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Helmut
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Gents,
having been constantly provoked by U.B.'s machinations I also decided to leave TT scale for the winter months and have something wee bit more substantial in my garden. So here you can see my son operating my battery-driven model of a ubiquitious ( at least up to the '60s ) German contractor's diesel in a makeshift fashion, because the high-tech motor controller just had quit a while before due to an inadvertent short. the kids had fun anyway.

Attachment: Dresden_3.jpg (Downloaded 347 times)

Salada
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Helmut :  That looks like good fun - just proves that anything goes in NG !.
Were YOU allowed to drive ?.

Regards                      Michael

Helmut
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@Michael
Not really, the girls took a turn also. The picture shows how loco looks when the hood is attached.

Attachment: Bild 001.jpg (Downloaded 329 times)

Herb Kephart
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Helmut

The rail looks to be 60mm channel??

Herb

Ray Dunakin
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Cool!

Helmut
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@Herb
The rails are 40mm channel. A large stretch will also be made of 30mm. A friend's large layout on his premises ( he owns a metalworking business and uses it for in-house transport ) is made of this, too. It stands up well. I thought about using 5 or 7kg/m rail, but the costs were too high. Rails can be found stacked after having been pulled out of their second life as garden fenceposts in a nearby ex-mining village, but once people got the word prices started to soar. A decent rail bender for that size is also somewhat demanding to build. Finally a 10' track segment cannot be handled by one man alone so easily.

Helmut
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here's a view of the control panel.

Attachment: Diema-DL8_Bedienseite_2.jpg (Downloaded 300 times)

Helmut
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last weekend grading and track building went on:

Attachment: Bau301114_6a.jpg (Downloaded 275 times)

Helmut
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Oh well, there are other photos:


Sods and soil had to be moved to the upper stretches of the garden, my version of a road-railer.



A sparks brigadier at work. It was only 36°F, so even I left the beer for hot tea!





Some switching on  plain and grade, before the Chinese-made motor electronics quit again. Buy cheap and thus buy twice. Now I've ordered one from 4QD in GB. Curtis' would have taken too long to deliver.

dwyaneward
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Cool project, Helmut :2t:

Salada
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Hello Helmut,

I like the inset rails across the brick pavior path - on a curve too !. Very neat.
No crossing barriers/warning lights though ?.

Regards,                 Michael

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@Michael
There will be a warning sign later on - for unaware freerailers, of course.

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And a really loud crossing bell to please the neighbours ??.

Regards,              Michael

Helmut
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@all
4QD's controller arrived just in time ( Dec 5th ) as a nice Santa Claus present ( In Germany, S.C. will either leave presents in shoes put out in the evening or appear in person on the eve of  Dec 6th ) for me. It was put in and I was able ( after some negotiations with my son ) to drive up and down the hill without any sweat. That GBP 251,50 were well spent, indeed! Loads were rather hefty- 200kgs on a 'lowry', thanks to the built-in regenerative brake it held set speed downhill, no runaway nor need for a mech brake. Fellas, that's what I call "fit for the job"

Helmut
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Sunday we visited one of the now ubiquitous "Xmas-Marketplaces" they set up everywhere. This one was particularly nice as a 5" gauge oval with a real steam loco to pull the kids around, was set up. Watching this for some moments, my wife asked: "What would it be if we had one on our line?" Now, Michael, if that materializes, whistle and bell plus exhaust would please the neighbours all day, if necessary. As their clothesline is close to the tracks, the washing would also pick up a nice aroma...:glad:

Helmut
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Oh, lest I forget - action!!!!
@Bernd
here's some spoken German for you:bg:

Lee B
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Amazing, love what you have done so far! glad: I had the option to buy a 15-inch gauge mining locomotive with a truck engine and chain drive, a few years ago. I have about 1/5 acres on the property and the majority of that is totally flat and devoid of trees. I seriously contemplated building something like this but with wider track for a short while.
That is, until my wife made it clear that I'd have to do the work on the RR as I could afford each piece and that I'd also have to sell my WW2 Jeep and a great deal of my WW2 collection as well.
Needless to say, I passed on that offer. That would have been a 20-30 project before any trains would have run, the way my wife was describing it and I'm not even remotely that patient.

Wow, it's right alongside a sidewalk and street? You are going to have people and cars stopped to watch the train from time to time once it's running! :2t:

Last edited on Thu Dec 11th, 2014 10:17 pm by Lee B

Helmut
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Hi all,
not that you think I've been lazy during the past months. The bridge deck has been covered entirely with planking, and the plans for the run into the garage-cum-shed have been finalized.  As I did not want to cut grooves into the yard's pavement, I pondered over the possible ways to have the rails fastened to it. Here's what I came up with:

Attachment: Einfahrt_6.gif (Downloaded 85 times)

Helmut
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OK, here's the progress so far before the rain came down today.

