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Expanded Foamboard For Benchwork Construction
 Moderated by: oztrainz Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  Next Page Last Page  
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 Posted: Sat Nov 15th, 2014 07:52 am
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NathanO
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If you do not feel like building, but buying take a look at:

http://www.kamkonnect.com/

Nathan

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 Posted: Sat Nov 15th, 2014 09:23 am
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pipopak
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Kamconnect surely looks good, but look at the prices!. You can build whole modules just out the price of a pair of legs. No thanks. Jose.



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 Posted: Sat Nov 15th, 2014 10:09 am
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mabloodhound
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The folding tables are a good option and we use the PVC pipe sleeves over the legs to get the higher height for my wife's jewelry shows.   But they can be a bit heavy/awkward, the trade off being is they can be used for other things....like yard sales.
I also like the plastic folding saw horses which I use on the job.   Getting the extra height might be a little bothersome, though I'm sure there is a way.   They are light weight so easy to carry around.
:cool:



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 Posted: Sat Nov 15th, 2014 11:59 am
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mwiz64
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Personally, I think those Kamkonnect tables look like a good value but then, I'm not a retired guy with a bunch of time. I think the time savings and quality are worth their asking price.



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 Posted: Sat Nov 15th, 2014 12:14 pm
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jtrain
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I suppose that Kam Konnect might be best served in a situation where the modeler has no way of building the modules themselves.

Expensive yes, but based on their videos, that's one of the best designs I've seen, pretty snappy. Too bad it doesn't work for mountain layouts, the allen wrench holes would be covered.

You could probably adapt the design and make them yourself with a table saw, circular saw, and a router.

--James:java:



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 Posted: Sat Nov 15th, 2014 01:21 pm
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oztrainz
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Hi all,
You guys are over-engineering it. Kent's spec called for lightweight. You only need to support the module joints so that they are level.

For about $40 out here you can buy a blow-moulded plastic table with fold-up legs of 4' by 2' size. You Use the aluminium-frame to give you the height by building up from a stable support. The blow-mould top has more than enough strength to support light foamcore modules that even with with lighting transformers attached comes in at about 20 lb or 10 kg all up. Foamcore weighs in at 1/5 the weight of 3mm ply for a comparable area.

Or for about the same money you can buy the fold-up legs and make your own top. This was the approach for Yallah.
Remember Yallah was built back in 2005. Things have moved on since then in terms of light weight supports that fold flat to tie up minimal storage space when not in use. Also remember here Kent is in a small loft unit so saving space when stored is going to be a premium for him. Some photos under Yallah:

shows one end of of the plank with one of the indexing blocks. The end module frame timber is to the left of the table leg.


Shows a long view along the plank. The transverse timbers carry the weight of the layout. The aluminium and foamcore is glued to the timber exterior frame. The timber frame is only there to support the folded 1/2 of the layout when stored - see next photo


Photo shows Yallah when stored. The fixed portion is on the right. The left side swings through 180 degrees and is clipped to the fixed part of the layout. The drop-down legs to support the moveable end of this end of the layout are stored between the plank and the transverse members shown in the previous photo.

I hope all this is now clearer than mud - My suggestion is to print out and build Professor Klyzlr's 1/10 scale module in the link that I posted in my previous message. It should help clear up a few things that will take a lot of words to explain.



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 Posted: Sat Nov 15th, 2014 02:25 pm
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Kent K
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To all:

What I'm looking for is info on use of the foam board in lieu of other materials. The long range goal is to make this thing weigh as little as possible while still providing the rigid structure needed. I do anticipate the need for non foam products for things such as legs in order to bring the bench top height up to the what is desired. My concerns are for accurate repeatable alignment between modules and flexibility in adjustment of the height. I will be doing this on a minimal budget, but will spend what is needed to get the job done. I am open to any suggestions, once again I think use of foam board in place of wood products would reduce the overall weight significantly. That is the reason for the original post. Thank you to everyone for your responses.

Kent K



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 Posted: Sat Nov 15th, 2014 03:05 pm
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oztrainz
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Kent K wrote:
To all:

What I'm looking for is info on use of the foam board in lieu of other materials. The long range goal is to make this thing weigh as little as possible while still providing the rigid structure needed. I do anticipate the need for non foam products for things such as legs in order to bring the bench top height up to the what is desired. My concerns are for accurate repeatable alignment between modules and flexibility in adjustment of the height. I will be doing this on a minimal budget, but will spend what is needed to get the job done. I am open to any suggestions, once again I think use of foam board in place of wood products would reduce the overall weight significantly. That is the reason for the original post. Thank you to everyone for your responses.

Kent K

Hi all, the emphasis in the quote is my doing.

For Kent,
some questions if I may?
How much adjustment in height are you looking for and why? The answers to these 2 questions will go along way to helping you not to make too many wrong turns

As for repeatability of set-up - If you can get at least the height tied down so that everything is at the same height every time you set it up the x-y positioning can be done very easily. One of the early UK proponents of foamcore used velcro to hold his table supported modules in the correct position.

Next question:
Are you after a series of flat domino-type module, or a full proscenium module with included lighting or somewhere in between?

Again your answer will help us to offer suitable advice.

My feeling is that perhaps we should have asked these questions as the second post in the topic.

Last edited on Sat Nov 15th, 2014 07:42 pm by oztrainz



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 Posted: Sat Nov 15th, 2014 06:28 pm
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Salada
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Kent,

The 2 layouts that I mentioned are supported loosely on top of separate trestles. Last time I spoke to the chap he had yet to improvise any accurate, permanent "registration" lugs/fingers/whatever - the baseboards were free to slide around. Side to side registration between adjacent boards was by pairs of small ply guides, screwed Left & Right onto the end of one board & that then overlapped the end of the next board. OK as a temporary solution but probably not up to being assembled/disassembled repeatedly. I hope that helps a little.

Regards          Michael

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 Posted: Sat Nov 15th, 2014 07:13 pm
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jtrain
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Kent,

The only design I've ever seen that effectively uses foam materials as the sole material for benchwork is this:

http://www.carendt.com/small-layout-scrapbook/page-97a-may-2010/#chicago

However, there are some problems with this set up:

1. The frame s vulnerable to solvents, certain paints, and heat.

2. The frame is not sturdy enough by itself (at least my standards, everyone has different opinions on this)

3. The material is only strong when the layout modules are small and compact.

The plus side is VERY light weight benchwork.

However, this is my suggestion if you want lightweight benchwork that utilizes foam and cost of materials is not a problem:

Waffle Benchwork:

http://dixiecentralrailroad.blogspot.com/2009/12/benchwork-sections-are-done.html

There was an article in MRR magazine a few years back, but this is the best site I could find on the subject.

As you can see, the sections can be made into curves, straights, or really any shape you want. And yes, they can be cut and remade to include valleys or mountains. Height is all in the legs, you need to have a design worked out that allows you to make minor adjustments (up or down about an inch). The side to side movement of modules just requires accurate cutting for the modules.

Overall, waffle benchwork provides great strength with minimal weight. Foam can be added on top the frame for a scenery base.

--James:java:

Last edited on Sat Nov 15th, 2014 07:51 pm by jtrain



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