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3 way stub switch
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 Posted: Sun May 11th, 2014 01:48 pm
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pipopak
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Now imagine the looks if you show up with a model of it at a NMRA convention (do not forget TONS of reference materials). Jose.



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 Posted: Mon May 12th, 2014 05:04 am
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Alwin
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If they think that is weird, then don't come up with this:



Just a flat car with some loco parts on it.

Alwin

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 Posted: Mon May 12th, 2014 05:52 am
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Helmut
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The first pole road steamer in this thread, I guess. Now, could someone enlighten me - was there ever something like a turnout on a pole road?



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 Posted: Mon May 12th, 2014 02:30 pm
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Alwin
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Helmut,

Sorry for getting off-topic. I don't have a exact answer to you're question but here you can find more info on poleroad track building:

http://bartoliniville.us/scrr/poleroads/Byrant1913.pdf

If someone has a answer for you, I like to know it too.

Alwin

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 Posted: Tue May 13th, 2014 11:21 am
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Herb Kephart
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Hallo Helmut.

Last time that the pole road topic came up here, I said that as far as I could see, there was no way to have a switch. Someone wrote that it could be done with a "kick switch" where a single point, with a pivot at the spot where the frog would be, would work. I let the subject drop--rather than going into a long argument that I had no appetite  for at that time.

I know that you understand the logistics that would make this impossible. Others apparently don't. As I see it, they are--1- The poles cannot be sharpened to a wedge shape (like a standard steel rail point) because of the shape of the stock rail that they would have to nest against. Even with the "point" shaped that way the first couple loaded wheels over it would destroy it.   2  There would have to be a sizable gap in each stock rail to let the wheel on the opposite to the point side leave the stock rail. 3 The point problem could be overcome by making a "stub" switch, with both "rails" coming into the switch hinged---but then you need a frog--which takes you back to reason number 2.

The problem comes not from the fact that the rails are wood, but that the wheels effectively have a flange on both sides.

Anyone have an un-Photoshopped photo of a real one? I don't think so--

The pole roads were undoubtedly single track, back and forth, load one end--unload at the other.

I tried to locate the previous discussion, but the UltraBB search function is just about useless.

Herb



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 Posted: Tue May 13th, 2014 01:27 pm
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W C Greene
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Herbert...I have seen a photo of a pole road switch in an old Abdill book which I will try to find. It appeared that the "siding" or whatever's pole track was laid next to the "main" and when the "train" needed to "switch", the pole rails on the "main" were taken up & lined up with the "siding"...see what I mean? There wasn't a guardrail in sight and no frogs, just crickets and snakes out there in the bush. I assume (ass of you and me) that a "crew" was needed for all this bit of "operation"...(love them ""). If I find this old photo (could be in This Was Railroading), I will post it but I have just changed my avatar again...ain't that enough work?

Beaudreaux



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 Posted: Tue May 13th, 2014 04:42 pm
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Alwin
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In the Narrow gauge & shortline gazette of september/october 1994 is an article "wooden raillines of yesterday".

I don't have it so I have no idea what kind of information is in it.

Alwin

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 Posted: Tue May 27th, 2014 09:03 pm
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Si.
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Hi Alwin.

Nice locie in post #12...

...looks FAST !

I guess the streamliner bodywork was off for maintanence !

TOP PIC. !

Cheers.

Si.



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 Posted: Sat May 31st, 2014 05:42 pm
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Salada
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I cannot add anything useful because, so far as I know, there were never any UK pole roads. The earliest C17th UK colliery tramroads had wooden rails but always had flanged wheels (based, it is said, on earlier German silver mining practice in the Harz Mnts.).

A few (I'm not sure how many) very early English tramroads had iron rails with OUTSIDE flanged wheels; the switches were of course fairly normal looking. I must dig out some photos. Several early tramroads had 'L' shaped rails with flangeless wheels running between them, the switches were relatively conventional.

Regards     Michael

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 Posted: Sat May 31st, 2014 06:48 pm
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tebee
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This 1913 book talks about them having turnouts.

http://bartoliniville.us/scrr/poleroads/Byrant1913.pdf

Tom



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