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A list of all scale/gauge combinations
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 Posted: Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 05:11 am
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jtrain
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Thank you Woodie and Dawg, your input was most helpful. On the first post at the top of the page, I updated the pdf to include the added scales and gauges. I also cleared up some confusion I had between US and UK scales. Sadly, one scale I had to delete since it was the UK equivalent of a US scale with no apparent difference other than the name.

Despite this, the additional scales offered through the folks on freerails including Nathan, Huw, ddonley, Woodie and Dawg plus some hard searching of my own; the official number of scale/ gauge combinations in known existence is now a solid 80!

This includes every standard and narrow gauge scale combination from T scale all the way up to the largest gauge used by live steam enthusiasts, 15 inch gauge.

While the gauges could get larger, I had to draw the line so I chose 15 inch as the ceiling, being that anything larger is basically a real train.

We can think hard and get to 85 perhaps with more input, but I'd say there is no list this complete. All scales from T scale to 15 inch gauge, and from 3mm to 381mm gauge track. If more come to my attention, I'll certainly add it.

I plan to use this as a reference, that I hope will be helpful to beginners. As most of us know, major magazines only talk about the major scales: Z,N,HO,S,O,G in the US and N,HO,OO,O,Gauge 1 in the UK. But as this pdf demonstrates, there are numerous other scales, and dozens of different scale/gauge combinations.

So if this tells beginners nothing else, it should say this:

Walking into this hobby, there are so many choices for scale and gauge, that really there is something perfect for everyone. And that's what I like about this hobby, you can make it your own just as others have in creating and expanding the number of options available today.

Thank you for everyone's help so far, but let's try for 85 shall we?:rah:

--James:java:



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 Posted: Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 08:14 am
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Helmut
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Another rarely used ( but there was a big installation in the US ) ride-on-scale is 9.5" representing 2" to the foot for SG. Scale ratio is 1:6 then.
I use this gauge at a ratio of 1:2.5 to represent 60cm ( 10mm less than 2' ) tram operations in my garden.
BTW, Z gauge is 6.5mm, not 6.
000 is called 2mm scale nowadays and runs on 9.5mm track. There is a society in the UK promoting it.
Don't forget 'Japanese H0' scaling 1:60 on H0 track, representing the erstwhile Japanese Standard Gauge of 42".

P.S.
Some of my remarks are superfluous with respect to the .pdf document. I took the website as a reference.

Last edited on Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 09:25 am by Helmut



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 Posted: Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 12:36 pm
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fallen
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This is a really useful thing to do - thanks.

A couple of points from a UK perspective.

TT (UK) is not dead, there is an active group of modellers and Commercial support from a few kit manufacturers.

You could add SM32 which is 16mm:ft scale on 32mm track gauge, modelling 2ft narrow gauge, widely used in the UK for garden railways with live steam locos. Again, and active group of modellers, lots of kits and some ready to run especially live steam and battery locos. Many are easily regauged between 32mm and 45mm, so can also run on G scale track.

Frank

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 Posted: Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 02:23 pm
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W C Greene
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Just remember that somewhere there's a modeller building something in 1:27.956 scale running on 14.335MM gauge or some such and that one modeller wants to be recognized as building in a "normal scale" and hopes that supplies become available in his/her scale but wonders why nobody else is interested. Perhaps it is time for "expanda-scale" so as to cover all bases.

My feeble mind is reeling or maybe reeking...I am gonna take up catching rare butterflies or postage stamps from Roman times...

Woodie-I think that's who I am right now



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 Posted: Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 04:24 pm
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jtrain
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Helmut:

Thanks for bringing the OOO to my attention, the traditional OOO died out, but it looks like a modern society promotes the same scale with a different gauge than the earlier OOO, so I added that in as a different scale/gauge combo.
The Z gauge error I corrected in the pdf. I think I'll have to edit my blog post or post a more accurate version.
I did include the 9 1/2" riding gauge. Since riding scales are classified according to gauge and not scale, gauge takes precedence over scale in this instance. I will put in the pdf that the gauge can be used to represent both standard and narrow gauge.

For Japanese H0, I'll be happy to include it, except that most everything says that Japanese H0 is 1:80 and not 1:60. If that's true, then I already have the scale/gauge listed in the pdf.

