped) crossover on a CO, NM, AZ NG system. If their use is not prototypical then I will have to avoid using them (back to the layout planning scribbles).


Ah, the "G" button has disappeared from the New Topic Toolbar so no photo for now.

Happy Christmas & a Great New Year to All

Regards Michael

Last edited on Sun Dec 22nd, 2013 11:15 pm by Salada

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 Posted: Mon Dec 23rd, 2013 01:31 am
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bill
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I believe that no US western NG RR ever attempted to use slip switches. Although I haven't seen photographic proof, I expect that the very reason that the narrow gauge was used was for cost and simplicity reasons. Almost all of the western NG RRs were constructed in rugged mountainous areas and there was no need for the complicated trackwork associated with slip switches. I haven't seen or heard of a narrow gauge crossing being used, but it is likely that at least one RR has used one somewhere.

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 Posted: Mon Dec 23rd, 2013 01:54 am
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NathanO
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The other thing about the D&RGW was a lot of it's equipment was very near, if not full standard gauge width.

Nathan

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 Posted: Mon Dec 23rd, 2013 07:59 pm
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Helmut
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bill wrote: I believe that no US western NG RR ever attempted to use slip switches. Although I haven't seen photographic proof.... I would have joined the same bandwagon, yet stumbled across this quotation. Now, let's dig that photo out...
Addendum:
This map of Boston harbour clearly shows the double slip next to where the rails cross Marginal Street.

Last edited on Mon Dec 23rd, 2013 08:22 pm by Helmut



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 Posted: Mon Dec 23rd, 2013 08:58 pm
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Salada
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My thanks to Bill & NathanO. You have probably explained the reasons :
low cost + simplicity + unlimited space = simple trackwork.

Thanks to Helmut for the details of the BR&L RR. Blowing your maps up large I am unconvinced about the "three way stub" as quoted but there looks to be a Diamond (X)and possibly a single slip - looking at the operational possibilities a double slip does not make sense (just before the railway underbridge). Fascinating photo of a Mason Bogie !! - would make a lovely model. This might confirm the comments of Bill & NathanO - this is a crowded E Coast location, not the open skies of CO or NM.
Regards Michael

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 Posted: Tue Dec 24th, 2013 02:26 am
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Herb Kephart
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There is a 3' gage 3 way stub switch in the yard at Rockhill Furnace on the East Broad Top

Herb



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 Posted: Tue Dec 24th, 2013 05:10 am
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jtrain
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Bg space does make for simple track work, but perhaps also for boring operations. I like simple, don't get me wrong, but there is a such a thing as too simple. If looking for prototype accuracy, best keep the track arrangement free of all these specialty switches. However, I would make an exception for diamonds, stub switches and three way turnouts. Diamonds would be used when two track need to cross, but there is no room or material to build one track over the other. Believe it or not, Durango is flat and the first three-four miles aren't too hilly. There surely was a diamond or two in there somewhere. Also, the Cumbers and Toltec I thought had a diamond or two as well, but I may be wrong.

As Herb has shown, three way switches are rare, but they do exist. Stub switches were used on any narrow gauge lines, D&RGW included, up until the early 1900's. You'd see these turnouts not on the mainline, but rather in the backwoods lines that went into individual mine sites.

So, large space? Yes. Simple track? Yes. Good reasons to not have complicated or specialty track items? Yes. But there are exceptions, and these exceptions are what makes a model unique from the others.

Prototype or not, a fun track plan is something I can hardly pass up. Either way, can't wait to see more work from you Michael.:glad:

--James



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 Posted: Tue Dec 24th, 2013 10:49 am
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Salada
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So following your logic Herb, one in four aren't human ?
(thinking about it that could be about right !)

Lovely photos Herb and an interesting looking bogie hopper (gondola). Stub switches - fascinating things, unknown here, but presumably only for very low speed use & short wheelbase cars & locos ?. Presumably something like a Consolidated couldn't manage the rather abrupt change of direction ?.

Happy Christmas & no doubt a wee dram or two for Hogmanay.

Regards Michael

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 Posted: Tue Dec 24th, 2013 11:53 am
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Salada
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Hi James,

A very good point (pun intended) - operational interest versus prototype accuracy - how do you resolve that in a limited space ?.

I'm building my RR the wrong way round but hopefully for good reasons. Firstly I am researching & modelling suitable CO, NM,AZ NG infrastucture - buildings, depots, rail served industries etc., almost as individual mini-dioramas. Meantime I'm researching the relevant US NG prototype operating practice, such as yard/depot layout, whilst figuring out how to connect the track system to each pre-built structure/rail user.

This is because genuine US SouthWest NG practice is so different to UK/European - almost no signals,single line 'main line', 'section houses','division points' - what's all that about then ?? But I'm slowly getting there thanks to Google etc. & the great help I've had so far from the Freerails gang. It also gives me plenty of 'track/layout' design doodle time; "Chavez Junction" only exists in my head right now, it may even change name. I'm not a great modeller but I want it to LOOK right.

Regards & Enjoy Riding the Rails ! Michael

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 Posted: Tue Dec 24th, 2013 12:13 pm
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Helmut
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Having seen this, I imagine that some n.g. RR could have built that, too.



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