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Oil Storage Tank - Painting Step-By-Step
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 Posted: Tue Apr 22nd, 2014 10:38 pm
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eTraxx
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I had thought to post this in the scratchbuilding forum but on second thought it probably is better here - the build itself is pretty much standard/simple.

My Pumphouse uses an oil-engine. In essence it’s much like a diesel in that it is a compression-ignition engine but used oil instead of diesel for a fuel. I need a tank .. if or no other reason then it adds to the scene.

I used some CPVC tubing for the body – two 1″ caps, a coupling and a couple of reducing bushings. I then wrapped that with some cardstock to simulate metal plates.

Here I stuck a couple of dowels through the bottom for further work .. this is where it would go.

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 Posted: Tue Apr 22nd, 2014 10:40 pm
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Here I have installed the suction flange, manhole-cover and vent tube. That’s an oops. Why you shouldn't model while drinking beer I suppose. The vent tube for a tank of this sort should be about 1-1/2″ pipe. Think this is about 4″.

After this photo was taken I said the heck with it and removed the oversized vent tube. Replaced it with a scale sized version made from a paperclip and sliced insulation from small dia wire.

A gloss coat in prep for the Micro-Mart resin rivet decals - and let that dry.

Last edited on Tue Apr 22nd, 2014 11:10 pm by eTraxx

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 Posted: Tue Apr 22nd, 2014 10:42 pm
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Applied Micro-Mark HO rivets. These are resin decals much like those from Archer Surface Details.

Why HO? Rivets are not O or HO .. but big and smaller. In general I think that these are size appropriate say for bridges.

Anyway .. first coat of some Terra Cotta paint in preparation for weathering etc. The paint – American Accents Terra Cotta has a slight texture that resembles a rust texture. The bolts around the manhole cover are Tichy.

Note: There was a slight bit of movement of the cardstock. If I were to do this again I think I would take the time to seal it with some coats of lacquer. The other thing is the double row of rivets .. much too close together .. another of those ‘lessons learned’.

Last edited on Tue Apr 22nd, 2014 11:11 pm by eTraxx

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 Posted: Tue Apr 22nd, 2014 10:43 pm
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Applied Burnt Umber Gouache. Point – this was a lot darker under the room lights. When I moved it to the layout for this photo the brown is a lot more washed out – at least in the photo. The layout lights are Sylvania ‘Daylight Deluxe’ and a lot brighter. That’s just a caution that you need to look at the paint under the lighting that the model will be displayed in.

Looking at the tank with my eyes instead of the camera it’s not so washed out as the camera shows. I think that the lighter Terra Cotta just is reflecting more light then the brown. It still needs to be darkened a bit .. and will do that ‘in situ’ to ensure that I’m happy with the results.

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 Posted: Tue Apr 22nd, 2014 10:44 pm
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Rust and Oil … with oil paints that is. I used Burnt Sienna and Lamp Black. Not because they are the perfect colors .. but because that is all I have in those shades. I picked up a set of 10 tubes of cheap oil paint at Walmart .. which work great for this kind of thing. I thinned with turpenoid as needed.

Leaning against the tank are the bents. I need to add nbw while they are loose .. trying to add them after you assemble the structure will drive you nuts. (ok. Short trip for me ..)

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 Posted: Tue Apr 22nd, 2014 10:46 pm
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The idea is to get the surface to look rusty .. which means different shades of orange to brown to black .. and at the same time the surface has been stained over the years by spilled oil.

This won’t be the main surface showing though.

This will be an ‘undercoat’. Once the oil dried .. as thin as this it took overnight is all .. I sealed the surface with a matt spray. Once that dried I sprayed on hairspray. This acts as a water soluble resist. That means that I could cover the tank with the ‘tank color’ .. and then use a brush and water to dissolve and tear and peel away that paint to reveal the rusted surface underneath.

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 Posted: Tue Apr 22nd, 2014 10:48 pm
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The next morning after letting the thin oil wash dry overnight I sealed the surface with some matt spray (Modge Podge Matt Clear Acrylic Sealer – from Walmart of all places). When that had dried I sprayed on a couple coats of TRESemmé hairspray and let that dry. Finally I sprayed the paint. I used my favorite industrial color .. Testor Model Master ‘Pale Green’ Acrylic.

Whatever paint you use it helps that it’s water-based since the next step will be to selectively remove it using water. The idea is to dissolve the underlying hairspray so the surface paint can be flaked and worried away. To get under the paint you 'worry' the surface with brushes, toothpicks etc. .. that might be 'doable' with solvent based paints .. but I haven't used those for this.

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 Posted: Tue Apr 22nd, 2014 10:49 pm
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Chipping - Spent a bit chipping the paint. This involves wetting the surface and then poking at the softened paint with a toothpick and various brushes. Think this about right (or .. about as right as I am going to get). I let this dry. The next step will be using some rusty weathering powder across the top .. that should help to bend the paint and rusty bits together.

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 Posted: Tue Apr 22nd, 2014 10:50 pm
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Weathering Powders - Felt that the chipping had left the contrast between the paint and rusty/chipped areas too stark. Rust and weathering is more subtle then that. I used Doc O’Brian’s weathering powders in various reds, browns and black to help blend everything together. Think .. that I need to stop for now. I can always add more weathering but it’s not that easy to ‘un-weather’ the thing.

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 Posted: Tue Apr 22nd, 2014 10:51 pm
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This is after some thin oil washes.

I mostly used a brown from a set of cheap oils I picked up at Walmart thinned greatly with Turpenoid. What I like about using the oils is that you can layer on very thin tints of color. Oils thinned like this dry really quickly so you can build the colors up.

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