Attachment: Einfahrt_7.gif (Downloaded 70 times)

Helmut
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Hi all,
I have another issue that IMHO is very important when operating in such a dimension. In the smaller scales over here, you get away without compensating the chassis of a two-axle vehicle, as the flange depth will provide sufficient vertical play ( in case you don't overdo it ) to keep the effects of the unavoidable sags and humps in your track at bay. But the great outdoors is a different kettle of fish altogether. At a flange depth of 5/16" ( The standard for 10.25" gauge ) any axle distance of more than 16" on a rigid chassis will give you trouble,when the car is running light. Were it loaded, it would keep the track better.
For testing a way of semi-compensation, I made up a wooden frame vehicle with the axles spaced 24" apart. This is , taking into consideration wheel diameter ( 5"), gauge ( 9 7/16...9 5/8") and minimum radius ( 14' 9" ) the widest reasonably applicable distance.
Just for kicks I tried a rigid chassis first and I sent it light down the hill into the curve at the foot. It jumped the rails halfway in the bend. Nice crash indeed.
I did not want to use springs, so I came across rubber dampers. I had shelved some of these anyway, so I put them under one axle of the contraption.
See attached pictures:


here' the underside, the elastic mount is on the right-hand side:


And finally the mounting of the dampers:



Doing the same test again, it really hugged the rails and sped round the bend you can see in my previous post. I ha dnot then taken the garbage cans away, and it bumped right into them. Yours truly decided to go for a ride himself, precariously clinging to that narrow board and daring only to start from half the hill.  Speedy enough it was, and no harms were reported in the end.

Shoulders
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Interesting.

How did you fix the tack down on the paved slabs?

Cheers Dan

Helmut
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The tracks are made from 15mm sq. rods. I drilled 8,5mm holes down from the top and had them countersunk to accommodate flathead screws. A standard plug for a 6mm screw is 8mm in diameter, so I could use the pre-drilled holes as a guide for the hammer-drill. The rails were fixed with a jig so that the holes could be brought down precisely. Then I pushed the plugs through the rails into the concrete and fastened the screws. Very fast method and the trackwork is rather sturdy. In bends you have to drill every 12" to 16", at least in the outer rail in order to avoid widening of the gauge resulting from the lateral forces a loco is exerting when going round.

Last edited on Tue Aug 4th, 2015 05:45 pm by Helmut

Shoulders
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WOW, really that simple- if it work then why not. I did wonder cause I thought if you had have used wall fixings these need a larger diameter which would have made alignment harder or anchor bolts which use the same diameter hole as the thread size which would be easier but then there was the hammering in and the expansion of both which my cause the slabs to blow.

I like your idea and looks very neat. I presume the screws are stainless:bg:

All the beast cheers Dan

Helmut
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Well,
after all that tracklaying I think it's time to reveal the reason for all that hurrying:


The one in the background carrying the flue on the smokestack. My good friend's son approached me in February and told me he'd like to choose designing and buildinga steam locomotive for his bachelor in mech. engineering's thesis. Whether I would like one? Oh, the price, I said but he made an offer I couldn't refuse ( still some dinero, but...)
Now, in August, it arrived and took the tracks under its own steam going up a 6.5% grade with the builder at the throttle:


In the upper reaches of the garden we had put down a rather hodge-podge temporary track with  grades up to 10%, but it made it all the way up:


My friend, a Bundesbahn loco driving instructor, watches closely of course...

All yours with a head full of steam -

Alwin
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Hey Helmut,

That steam loco is very cool! And I see you don't have to wheater it anymore. :bg:
Have fun with it.

Alwin

Herb Kephart
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Great addition Helmut. I wrote addiction first by mistake--but it might just turn into that!

Herb

Helmut
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@Herb
addiction - it always was that for me, being an Festiniog Rwy ex-fireman and auxiliary driver ( volunteer )

Helmut
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If somebody likes to watch the trial runs on a friend's 10.25" layout  ( Yes, the loco's gauge can be adjusted ) here it is.

Last edited on Sun Aug 16th, 2015 08:52 pm by Helmut

Herb Kephart
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Nice! You can save steam by not running with the cylinder cocks open so long--only have to get the cylinders up to a temperature where the steam won't condense in them you know.

