Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Technical > Use of foamboard in benchwork construction

Because of non-railroad abuse of the site, new members MUST use their first names (at least) to join NO EXCEPTIONS!

Use of foamboard in benchwork construction
 Moderated by: oztrainz Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Fri Nov 21st, 2014 06:34 am
  PMQuoteReply
41st Post
oztrainz
Super Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 10th, 2013
Location: Unanderra, Australia
Posts: 691
Status: 
Offline
At Kent's request
I'll add in some ways to get lightweight scenery. This will involve posting some links to other forums/websites where the information resides

Perhaps the 2 lightest methods are "softrocks" as developed originally in the US by ? and further developed in Australia by Mark Fry with others and "FRocks" as documented by Mario Rapinett.

The rocks in the next photo are "softrocks" made from upholstery foam. These are probably 10+ years old and are still flexible and squishable without damage to the rock surface.



To get to Mario Rapinett's Frocks, go to http://www.modvid.com.au/html/body_frocks___rocks.html, for pictures of the Frocks on aluminium framing. More information on Mario's method is at http://members.westnet.com.au/mjbd/html/foam_rocks_-_frocks.html

The best description of the differences between softrocks and Frocks I have seen is at http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/17297 The rocks in the above photo are some of those in the Professor Klyzlr collection.The video in this posting is actually making Frock with a hard final surface rather the squishable surface of the "soft rocks".

Another lightweight method is to use the white polystyrene bead foam and cover it with a light handwipe cloth coverings using diluted soft acrylic caulking compound to hold the cloth to the whir polystyrene. This works well for rolling hill but is not rally effective for jagged cliff faces like the previous two methods
The first photo shows the white poltyerene bead foam shaped into the landform and held in place with pins while the glue is setting


The second photo shows the bare landform with the cloth attached

The third photo is of the same area after painting, groundcover of scrubby bush is still to be added


That ought to do for Round 1

Last edited on Fri Nov 21st, 2014 06:45 am by oztrainz



____________________
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra in oz
Back To Top

 Posted: Fri Nov 21st, 2014 07:00 am
  PMQuoteReply
42nd Post
Kent K
Registered


Joined: Sun Nov 9th, 2014
Location: Kansas City, Missouri USA
Posts: 59
Status: 
Offline
Thanks much John. I enjoyed our chats the other night. This project has turned into a real learning experience and I thank everyone who has contributed for the information and the spirit in which it is offered.

Kent K



____________________
Kent K
In a world without walls and fences, who needs Windows and Gates
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Nov 23rd, 2014 06:35 am
  PMQuoteReply
43rd Post
oztrainz
Super Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 10th, 2013
Location: Unanderra, Australia
Posts: 691
Status: 
Offline
Hi Kent and all,

Now for Round 2 - Cardboard to the Rescue

First up by using interleaved cardboard strips held in place with hot glue to provide the foundation, susbsequent treatment with Chux cloth and acrylic caulking compound. The cardbaord strips are from old cereal packets. The cloth helps to strengthen the cardoard web. This structure is still quite flexible but is quite tough. If pushed too hard however it can be permanently distorted.

The first photo shows the cardboard strips in place around the tipple deck piers 



The second photo shows the same area after painting and an initial layer of ground cover. scrubby trees and tall grass are yet to be installed



Another area where cardoard can save some weight is where it can be attached to by hot glue to  solid a solid structure - for example this embankment to the left of the brown side-tip skip



This embankment will be covered by some tall scrubby grass in a sheet,



simply by hot gluing the grass sheet to the supporting cardboard. The figure is O'scale. This type of scrub would be head-high heavy tangled undergrowth in HO.

Cardboard also makes a soild foundation to build retaining walls around

This first photo shows the cardboard for the retaining wall propped in place



and again when planked with stained stirrer sticks



These retaining walls are yet to be fully detailed - when finished they will look like:



That should do for Round 2. 

 

 




____________________
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra in oz
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Nov 23rd, 2014 09:35 am
  PMQuoteReply
44th Post
Herb Kephart
Super Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 6019
Status: 
Offline
John-

Interesting to see that you are using these methods outdoors. I've heard that it only rains once every 4 years in OZ, [:P] but how do you protect the layout from the elements? How about sharing a little more about the layout itself? Looks like some ambitious trackwork for an outdoor line--have a trackplan that you can post?