Is anyone able to clarify which it is, 1:80 or 1:60? Or are there in fact two separate scale/gauge combinations in Japan with the same name?

Once again, thank you for clarifying and bringing to my attention some errors and oversights.

--James:java:



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 Posted: Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 04:35 pm
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jtrain
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Frank:

Thank you for pointing out that the UK TT scale is infact alive and well. I've corrected the error on the pdf, and will update the online version shortly.

Also, Thank you for reminding me about SM32. I included the 1:19 scale running on 45mm track, but I forgot about the 32mm version. So I've labeled the 45mm version '1:19 (SM45)' and the 32mm version the appropriate 'SM32' with a footnote that SM32 can be re-gauged to 45mm. There seems to be some confusion online as to whether 1:19 on 45mm track is '1:19 scale' or if it is 'SM45'.

Anyone know what the proper term for 1:19 on 45mm track is?

Thank you.

--James:java:



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 Posted: Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 05:19 pm
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jtrain
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Woodie:

You are quite right, I can't include every single combination that someone somewhere invented and is unknown to the rest of the world.

Though I like out of the box thinking, there should be some requirements for this list.

So, here are the basic requirements I think makes a scale legitimate; it is used by multiple people with operational layouts and has been recognized either by individuals, a company, an organization/club, or a publication.

That said, here is the requirements in detail->

The scale/gauge combination in question must be able to meet at least two of the following:

A. The scale/gauge combination is modeled by multiple modelers.

B. At least one fully operational railroad must exist to demonstrate the abilities of the scale/gauge combination.

C. The scale/gauge combination is supported by at least one club/organization of private modelers or an international organization such as the NMRA.

D. The scale/gauge combination has commercial products available in either railway equipment, structures, vehicles, and/or figures.

E. The scale/gauge combination has been recognized in a magazine, book, or other publication that is in print. This requirement excludes online publications with the exception of online magazines which have an editor, multiple writers, and advertising as seen in any other magazine.

Keep in mind, only two requirements need to be met. I think that this test is fair enough. We'll take M scale as an example...

M scale has one fully operational layout (your layout), and also has a commercial with military figures and vehicles plus the occasional structure. In addition, 1:35, the military counterpart for M scale trains, has been recognized numerous times in several magazines.

Therefore M scale is a legitimate scale in meeting these requirements.

Now let's look at the unknown scale of 1:27.956 running on 14.335mm track:

Perhaps one successful layout has been built by the sole operator of the scale, but the scale/gauge hasn't been published in any magazine or book or other print, there is no commercial products available, the scale is not supported by either a private club or a large organization, and finally, only that individual uses that scale/gauge combination.

So this unknown scale is only meeting one requirement, and therefore is exempt from the list. However if the scale/gauge combination ever meets two requirements or more, it will be accepted.

Before anyone jumps at me for excluding a particular scale/gauge, I'll wrap up the post with this:

You can please some people all of the time, you can please all people some of the time, but you can't please All people All of the time.

I think these requirements are fair in define what is a legitimate scale and not just someone's fantasy. But, if the scale/gauge combination meets at least two of the above requirements, I'll take the scale/gauge combination without question.

Thank you and I hope this eliminates the issue of what is and is not a legitimate scale.

--James:java:

Last edited on Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 05:20 pm by jtrain



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 Posted: Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 05:37 pm
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@jtrain
Oops - another slip.. You're exactly right with respect to Japanese H0 -it is/was 1:80. I mixed that up with a 10-years-era in the 50/60's, when several manufacturers in Germany/Switzerland promoted 1:60 scale to represent Swiss/German metre gauge.

Last edited on Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 05:37 pm by Helmut



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 Posted: Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 05:46 pm
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jtrain
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Helmut,

Thank you for the clarification. In the pdf, I have the scale/gauge used by Japan, so it has been included

--James:java:



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 Posted: Fri Jan 3rd, 2014 07:06 pm
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W C Greene
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OK...gotcha! BTW...there are more guys than me doing 35n2 or Mn2 right now. Does this list include "rubber gaugers"? LOL...ROTFLMAO....

Woodrow



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