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Use of foamboard in benchwork construction
 Moderated by: oztrainz Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  Next Page Last Page  
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 Posted: Sat Nov 15th, 2014 11:09 pm
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Bernd
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Kent,

I understand you seem to be having a problem posting. What is it you don't understand about posting a subject?

Sorry for the off topic here guys, but Kent seems to be having difficulty posting. Just trying to do my Super Moderator duties to keep everybody happy.

Bernd



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 Posted: Sat Nov 15th, 2014 11:32 pm
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Kent K
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Bernd,

I don't have problems with getting things posted. What I was asking is whether or not bench work should be in this forum or one of the others. I didn't see any other logical place to put this.

Kent K



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 Posted: Sun Nov 16th, 2014 12:07 am
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Kent K
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John,

I am looking for moderate adjustments in the height so that moving the modules from one place to another can be accommodated. I have thought about using long machine bolts at the bottom of the legs as a sort of caster. This would allow variations in height. It would seem that I will have to have some plywood at the interface between modules for placing any components which have to mate to one another. I already have 5mm plywood in hand and thicker things also.

My experience with a club layout back in my school days tells me that the traditional L-girder and other sorts of construction makes for a very rigid layout that weighs an awfully lot. Partly this because of the plaster, partly just the weight of the wood itself. I don't really want to build something that I can't move by myself. As I am well past my physical prime, this leads me down the path of rethinking some of these basic things.

I have seen foam board used in some rather large structures with gussets at the interface of two pieces to increase the rigidity. If the foam board could be used in an I beam type of structure, I think it might be able to replace the traditional L-girder. Given that, I could then put sheets of the expanded foam insulation boards on top of that to get the scenery. I have seen references to using foam castings to get rock surfaces and such.

I probably just need to get some of the foam board and do some experiments with it. I know that I don't want something that is going to deteriorate on its own. I just don't want to reinvent the wheel if some other person already has a solution. Some of the other people who posted here have suggestions which I need to explore.

Thank you for your input.

Kent K



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Kent K
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 Posted: Sun Nov 16th, 2014 12:24 am
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oztrainz
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Hi Kent,
I can probably help with links to light-weight rocks as well. I'll dig up some links and photos and post them here as well. I will have some pretty substantial cliffs to do soon and will be using light weight materials to make them

I am looking for some other information on Foamcore modules for you at present. In my previous posts I mentioned a link to a 1/10 scale module the trick is to print it out on A4 with NO SCALING and glue it to some ceral packet cardboard or similar. The process for building a full size module is exactly the same as for the 1/10 module

I'll reply back as soon as I can find the links. This has all been done before and yes I've seen it done. My aim is to make this as painless as possible for you.



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 Posted: Sun Nov 16th, 2014 01:26 am
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Kent K
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John,

I would appreciate that and look forward to the URLs. I will try mocking things up with a couple of cereal cartons that are no longer being used for cereal storage (seems like I need to get to grocers one of these days).

I really didn't think this would have such interest. I thank you and everyone else who has taken the time to enlighten me about their experiences.

Kent K



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 Posted: Sun Nov 16th, 2014 06:22 am
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oztrainz
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Hi Kent and all,
The following photos were taken by me in October 2009 at the bi-annual Aus7mm gathering. The 2 foamcore modules were designed as "show items" for a clinic run by Professor Klyzlr on foamcore modules. These were designed with 2 different alignment methods for the join. As they are in the photos they are the 1250mm long by 300mm deep version and weigh in at under 10lb each. This is the ruggedised version with the aluminium exo-skeleton for exhibition-type use. The aluminium framing is one of the key factors that allows for repeatable alignment at the module joint.

First module

Shows the case lock type fasteners on the front and . The triple-laminated deck for the track has not been glued in.

Right end of the same module, with second module in the background


Detail of case-lock fastener and 3mm-ply or MDF end plate. The end plate protects the end of the foamcore.


Alignment method 1 - split hinges, with pin glued in bottom part of hinge and the upper part of the hinge pin acts as the alignment guide at rear of the module. There is another split hinge below this one. The case-lock secures the front of the module enduring positive repeatable alignment in x-y-z directions at the join.


Alignment method 2 - aluminium "fingers" that interleave the fingers support both sides of the join and control any variation in the z axis. The tight fit between the fingers stops and y variation and the case-locks and the endplates ensure that the x-axis is covered.


I think one of the modules later turned into Chicago Fork
http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/magazine/mrh-2013-09-sep/layout-chicago-fork

I hope that this helps you tie things together.

Now I need some z's. I'll be back with the rock links tomorrow when the sun comes back up.

Last edited on Sun Nov 16th, 2014 06:24 am by oztrainz



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 Posted: Sun Nov 16th, 2014 08:55 am
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Bernd
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Kent K wrote: Bernd,

I don't have problems with getting things posted. What I was asking is whether or not bench work should be in this forum or one of the others. I didn't see any other logical place to put this.

Kent K


Kent,

There is no specific section to post this in. If it had been something that didn't fit in this section we would have moved it. Carry on. Sorry to interrupt.

Bernd



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 Posted: Sun Nov 16th, 2014 10:40 am
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bobquincy
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jtrain wroteWaffle Benchwork:

http://dixiecentralrailroad.blogspot.com/2009/12/benchwork-sections-are-done.html

I looked at foam and waffle/torsion box and the waffle won on strength and weight.

http://www.americanwoodworker.com/blogs/techniques/archive/2013/03/07/how-to-build-a-torsion-box.aspx

http://s-ss3.home.mindspring.com/id1.html

The waffle is a lot more work and requires some precision wood cutting but it is durable.  This will probably be the method I use for a lightweight "take-apart" layout.

boB



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 Posted: Sun Nov 16th, 2014 09:38 pm
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Kent K
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This is along the lines I was thinking, now, however, instead of luan plywood use 5mm foam board for the structural members except at the ends where two modules will interface. On these place door hinges at the bottom edge of luan plywood to get repeatable alignment and a positive lock from one module to the next. The scenic elements could then be extruded foam board used as insulation. I would think that something like Liquid Nails or possibly one of the Dow-Corning gasket types of tube sealants fould be used to affix the various elements to one another. The plywood end pieces would also allow for the various electrical/electronics harnesses to mate with one another rather than having dangling cables.

I am used to wires being routed and aligned as on the inside of an electronics chassis, but the point is that placing such a structure on a tubular aluminum frame would raise it to layout height. With machine bolts on each leg, the structure could be plumbed in all directions so that it is level front to back and side to side. I would like to be able to forgo the aluminum also, but I know legs of some sort are needed. I need to get to one of the box hardware stores (Lowe's, Home Depot, whatever) and see what I can find on the shelves that can be adapted.

If I come up with a solution for any or all of this, I'll try get some photos and post them as I move along the process of construction. I do expect to have to retrace some steps, but Murphy and his law are still out there.

Thanks to everyone for sharing thoughts, ideas, and such.

Kent K



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 Posted: Mon Nov 17th, 2014 10:52 am
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Salada
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Kent:

The alignment tongues (or fingers, or ears) system that I said that I had seen were a little like John's "Alignment Method 2" photo but not as sophisticated. Instead of 'interleaving' the 'ears' that I saw were all on the same end of the receiving 'female' module into which the male fitted.

Regards         Michael

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