Herb



____________________
Fix it again, Mr Gates--it still works!"
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Nov 23rd, 2014 09:47 am
  PMQuoteReply
45th Post
Kent K
Registered


Joined: Sun Nov 9th, 2014
Location: Kansas City, Missouri USA
Posts: 59
Status: 
Offline
John,

I am amazed by the responses. I have added a great deal to my knowledge about this from your posts. I will certainly have to try some of these things. I appreciate the freedom of information flow that I have found here. It certainly shows that exchanges and asking for help are worthwhile. Thank you and I am glad to have been introduced to you. I will be following you posts and your progress. Thanks, mate, well done.



____________________
Kent K
In a world without walls and fences, who needs Windows and Gates
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Nov 23rd, 2014 02:20 pm
  PMQuoteReply
46th Post
oztrainz
Super Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 10th, 2013
Location: Unanderra, Australia
Posts: 691
Status: 
Offline
Herb Kephart wrote:
John-

Interesting to see that you are using these methods outdoors. I've heard that it only rains once every 4 years in OZ, [:P] but how do you protect the layout from the elements? How about sharing a little more about the layout itself? Looks like some ambitious trackwork for an outdoor line--have a trackplan that you can post?

Herb


Herb
I was building it outside because that was where the room to build it was.
As for weather protection, rain periods do put a significant crimp in construction activities, but I did buy one of these to speed things up.

Working outside in direct sun at 40+ Celsius (aka Fahrenheit century plus) is not real smart either.
;)

The start of the saga is in my Corrimal Colliery Incline thread in the Logging and Mining section of the Forum at

http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=5149&forum_id=11 The photos fill in some of the gaps between page 1 and page 2

I suppose I'd better go back and do some potholing in that thread - There are a few large holes in that thread about how we managed to do stuff. The module plan is already there. The Stage 1 trackplan is already there, Stages 2 and 3 are yet to have track laid.

Ambitious trackwork??? It's only a 25% grade (i in 4):Crazy:

Last edited on Sun Nov 23rd, 2014 02:24 pm by oztrainz



____________________
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra in oz
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Nov 24th, 2014 08:17 pm
  PMQuoteReply
47th Post
Herb Kephart
Super Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 6019
Status: 
Offline
John--

Yes, I remember the cable incline, but didn't realize that it is part of the latest posts.


Herb



____________________
Fix it again, Mr Gates--it still works!"
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Nov 19th, 2015 02:07 am
  PMQuoteReply
48th Post
George W
Registered


Joined: Thu Feb 19th, 2015
Location: California USA
Posts: 372
Status: 
Offline
I just did my first Pink Foam base board and other than the scary cost (they only had an expensive brand name) it worked great.

Right now the track is just pined to the foam, not too noisy until you get some speed. I'm planing on using Woodland Scenics foam road bed as its soft and seems to kill noise pretty good in videos I've seen.

Little caulk to mount it should do the trick.



____________________
George W.
"Well that didn't work"
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Oct 27th, 2016 01:34 pm
  PMQuoteReply
49th Post
Si.
Super Moderator


Joined: Thu Feb 23rd, 2012
Location: London
Posts: 2934
Status: 
Online
Hi Kent

How's things going.
Just been checking out this COOL thread !!

:moose:

Si.



____________________

' Mysterious Moose Mountain ' - 1:35n2 - pt.II
http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=7318&forum_id=17&page=1

' M:R:W Motor Speedway !!! ' - 1:32 Slotcar Racing Layout
http://www.slotforum.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=59295&st=0&a
Back To Top

 Posted: Thu Oct 27th, 2016 08:48 pm
  PMQuoteReply
50th Post
oztrainz
Super Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 10th, 2013
Location: Unanderra, Australia
Posts: 691
Status: 
Offline
Hi all,
L: there's some stuff here that hasn't made it to the Corrimal thread yet. I can pinch some of my own stuff to make updating the Top End of the Corrimal thread a whole lot easier :glad::glad:

Like Si, I am interested to see if Kent has made some progress,



____________________
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra in oz
Back To Top


 Current time is 01:54 am
Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  Next Page Last Page  

Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Technical > Use of foamboard in benchwork construction
Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems