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Ore Cars - Scratchbuilt In Brass - HO Scale
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 Posted: Thu Aug 21st, 2014 01:21 am
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Herb Kephart
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Aside from the trucks ( and couplers, if you are brave) needing a dose of the same, the  color overall is very convincing - inside looks particularly good.

An aside. FRA prohibits wheels and coupler knuckles being painted, supposedly making a crack easer to spot. I don't know how far back in time this goes, but any railroad freight car in use for more that a couple months that I ever saw, everything below the floor line was so dirty and rusty that you couldn't tell if it was ever painted anyway.

Since this topic has also discussed soldering, let me share a tip that I have been doing for years. Get two flat pieces of soft pine an appropriate size, and fasten the two long edges together with screws, forming a L. When soldering a side to a car end for example, spike one part to the horizontal board, the other to the vertical one, staying away from the joint area itself. Holds the pieces in alignment and square so all that you have to worry about is th cat knocking the flux bottle on the floor, and soldering the joint. And BTW--if the cat does succeed, see if you can get the cat to lick it up--prevents re-occurrences in the future.:thumb:

Herb



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 Posted: Thu Aug 21st, 2014 08:03 pm
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Alwin
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Thanks Herb. I already gave the trucks a bit of wheatering. I also think that it needs more. Will do that later.

Nice tip for the soldering. So if we are gonna discuss soldering tips again than I ahev a question (not to a specific person):
How do you make a good perpendicular angle? And I meen from the beginning. Which tool for measuring, which tool to make the cut? I can produce pretty good cuts, but two parts which should be identical are not always.
I use a measuring tool with a 180 degree angle desgination and a little metal saw (jeweler's saw). Hold the sawblade almost flat on the metal and look over it. If you just can see the line you drawn on the "good" side than it is alright. But this how I do it.

Back to the orecar. I shot some photo's today on the layout. Even better than in daylight with no background.


Sorry, photo is a bit skewed. 











Alwin

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 Posted: Fri Aug 22nd, 2014 01:07 am
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Herb Kephart
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Alwin

Much better, but I think that I would still do more.

As to making pieces square enough. Buy yourself a machinist's ''combination square", with a cast iron movable head. Dont bother with a centering head, a thing with two 45% sides, or a protractor (settable to any angle) head which are sometimes added to mank a ''set''--unless you think that they will be useful to you in the future. European or Jap are top quality, even Chinese if the price is high enough to indicate a better quality set. Avoid Indian--nothing any good comes out of that place. Lock the head with the clamping screw and scribe a light line on a perfectly straight edge at 90% to the edge. Pick the square up and turn it over so that the head is facing the other way, and scribe another fine line as close to the first one as you can. If the lines look parallel to your eye ( any error will be magnified by 2 doing it this way) fine--it's good enough for what you are going to use it for. If not, send it back as not being accurate.

Now, how to get the piece square. If I'm out where the layout is, I will just file to the line--an Opti-visor is a help with this. Most model work in brass, I do that way (see my series on an Ingersol-Rand boxcab diesel a while back

     http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=2418&forum_id=50&page=1

But since my sons and I have a complete machine shop, things like the gearbox housings were done on a Cincinnati vertical milling machine--a little beyond what most (except that rascal Bernd) modelers have.

Herb

Herb



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 Posted: Fri Aug 22nd, 2014 06:34 pm
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Alwin
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Thanks Herb. I'm going on vacation for a week but after that I look around for the combination square.
The brass work in the link you posted makes me jealous. I've got the feeling I am a real amature (which I am :bg:) when I look at that. Very well done!

Btw, I haven't done anything to the trucks. The weathering was still the same.

Alwin

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 Posted: Sun Aug 24th, 2014 06:15 pm
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Shoulders
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Hay Alwin

The ore cars look good and I like the ore tippler thing.

Cheers Dan



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 Posted: Sun Dec 28th, 2014 09:13 pm
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Alwin
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Made a start on number two. I won't show al the in progress shot's, you can see those of the first car if you want.
The photo shows the car from the underside, the finished car is behind it and a ruler in the foreground.



Alwin

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 Posted: Tue Dec 30th, 2014 09:00 pm
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Alwin
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Underframe is done and so are the reinforcement profiles on the front and end. The profiles on the sides has to be done and then it's time for small details.



Alwin

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 Posted: Sun Jan 4th, 2015 07:46 pm
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Shoulders
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Hi Alwin

Your doing a very good job so far mate.

At engineering school I was told the following:-

I use engineer's blue or a marker pen to colour the bass, scriber, steel rule and an engineers square.

1st
colour the brass using engineers ink or marker pen

2nd

Scribe the brass along one edge with a scriber and steel rule.

3rd

Place the sheet brass with the scribed line vertical in a smooth soft jaw vice and cut down words with a piercing saw just out side the line you wish to cut (Not inside).

2nd

Reposition the brass sheet so the line is now horizontally positioned in the vice. With the use of a large very fine and dead flat file, file the brass along the full length one stroke at a time in one direction only going away from you until you reach the line. (Whilst doing this constantly check with a steal rule by holding the steel rule against the cut edge/line and then holding it up to the light, if you see any light then the cut is un-even and if there is no day light can be seen all the way along length then the cut is straight.

This now give you a piece of brass with a dead straight edge to work from.

4th

Making a 90% cut

Check the square is square by drawing a 90% line with the square on a piece of scrap, flip the square over and draw another line. Hopefully the line is exactly parallel as the first.

5th

Now we can start drawing out the 90% cut we wish to make on the sheet of brass by holding the square on the dead straight edge of the brass sheet we are using. When happy scribe the sheet and then use the same cutting and filling methods as used as mentioned previous. This should give you a dead straight 90% cut.



The piece of brass, plasticard or wood must have one straight edge to work, having a good square with no straight line to work from doesn't give you a 90% angle. Any bowing or wavy line on the edge we are working from means the square will sit -or+ of the 90% angle you wish to make.

I hope this helps and I have explained it clear enough. I was never good at English (grammar and spellings).

Kind regards Dan



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 Posted: Wed Jan 7th, 2015 08:45 pm
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Alwin
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A quick update. The brass work on the second one is ready. Have painted it also and did some weathering on it. Some details of the break system and the trucks has to be done.

Sorry for the bad lighting of the first photo.



A photo of the inside. Weathered with different colors of powder.

Alwin


Last edited on Wed Jan 7th, 2015 08:46 pm by Alwin

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 Posted: Thu Jan 8th, 2015 04:56 am
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Salada
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Looking very good Alwin, fancy making a few under contract ?!

Regards. Michael

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