Next it would be nice to see one of those old Deutz 4 wheelers, with a horizontal I cylinder diesel--and big flywheels visible through open hood doors.

Herb

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@Herb
These were trial runs, e. g. note the different steam dome. They changed some things 'on the fly' there as the workshop is well-equipped ( makes me jealous at times ) The drain cocks now release only a rather small amount of steam, but is has been found that the counter-pressure which inevitably builds up when the valve cuts off and the piston compresses the remaining steam just before the end of its travel, is much less. So overall operation is smoother than with completely closed cocks. When starting from a pause, you have to open the cocks anyway.

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Valve gear is allowing steam admission too soon?

Herb

Helmut
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Not at all. There's always a small piston travel against a closed port: see here. On this site you can also check the PV diagram to see that there's always back pressure impeding the motion.

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True--And I am aware of this. But if you get smoother running with the cocks open, it sounds like you have too much compression---or too much steam admitted the cylinder before the piston comes to top dead center at low speed.

Herb

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Wow, that little steam loco is a beauty! Too cool!

Helmut
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@Herb
I just now noted that on the trials, the drain cocks were open wide. Now that has been corrected, only a faint bleed is present during normal operation. They told me they then had not found a proper seal for the drain cocks and had left them open.

And sure I hope your second modelling life will be rewarding. Thank you for all that enthusiasm and effort you've put into this forum.

@all
My 12-yr old very reluctantly allows me to operate the throttle - in true arrogant engineer fashion he relegates me almost exclusively to the shed fireman's tasks of firing it up and cleaning out the soot.

Last edited on Wed Sep 9th, 2015 07:19 pm by Helmut

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Hi Helmut.

Yep ! ... LARGE SCALE !!!

Dunno how I missed this thread...
...but just caught up on it !

Looks like a great way to 'play trains' !

Clever track solutions.

All the best.

Cheers.

Si.

:moose:

Helmut
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Hi all,
I think it's time to update upon my activities. As you may know, the upper reaches of the garden have not yet been accessed by a permanent rail connection. So today a firm went in to do  the necessary digging and shovelling to prepare the ground for tracklaying. The container for the excavated soil could only be placed in the lower front next to the existing tracks. There's a distance of some 300' to be covered, all along the track that is already there. Normally they would have used a small caterpillar dumper, but it would have ruined the track. So I decided to make good use of the infrastructure and within 2 days, I sort of quick-and-dirty built a front-dump truck of the same capacity to roll along the rails. Providing access to the immediate worksite by rail proved to be some challenge, but I succeeded in doing so. See what it looks like:

That's the brakeable chassis I started with ( very important on a 6.5% grade! )

As I said, quick and dirty frame.

Married to the chassis.

The dumper in all its glory, takes four whellbarrow-fulls.

The rear side openes before..

you dump the whole contents.

Container access.

A moveable turntable to get the dumper from the main line to the container track.

It turns out like that..

And up to the destination.
Sorry, there's no load to show in the photos, was too busy getting all that stuff into the container.
Lo and behold, that contraption is bobbing!

Last edited on Mon Oct 5th, 2015 07:19 pm by Helmut

Si.
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Hi Helmut.

Nice dumper wagon !

Bond-baddie Christopher Walken was excavating with similar kit.

A plan to bring Brussels to it's knees (I hope).

All the best.

Cheers.

Si.

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Hi all,
as it was too cumbersome to shovel all that dirt form the front into the back of the container, I devised a hydraulic lift in order to dump directly from top into it. Also I want to show you some photo of the lumber-tram-like operations during the excavations.

The track into the upper garden. You can see clearly where the temporary tracks are placed on the soil.

Upper end. One of the contractor's workers busy at filling the dumper.

The other one ( the daring type ) trundling downhill with a full load, some 250..350kg depending on how high the other filled it up. The brake lever is essential in this type of gravity operation!

The temporary ramp with climbing track. Once the guy came round the bend ( I feared he'd derail ) with such a speed that he rattled all the way up to the stop! Well, those people from the woods of Bulgaria have a different approach to safety sometimes...
A hydraulic hoist was put to good use.

before one could dump, some of the dirt had to be pushed out by shovel, as you have to lift the whole container which is hinged in front.

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I take my hat off to you and your son, Helmut.
Quite an ingenious number of work saving adaptations. Being the lazy type, I think I would have opted for the lawn taking a beating, however..

Herb

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Truly brilliant work! Did you make the portable turntable, too?

Helmut
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@Ray
No. That friend with the metalworking firm devised a portable system years ago and made all the necessary gadgets you need to operate it properly. So I am the lucky one who can always rely on his friend's almost endless stocks of equipment.
That interoperability also is the reason why I did not choose 10 1/4" but 9 7/16" gauge. Interesting enough, in the 60's there was a large operation with 2inch-scale models open for the public using the same gauge in the US. Read here.

Last edited on Sun Oct 11th, 2015 10:42 am by Helmut

Helmut
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It turned out that I still have no switches. In order to mend the situation, some good ( and thirsty ) friends came to my rescue. here's what we achieved:

An example of a well-organized workspace:


Two in place on saturday, 19:30Hrs CEST


Sunday saw some driving on remote and strange grounds, we had the locos transferred to my friend's firm premises:


Somehow no one takes a photo of me at the throttle:bang:

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Top job Helmut !. I've somehow overlooked your thread since your summertime posts.

Very elegant solution to fixing the track across the yard - running rail & hole drilling template at the same time, clever.

The need to run with cylinder drain cocks partially open : Looks like a flat slide valve from the loco photos ? :-

Is the valve body lifting off the cylinder port face slightly ?

Is the valve body face absolutely true ?

Is the admission lead/lag calculation & position of cylinder ports slightly wrong ?

Some "steam cushion"/cylinder back-pressure is necessary.

Have you tried temporarily fitting a valve manifold recording pressure gauge ? (your friends seem very well equipped, might have one ?).

I'm impressed that a B.Sc. Mech Eng undergrad actually has to MAKE something - they mostly seem to be 'paper theory &/or computer user only' graduates over here.

Regards,             Michael

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Perhaps I missed it, but what fuel does that thing burn?

How much maintenance does a small loco like that require?

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After the turnouts had been in place for some time, two drawbacks showed up:
1. The parallel track clearance was much too small - two flatcars carrying a standard pallet each must be able to pass one another.
2. That notched curved tongue did not divert the flange enough to keep it from climbing up. This led to derailments.

So I took them out again and welded on some wedges, which completely solved the problem:


P.1 Wedge on the curved tongue



P.2. Now the flange is gliding along smoothly.

Plus, I had not yet a decent method to keep the switchblades in position. I did not want levers or ground-throws there, as this is a frequently used area ( The compost bin is just there and will be served by a siding anyway ). I devised a lock-pin method to keep them in place:



P.3. This channel is welded underneath the tie-bar . Keeps it free from dirt and moisture.



P.4. The assembly in plce before drilling the holes.



P.5. Locked in straight postion



P.6. Locked in branching position.

The notch on the straight tongue does not interfere with operations and is giving no trouble at all.

Finally, the corrected track alignment:


Last edited on Wed May 25th, 2016 02:06 pm by Helmut

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To answer some of the questions:

The loco burns athracite coal briquets about the size of an egg.
Maintenance is the same as for the big ones:
Clean out the flues, shake the grates, remove cinders and ashes from the smokebox, oil round before each trip, keep your cylinder oil pump well filled, blow down the boiler properly after each session, and last but not least  watch that gauge glass!

Si.
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" The loco burns athracite coal briquets about the size of an egg."

Hi Helmut.

Is that more, or less, pollution per kilometer than a V.W. ?

:moose:

Si.

Sparrow or ostrich ?

Helmut
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@Si
much less, and my run is only some 400'
BTW, did anyone consider the amount of detrimental exhaust generated by our beloved lorries/trucks?

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Switches look almost identical to the ones that I made for our 7½ gauge line (when we had one) except that I didn't have to make the points (tongues) so sharp--but that might have been a factor of the flange contour (SMEE std) and the fact that the rail was rectangular bar, set on edge.

I like the pin locking the points, simple, and positive. Well done! I owe you a beer!

Sooner or later, someone is going to ask how you are going to insulate the steel ties so that they don't short the two rail power <G>


Herb

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Hi Helmut

How do you insulate the steel ties so that they don't short the two rail power ? ;)

How's it going ?

Got any new HOT pix. from the summer there ??

:moose:

Si.

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@Si

Sorry, no hot pix.

I've been busy making another passenger-carrying wagon,
more on that in appropriate time.

The loco's side tanks needed to be painted waterproof on the inside.
Too much goo builds up if you leave it as it was.

Then there is some grading to do for the compost bin siding,
haven't put that in yet.


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It's been a long time since I wrote about my garden RR.

A few weeks ago I finally took the guts to build that turntable segment,
to complete the runaround in the upper station.

Here's the earthworks:





Starting with concrete facts:





All the ingredients came by rail:





Now that the the pit was ready complete with gully,
I called my trusty friends to help me with the steel.

