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A list of all scale/gauge combinations
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 Posted: Wed Jan 1st, 2014 07:21 pm
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jtrain
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Edit:

I have a pdf uploaded through googledocs. So far I have 80 different scale/gauge combinations including US, UK, Europe, and Japan, plus a scale or two that was born on the Internet in recent times. Check it out below: PDF updated 1/3/2014

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B9_DbG1AjDdARjY4SW9MZmxELXM/edit

I have included:

The name of the scale
The scale ratio
The gauge of the track in millimeter
The gauge of the track in inches
The prototype gauge the scale represents
The length of a US 40ft boxcar in that scale
It's status as a model railroad scale (Dead, New, Rare, Popular, Alive and well)
And one or two notes about the scale as a whole

As for my status ranking:

Dead means that the scale virtually is non-existent in the commercial and in the private spheres.
New means that the scale has grown from nothing within the last 2 decades.
Rare means that the scale is not popular, and few commercial products are available.
Popular means that a significant portion of the modeling community has used the scale before in a layout, or for a model.
Alive is the category for scales that aren't all that popular, but many know of their existence and a few have built and publicized layouts in the public sphere.


Many have listed and explained the common scales and gauges used in the US and in the UK. However: None of these lists have been complete. What I' trying to do is create a list of all the scale/ gauge combinations from both the US and UK including large scale, live steam, unique narrow gauge scales like Gn15 as well as all the scales larger than G scale including the "ride on" and "ride in" scales where people ride on or in their models around the yard or park.

What I need the good folks at freerails to help with is to check my pdf above.

1/3/2014: Woodie has brought up a good question which I was wondering myself, "What makes a scale legitimate and noteworthy?" As everyone on freerails has shown, a scale/gauge combination doesn't have to be popular or well known to be considered a modeling scale. To keep outlying scale/gauge combinations, I've come up with a requirement in order for a scale/gauge to be shown on the list:

The scale/gauge combination in question must be able to meet at least two of the following:

A. The scale/gauge combination is modeled by multiple modelers.

B. At least one fully operational railroad must exist to demonstrate the abilities of the scale/gauge combination.

C. The scale/gauge combination is supported by at least one club/organization of private modelers or an international organization such as the NMRA.

D. The scale/gauge combination has commercial products available in either railway equipment, structures, vehicles, and/or figures.

E. The scale/gauge combination has been recognized in a magazine, book, or other publication that is in print. This requirement excludes online publications with the exception of online magazines which have an editor, multiple writers, and advertising as seen in any other magazine.

*Proof of the requirements, with the exception of requirement option E, can be through online or through print.*

Only two requirements must be met to be put on the list, if one or neither is met, then I cannot consider the scale/gauge combination to be a legitimate scale for model trains. While I don't like regulation, I understand that basic requirements are required to keep this list strictly to model railroad scales. I am happy to say that thus far, every scale/gauge combination brought to my attention has met the above requirements.

Also, if a scale/ gauge combo is incorrect, please let me know either through a blog comment or through a reply on this topic or PM. Thank you so much and have a Happy New Year!

--James:java:

Last edited on Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 11:37 pm by jtrain



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 Posted: Wed Jan 1st, 2014 09:21 pm
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NathanO
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At one time there was what was called triple 'O' OOO that was 2mm = 1 Ft. 1 to 152.4 It tried to compete with N Scale in the US but lost out.

Nathan

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 Posted: Wed Jan 1st, 2014 10:17 pm
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Huw Griffiths
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Trying to compile a complete scale / gauge list strikes me as a very difficult endeavour - good luck!


There's also a scale / gauge called T - which I believe to be 1:450 scale, on 3mm track.

I don't know a lot about it - but believe the RTR stuff tends to be Japanese outline.

This combo has its own area on the UK site modelrailforum.com - with some people fitting (etched brass?) UK outline bodies to Japanese RTR chassis.


OO9 - 1:76 scale on 9mm track - also has a niche following, with its own scale / gauge society. There have also been a few exhibition layouts in this scale / gauge combo.

A number of model trams are built to 1:16 and 1:32 scales. I don't know a lot about these scales - except that I've sometimes seen some very impressive models at exhibitions and in museums. There's more information in the "modelling standards" section of the Tramway & Light Railway Society website.



As you might be aware, on the European mainland, O is a different scale to both the US and the UK - 1:45.

There are also a number of distinctive "local" narrow gauge scales as well - for example:

Om is 1:45 scale representing metre gauge (I'm not sure of the model track gauge - but I'm sure some of our German members would know).

Oe is a generic gauge (which I happen to like) - 1:45 scale on 16.5mm ("HO") track.


HOm is 1:87 scale representing metre gauge.

HOe is another generic gauge - 1:87 scale on 9mm ("N gauge") track.


I hope this is of some help.

Regards,

Huw.

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 Posted: Thu Jan 2nd, 2014 01:06 am
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jtrain
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Huw,
My calculations for the Om seem to be about 22mm, which I guess is reasonable.

And HOe is basically HOn3 in the US, but I've added that in.

Thank you for the scales you mentioned, I certainly wouldn't want to leave out OO9 or for that matter OO7. I've also got T scale in my spreadsheet. Once again, thank you, that was very helpful.

Nathan,

I'm glad you brought up OOO, I've added it to my spreadsheet.

I am now at 68 scales/gauges, Let's see if we can't make it 70.

Any other scales?

--James:java:



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 Posted: Thu Jan 2nd, 2014 03:24 pm
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jtrain
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Okay, now I'm at 69 different scale/gauge combos. I missed OOn3 scale: OO running on 12mm track.

Still trying for 70!:rah:

--James:java:



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 Posted: Thu Jan 2nd, 2014 04:05 pm
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jtrain
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Just made it to 75 scale/gauge combinations!

Let's go for 80.

--James



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 Posted: Thu Jan 2nd, 2014 07:10 pm
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ddonley
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Have you put in On18 (width of n scale track in O) and On20 (width of hon3 track in O)?



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 Posted: Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 12:06 am
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jtrain
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Added On18 this morning, but not On20. Is this the O scale that is the US 1/48 size or the UK 1/45 size? Thanks.

--James:java:



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 Posted: Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 02:08 am
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W C Greene
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I think it's 1:48...On20. That's what I built as the Gila Tram.

Woodie



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 Posted: Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 02:31 am
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Dawg
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How about these combo's, which I also model in
7/8n18 = 1/13.7 on 32mm,
1/12n15= 1" on 32mm,
1/12n18= 1" on 45mm

Last edited on Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 02:35 am by Dawg



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