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Old Modeling Tools & Methods
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 Posted: Wed Aug 13th, 2014 02:03 am
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NevadaBlue
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Lots of good tips guys, thanks!

on the corrugated metal... I use those big throw away oven pans too. Many of them have an embossed pattern. I cut them to size, and roll them flat with a wallpaper roller. It works great. Then corrugate in one of the scrapbooking tools. The original embossed pattern leaves a look like galvanized siding.

I've had good success making the rolled sheets by gently working them over a tin can. No kinks, just go slow.



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 Posted: Wed Aug 13th, 2014 11:13 am
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Bernd
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Jose' you are just a walking information source. :thumb: 

Bernd

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 Posted: Wed Aug 13th, 2014 12:56 pm
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mabloodhound
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As mentioned earlier, those ribs appear to be square, not half rounded.   It would be easy to use Evergreen styrene to form the roof and then glue the square styrene ribs on to that.   Or you can also get half round styrene rod.
Or make the styrene as a master and form the light aluminum over that.   Or...use the styrene as a master to make a mold and then pour it in resin.
:cool:



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D&G RR (Dunstead & Granford) in On30
“All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.” ~ Thos. Jefferson
“Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not.” ~ me
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 Posted: Wed Aug 13th, 2014 02:55 pm
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pipopak
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Bernd wrote: Jose' you are just a walking information source. :thumb: 

Bernd
(Sigh) Unfortunately:
1) I did not find a way to even get part of all that money spent on hobbies back
and 2) proves that I have been foolin' with tools and what not for half a century.
Jose.



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 Posted: Wed Aug 13th, 2014 06:42 pm
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Mr Stumpy
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How about using the "punch outs" from a common paper punch for modeling? I use card stock (3x5" file cards) for all kinds of stuff.

In larger scales try a punch out with a square of flat strip wood or balsa on top to make the nut and washer for the ends of truss rod cars. Can't find a brake wheel for HO cars? use a punch out painted to match the car and draw on "spokes" with a fine tip pen.

On O ands S gauge steam locos, I've used them for sand dome hatches, clean out plugs on boilers, and number plates on the smoke box front. They can also be used for gauges in the cab, depending on scale or stack plugs for industrial locos.

They can also be "stacked" to make tank caps for small fuel tanks. These same "stacks" of punch outs can be wheels for baggage carts or the wheels on small autos. I've even used stacks of punch outs to represent the air cleaners that stick up through the hoods of HO dirt track Stock Cars in slot car racing.

I've "de-Hot Wheel-ized" toy cars (it seems that ALL toy cars have mag wheels these days for some reason) in different scales by making hubcaps for O and S sized cars. In smaller scales they make good full wheel covers. They're just right for headlights and tail lights for G scale autos.

Use them to make "hat brims" for O scale figures. File the "hair" smooth, drill a head sized hole in the punch out and glue it on the figure's head and he has a hat. You can curl the edges to make the hat "cowboy" style, or use just part of the punch out for a "ball cap" style.

Use them for yard signs glued to a toothpick. Track numbers, blue markers for men working on track or rolling stock, and so on.

Like any other common or cheap item most folks overlook, it just takes imagination to see alternate uses for everyday items. When you explain how you used some of these things, newer hobbyists are amazed and consider you a genius for thinking this stuff up!;)

Oh, and but the way, I don't think many of us will ever recoup the money we've spent in the hobby, but I sure had fun!

Stumpy in Ahia:old dude:

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 Posted: Wed Aug 13th, 2014 09:30 pm
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scsshaggy
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The punches are not all 1/4", either. I have an 1/8" punch that I have used to make wheels for HO hand trucks. Just punch thicker cardboard, drill the hubs for small wire axles and glue the wheels on the axles. Then, glue the axles to the hand truck.

As for the hand truck, I drew a design on paper and kept copying with reduction until I had the right size. Then, I cut out the hand truck with a #11 blade, folded it to shape and painted it with enamel paint. The paint makes it surprisingly strong. In the picture of the hand truck, note also the millstone. On the subject of old materials and techniques, it's a crinoid fossil.

Attachment: 003.JPG (Downloaded 40 times)

Last edited on Wed Aug 13th, 2014 09:31 pm by scsshaggy



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 Posted: Wed Aug 13th, 2014 10:35 pm
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pipopak
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Who else remembers doing tree leaves out of IBM computer cards punch-outs?. Jose.



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 Posted: Wed Aug 13th, 2014 10:37 pm
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pipopak
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Oh, and but the way, I don't think many of us will ever recoup the money we've spent in the hobby, but I sure had fun!

Stumpy in Ahia:old dude:
With all the hobby expenses most of us didn't have any change left for smoking, drinking or a mistress. Surely we were/are model citizens!. Jose.



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 Posted: Thu Aug 14th, 2014 08:48 pm
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Mr Stumpy
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You're right, Jose! But when it comes to chasing wild women, I can't catch them anyway these days!:shocked:

Stumpy in Ahia:old dude:

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 Posted: Fri Aug 15th, 2014 02:01 am
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Tony M
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Hi I came across a fiskar's paper crimper that can be used to make corrugated roofing.

Of course it boils down bending corrugated roofing where it doesn't squash is the hard part, coming down to building a water tank in HO scale and the same with the auto car carrier roof.





Does anyone know the best way to model dirt roads.

Tony

Last edited on Fri Feb 20th, 2015 09:53 am by Tony M

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