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Dremel gives high-tech tools a spin with $999 3D printer
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 Posted: Tue Dec 30th, 2014 08:29 pm
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Tramcar Trev
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20" blades are going to need a "commercial" 3d printer and that is going to cost. If I were doing it I would carve a blade from timber, fill the grain, get it nice and smooth and make either rubber (latex with plaster backing) or plaster impressions and then lay each side of the blade up in fibreglass and trim, sand and glue together.... They would all be identical and cheaper than getting them printed.



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 Posted: Tue Dec 30th, 2014 10:52 pm
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pipopak
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Check the RC planes section at your hobby shop, you may be able to use something as a starter. Or do it in sections on a regular 3D printer.  Jose.



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 Posted: Thu Jan 1st, 2015 12:17 am
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Tony M
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Hi Trev, that is how they build the real blade with fibre glass and heat glue them together.
Have been thinking of building the blades out of fibre glass, then there is the fumes, I suffer with asthma.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iY0oBGo0-W4

What about cardboard, how well will it go moulding it.

Was a quiet new year, everyone must of been at the council fire works display in Ipswich, not many parties around our area either.

Was very humid today, storm predicted for this afternoon, I spend the morning putting a boltless 5 shelf storage unit in my tool room.

Tony.

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 Posted: Thu Jan 1st, 2015 12:33 am
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Tramcar Trev
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Cardboard I dont think is the ideal medium.... If you had a mould maybe you could try Papier mache? Or go with fibreglass and use a decent mask with a fume filter on it, I have to use a mask when I work with it and the cartridges that painters use seem quite adequate.



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There once was a man who said Damn!!
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in predestinate groves
I'm not a Bus, I'm a tram
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 Posted: Thu Jan 1st, 2015 07:35 am
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Tony M
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Hi Trev, I am thinking the wire fly screen you can get and shape it to the shape and either then give a few coats of thick paint.:!:may give that a go, will have to make sure it isn't too heavy.

Or use that for a mould, I have a pretty good mask I use for woodturning, not a mask like you are using, has a small filter, you can replace.

Tony.

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 Posted: Thu Jan 1st, 2015 08:37 am
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Paglesham
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Tony,
just carve up a bit of decent timber. Lime (basswood) or even a bit of mahogany. Fill the grain and away you go. Failing that make it up to basic shape in Milliput, then carve back to final shape. If you need more then obviously you'll need some silicon rubber, but it doesn't smell, nor does polyurethane resin. Polyester DOES stink a bit, but is cheaper. Not recommended for casting though. Poor surface finish. One last idea...carve the pattern in two halves, lengthwise, then vac-form and glue together. Strong AND light and cheaply repeatable. My lad could vac them for you with the 737 fuse. sections.

Don't be tempted down the fashion of the month 3D printing route. I can't think of anything less suitable to 3D print. It will be a complete mess of ugly lines in a material you cant easily clean up. It will be ridiculously expensive and ruinously so, if you ask for high resolution. Trust me, I know this stuff.
SLS will give a better result, but still expensive and who's going to draw it all up in CAD, at what cost.?


Cheers,
Martin

Last edited on Thu Jan 1st, 2015 08:43 am by Paglesham



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 Posted: Thu Jan 1st, 2015 05:37 pm
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Tramcar Trev
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Paglesham wrote: Tony,
just carve up a bit of decent timber. Lime (basswood) or even a bit of mahogany. Fill the grain and away you go. Failing that make it up to basic shape in Milliput, then carve back to final shape. If you need more then obviously you'll need some silicon rubber, but it doesn't smell, nor does polyurethane resin. Polyester DOES stink a bit, but is cheaper. Not recommended for casting though. Poor surface finish. One last idea...carve the pattern in two halves, lengthwise, then vac-form and glue together. Strong AND light and cheaply repeatable. My lad could vac them for you with the 737 fuse. sections.

Don't be tempted down the fashion of the month 3D printing route. I can't think of anything less suitable to 3D print. It will be a complete mess of ugly lines in a material you cant easily clean up. It will be ridiculously expensive and ruinously so, if you ask for high resolution. Trust me, I know this stuff.
SLS will give a better result, but still expensive and who's going to draw it all up in CAD, at what cost.?


Cheers,
Martin
Yes make up a master and then make copies especially if you want more than one is the way to go.... to get two halves glue 2 pieces of timber together with some thickish paper in the joint and make the base end a bit longer. When you have carved it a chisel will split it into 2 halves along the paper joint, then make up a latex ( its cheap) mould and back that with plaster..... We should all wear at least a dust mask when working with timber and fibreglass its as bad as smoking...



____________________
There once was a man who said Damn!!
I perceive with regret that I am
A creature that moves
in predestinate groves
I'm not a Bus, I'm a tram
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 Posted: Fri Jan 2nd, 2015 04:23 pm
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Tony M
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HI Trev, I am into woodturning and could the general shape of the blade but not the high area, hare are a couple of pics of a RTR Herpa HO scale model blade, not long enough





Would be the way to go but is pretty expensive $30 a blade, the whole model cost $250+, 28 inch blade span 30 inches high. Be ok on flat wagons but I am using spine cars and that is why they have to be 20 inches long for.

I have another project on the drawing board, turning the shells of the modern tank cars, got my own wood lathe.

Going to my train club today to run my Flying Scot on its madden run with duel tender drive tenders, one is a water tender, both motors are 5poles, pull 16+ coaches.

Tony :2t::glad::apl:

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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2017 01:02 am
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Alan G
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Regarding the original post Id welcome Dremel giving MakerBot some competition. MakerBot makes some of the best if your in need of hi resolution. For modeling stereolithography (SLA) technology might be the way to go it can print in higher resolution but you have to work with a few smelly chemicals during the curing process.

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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2017 11:50 pm
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Tony M
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Hi Alan, How I would love t own a 3/D printer, come in hany when printing detail parts,my brother-in-law has one have asked him if he would print the pedastools for the fancy fencing for Sydney Central Station I am modelling need heaps of them.I took the pic when I visited Sydney last October, only had a few hours, planning to go bck this year in the cooler months, visited Canberra passing htrough going to the the airport.

Tony

Attachment: IMG_0837 A.jpg (Downloaded 20 times)

Last edited on Mon Jan 9th, 2017 11:51 pm by Tony M

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