I had the parts pre-cut to order,
which is easy when you do a proper CAD drawing and parts' list beforehand.





The bridge's positioning had to be fitted to the pit's dimensions,
especially to fulfill height, clearance, and rail alignment requirements.

It's a demanding task.





In the end, everything fitted as intended and calculated.





Now the access roads are ready, too.

A slight deviation is due to the switch's frog angle differing from the swing angle.
Such a small 'misalignment' can be tolerated, however.





And now the final test:  Does the steam loco fit?

A solid bufferstop on the far end is absolutely necessary,
if you do not want to try salvaging a loco from the pit.

As you can see, it fits even with the bufferstop being directly mounted to the far end.





The turntable was built and put in place commencing Friday 15:00h and ending Sunday 11:00h.

A total of 36 bottles of beer, two full rounds of barbecue, salads and side dishes,
not to mention the mineral water (as the temperatures were increasing per day),
completed the list of materials.


Tom Ward
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Helmut - this is very cool! 

This was my first time through this thread and I totally enjoyed it.
 

Your projects are all first rate, very well done. 

The turntable turned out great too.  Really clever. 

I especially like the steam loco.  Beautiful. 


Wish I had the time/resources/space/engineering mind to do something like this.

- Tom


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" A total of 36 bottles of beer, two full rounds of barbecue, salads and side dishes,
not to mention the mineral water (as the temperatures were increasing per day) "


Hi Helmut  :wave:



I guess the last train, Sunday night 'recycling special', destination to the bottle-bank ...  ;)

... must have made a fairly loud & satisfying 'clinking' noise !  [toast]  [toast]


:P


Congrats. to the weekend work-crew, on a job well done ...  :thumb:

... I'm 'sticking' to 1:35n2 & my 'MEK welder' for now though !  :boogie:



:dt: :dt: :moose: :dt: :dt:



Si.


Helmut
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I still do not come round to build that passenger-car.

Meanwhile, my Turkish mother-in-law, aged 89, got stranded at our home.
She cannot return to her beloved Istanbul because of all the restrictions and quarantine requirements,
which in her state needing constant attention now, would be detrimental to say the least.

Stair-climbing is very cumbersome for her, so I decided to make something like a wheelchair on rails.
This enables her to leave and enter the house with less effort.
She now can get out of the automobile onto the car's seat,
and travel all the way up the ramp to her destination winter-garden door,
where she can easily enter the living-room and her quarters.

My task was to make something easily accessible for elderly people, being comfortable and safe.
First I thought about the standard depressed-center bogie car,
but that seat level would have been to low for her to sit and get up,
it is required to have the standard seat height, without need for much turning and straddling.

The solution is to have frontal (rectal to be honest) access to the car,
and sliding back from the entering into the riding position once seated.
All this with proper safety precautions to consider.

After some head-scratching, I remembered an all-wooden truck chassis sitting in the far corner of the garage.
It featured rubber-damper springing for smooth riding and so made it a fine candidate for the job.
Drawing plans is for sissies, real men go at it without hesitation!
Out it came and I developed ideas as I went along.

Starting with this:





First came the footsteps:





Then I thought about some sort of support for the sliding carriage.

A total of four casters under the chair should suffice,
and are available for a song at the DIY store.










Some thin metal sheet to cover the running surface would be fine, too.

The roofing department there provided me with the needed L-profile of 040" stainless sheet.





In my stash I found a pair of ball-bearing equipped drawer supports.
 
These would give me the necessary horizontal and vertical guiding,
when I adjusted them in such a way, that the weight still was taken by the casters.





The chair's legs were cut down to requirement an fastened with screws.

Here shown in the enter/leave position:





And here in the slid-back riding position:





Arm-rests and position-locks, as well as a decent handbrake and proper painting,
remain on the To-Do list.

It all, took me 4 days to build so far.


Type desigantion and number stenciling, has to be done, too.

Think I call it ILT-1 ( In-Law Transporter )  [toast]


pipopak
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Evidence of Rule G violation on the loco hood...

Jose.



Helmut
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This is a contractor's railway bloke!



Nice Guy Eddie
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It's not good Health & Safety practice

The Mother-in-law leaving her empties on the loco


I hope she doesn't just throw her bottle tops down on the ground

They could get between the rail & wheels causing a derailment


The hi-viz seating is very positive though

I hope she wears her orange waistcoat & hard-hat !


[whack]


Eddie


Ken C
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Helmut

Looks like a very suitable solution for a vexing problem,
hopefully thing's will improve in the future.

Steven B
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:bow:    ;)

Bahahahahaha! 

Love it!



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