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It's not always rust....
 Moderated by: W C Greene Page:    1  2  3  Next Page Last Page  
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 Posted: Thu Jan 30th, 2014 05:13 am
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Giles
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I thought this could be of some interest – (please forgive the fact that the loco isn't narrow gauge!)

I've recently been taking a slightly different approach to weathering, where it is just 'routine' age and dirt, rather than heavy rust and decrepitude.

One of the fundamental problems with finishes on models in my opinion, is the fact that the paint -even if well applied - is actually quite rough in scale terms, and our first recourse is to coat it in varnish to impose whatever type of gloss/satin/matt finish that we want.

Nowadays I tend to go the other way, and the very first thing I do is polish the main panels of the model to get a good 'scale' finish, upon which I can then apply any weathering I want to. I think this tends to catch the light much better, and can help lift the paint-work of a RTR model, such as this Ixion Fowler, which is straight out of the box (other than the polishing and weathering.)

I flat the panels down with 2000 grit wet-and-dry (used wet) which during the process reveals all the bumps in the paint - and when it's completely flat, I then buff it up having given it a wipe with Duraglit (or similar) silver polish)



Last edited on Thu Jan 30th, 2014 07:22 am by Giles



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 Posted: Thu Jan 30th, 2014 10:39 am
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W C Greene
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Yes, the sheen is the key. Great and very realistic finish. This loco looks like it should. Very, very, very fine.

Woodie



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 Posted: Thu Jan 30th, 2014 03:36 pm
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Rod Hutchinson
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Giles, I like the finish, but have you considered oil & grease and the dirt it captures?



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 Posted: Thu Jan 30th, 2014 11:29 pm
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ModelTrainStructures
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Very nicely done!

D.A.



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 Posted: Fri Jan 31st, 2014 01:01 am
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Ray Dunakin
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Good idea on getting a more scale-like finish!



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 Posted: Fri Jan 31st, 2014 08:41 am
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Giles
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Thank you - I hope it's useful... It's something I worked out when I wanted to improve the look of this car from the supplied gloss, down to a more acceptable finish.





Rod, there's no 'polish' medium left on the model to gather dust or grease, as it's all buffed off.
Once you've worked it flat with the wet and dry, it only needs a very light polish to get the paint up to this very smooth finish - and then you can weather it or do what you want.

Last edited on Fri Jan 31st, 2014 08:47 am by Giles



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Giles

The Loop. 0-16.5
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 Posted: Fri Jan 31st, 2014 10:32 am
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Herb Kephart
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Giles-

Superb look you have created, and BTW I really like the Fowler loco as a prototype, but how do you manage to sand around all the rivets without breaking through the original finish? I know that the stock answer is "very carefully'' but there are hundreds of rivets on thet model, and I don't see any evidence of brass (or whatever the model is made of) showing through. The only way that I would even try to accomplish this would be with a soft toothbrush, and some fine abrasive paste, or liquid.Even then, I could forsee problems with breaking through the finish.

Please tell us more!


Herb




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 Posted: Fri Jan 31st, 2014 03:19 pm
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Rod Hutchinson
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Hi Giles, I have misunderstood. What you have done is get to a starting point, is that correct?

I have been using fibreglass brush where I have painted a model with gloss paint. The fibreglass brush works quite well.



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 Posted: Sat Feb 1st, 2014 04:33 am
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Giles
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Hi Herb,

I flat with the wet-and-dry just in the main panels, and every where, avoiding the rivets - for the very reason you're saying! The next step is polishing. You can limit yourself to mostly polishing up the flatted areas, and If you do this, it leaves a fundamentally 'dirtier' loco. With the Fowler, when polishing I also polished over rivet detail, which hoes quite a long way to matching the flatted panels in replicating the overall fine appearance. On the Ivatt 2-6-0 I did less of this. It's something you can play with!

Hi Rod, yes it creates a starting point, but I think it enables you to achieve a more realistic finish overall, insofar as you are starting off with a more realistic base point.
I did use a fibreglass pen on the nooks and crannies of the car, but I don't use them on the paint on locos, as I simply want to take the surface down to flat!

The Ivatt fully weathered having had it's factory coat cut back and polished as the photo in above post

Last edited on Sat Feb 1st, 2014 04:41 am by Giles



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Giles

The Loop. 0-16.5
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FB2lTF4t4M&feature=plcp&context=C3775db8UDOEgsToPDskI_j5g3O_927OWTefW3AUU-
The End of The Line
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SEo2v9v82Q
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 Posted: Sat Feb 1st, 2014 05:17 am
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Rod Hutchinson
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Giles, Do you think this might work for a finish such as this. It's a satin like finish on plastic.
http://www.editionsatlas.fr/collection/minisite/michelines-et-autorails/micheline-type-5.html



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