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Tracking roadbeds via Google Earth.
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 Posted: Mon Jan 20th, 2014 11:34 am
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Ray Dunakin
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Here's a nice pic of the water tower at Arboles:

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/4809339



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 Posted: Mon Jan 20th, 2014 05:01 pm
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Salada
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Hi James: Yup, you've got both the locations correct. Apparently Pagosa Junct is on an Indian Reservation & according to several US internet sources they still don't take too kindly to The Iron Horse or any attempts at removal/preservation, hence the tank has slowly collapsed into oblivion. It is said that the original RR salvage team had 'some difficulties' here !.

Ray, thanks for the photo link - it is the same tank. Was this a common use of old tender tanks or fairly unusual ?. I wonder why the salvors abandoned the 2 gondolas here ?.

Helmut, I must have missed the site of the junction, I'll have another look.

Regards                     Michael

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 Posted: Mon Jan 20th, 2014 05:20 pm
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jtrain
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Considering it was cheaper to put a tank up on stilts than to build a full water tower, tenders, tank cars, and other water capable containers were common on narrow gauge lines and in the back country. I know that D&S, Cass Scenic Railroad and the 1880 Train use tenders/tank cars for water; although the 1880 train also has a water tower which usually suffices.

--James



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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 04:09 am
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Helmut
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Re: Pagosa Junction -The car seems to be a gondola as shown on these photos.
The Branch to Pagosa Springs - hope I got the coordinates right

Would be interesting to trace what is left of the Uintah Rwy. - so far I found only this what is left of Atchee, CO. Looks like the ruins of the machine shop

Last edited on Tue Jan 21st, 2014 04:50 am by Helmut



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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 02:27 pm
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jtrain
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Helmut,

You got lucky with the Uintah, and so did I...

Here's an interactive map that has already been made by someone working in conjunction with abandonedrails.com:

http://bpratt15.home.bresnan.net/UintahMap2.htm

They got the route about as perfect as you could get.

--James



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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 02:38 pm
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jtrain
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Okay, there are a few instances where the red line deviates from the true roadbed, but it gives you the general direction and location of the actual roadbed.

The great part about the mountains is that when a track was abandoned and taken up, the roadbed would often be the basis of a vehicle road since the path was usually the easiest through the mountains. This appears to be the case with the Uintah.

--James



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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 03:16 pm
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Salada
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So I'm not the only Saddo who spends time tracing old ROW's on Google !!!!

Only joking Gentlemen: but I have the legitimate excuse of researching likely prototypes, types of terrain etc etc.

Helmut: your co-ords spot on for an old grade at Pagosa Junction BUT is it the branch to Pagosa Springs or a turning Wye ? - look carefully, especially further along the 'branch' - the contours look very unfavourable do you think ??

Regards                Michael

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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 03:19 pm
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Salada
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Thanks James; the ex-tender tank on stilts could make a good (genuine) model.

Regards               Michael

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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 06:56 pm
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jtrain
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Remember that gold was the word which brought everything to the mountains, so the railroads were in pursuit of money and had to work to get it. That's how we get The Devil's Gate Bridge along Clear Creek and the High Line along the Animas
From following the map, it appears that the branch to Pagosa Springs started near what is now Navajo State Park along the north end of the lake created by Navajo Dam in New Mexico. One river heads Northeast to Pagosa Springs, another heads Southeast towards Dulce and Chama. Finally, after crossing some open territory, there's a line that heads Northwest from the lake to Durango.

Pagosa Junction is located on the line heading from Chama to Durango, thus it was on the narrow gauge mainline. So more likely than not, Pagosa Junction was a water stop, at atleast that's how it appears.

However I do think you're on to something Michael in that there may be a wye nearby, it looks like the D&RGW was fond of using wyes to turn locomotives when a local freight and passenger train didn't have to go any further along the line. Being water stop Pagosa Junction is a likely candidate.

--James



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James W.

See progress on the Western Logging Railroad:

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 Posted: Wed Jan 22nd, 2014 02:07 pm
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Helmut
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Pagosa Jctn. -
O shame, that's what one gets from wishful thinking. Yes, the wye traces can be distinguished if you look closer.
And yes, the line followed cat creek. A faint trace may be seen here, I think.

Last edited on Wed Jan 22nd, 2014 02:27 pm by Helmut



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