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HBR&TCo
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 Posted: Fri Nov 13th, 2015 03:08 pm
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Reg H
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I have been building layouts since I was 12. I am now 67. Just about everybody builds nicer layouts than I do.

But I have fun.

Reg



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 Posted: Mon Nov 16th, 2015 05:43 pm
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Tileguy
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Been working on one for the last 4 years...Finally got the ties stained..Maybe next year I'll get the Rails painted...Ive built a few layouts in several different gauges....Never actually finished a single one yet...Not sure there is such a thing as a finished layout :)



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 Posted: Mon Nov 23rd, 2015 07:15 pm
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Reg H
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I made the decision to leave the east of the layout alone for a bit. Maybe work on one turnout at a time from time-to-time.

I am going to get some model building done.

Last night I picked up a project I set down over 30 years ago. It is a wooden through truss bridge.

While standing around gazing at the layout I spotted a place it will fit.

Construction includes installing a bunch, and I mean a bunch, of NBW castings. I got quite a few installed those many years ago on some of the horizontal members. I am still trying to figure out how I got them placed so accurately.

I will take some photos.

I put the sawmill project away for awhile. That is a huge project and I want to get some things built that will have some immediate impact.

Mostly I want to get the structures built for Henderson and do the limited amount of scenery that part of the layout will require. Except with the new bridge I will need to model a brackish backwater for it to cross.

I already have the depot and the water tank for Henderson built. I need to design and build a fish cannery (it will be a flat) and the main terminal building for the HBR&TCo. It will also be a flat.

Reg



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 Posted: Fri Nov 27th, 2015 11:37 am
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Reg H
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No progress on the layout today.

It is crystal clear here in the PNW. I'm goin' flying!

:)

Reg



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 Posted: Tue Dec 15th, 2015 03:34 pm
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Reg H
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Well, getting to this point has been interesting.  I have been trying to post photos.  The easy solution? Download Firefox and use that to access Freerails.  My usual browser, for several reasons, is Google Chrome.


Anyway!!! I have started construction on a kit I purchased many years ago. Like, 35 years ago.  I actually started construction way back then, too.  I don't remember why I bought the kit, or why I started construction, since I was not modelling narrow gauge at the time.


It is a model of a Howe Pony Truss bridge typical of practice of several of the Colorado narrow gauge railroads. 


The first photo shows the set up, on my Unimat, for locating and drilling the holes for the NBW casting for the top chords.



The second photo shows the completed top chord. 



Yes, the plans are that yellowed.  They have been around a long time.

I had completed the bottom cords way back when.  So the next steps in this project are to locate the drilling locations for the tension rods and drill those holes.  That will be a very fussy task.

As I was working on the this project I was having difficulties with the lead screw on my Unimat.  It was really stiff.  After close examination, it was obvious that the whole tool is a grubby, gummed up mess.  It has been around and in use for 30 some-odd years too.

So...the very next project is to completely disassemble the Unimat and take it up to the hangar where I have a set up to clean parts, and scrub everything until it is all shiny again.

Reg

Last edited on Tue Dec 15th, 2015 05:42 pm by Reg H



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 Posted: Mon Dec 21st, 2015 11:54 am
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Reg H
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I got the Unimat up to the hangar (where all my "heavy" tools reside).  Here are the Unimat parts all cleaned up and ready to go back together.


 
The black washers were an experiment that didn't work.  The hand wheels bear directly against the pillars. I figured the washers would make the operation all that much smoother.  Not enough threads.

And here is the Unimat back together and configured as the mill/drill for further work on the Howe Truss bridge.



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 Posted: Tue Dec 22nd, 2015 04:20 pm
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Alwin
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Hi Reg,

Your bridge kit looks more like scratch building if you have to do all the drilling yourself. On the other hand I never build a kit like that one so maybe it is the usual way.

It looks interesting, keep us updated.

Alwin

Last edited on Tue Dec 22nd, 2015 04:24 pm by Alwin

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 Posted: Tue Dec 22nd, 2015 07:17 pm
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Reg H
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Alwin:

There used to be a lot of kits that were not much more than a set of instructions and enough raw material to build the item in question.

This kit is pretty much in that category. Most of the strip wood is cut to length and there is a large collection of detail parts (like NBW castings), but a lot of final shaping, and certainly all the drilling, must be done by the builder.

I like it that way. The new laser cut kits are nice and go together rapidly. But the reason I usually buy a kit is to avoid doing all the research. Otherwise, I prefer to scratch build.

There still are a few kits of this nature. I built a trestle a couple of years ago that met that description and my sawmill kit is like that.

Reg



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 Posted: Wed Dec 23rd, 2015 12:16 pm
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Alwin
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Personally I also like the research part of the job. The great benefit of scratch building is that you can choose your own dimensions and looks of buildings / structures. Kits make the build a bit easier.
The stuff your building is somewere in the middle, I like that.

Alwin

Last edited on Wed Dec 23rd, 2015 12:17 pm by Alwin

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 Posted: Mon Dec 28th, 2015 01:18 pm
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Reg H
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My life doesn't allow me a lot of time for model building.  That will change.

But for right now I consider myself lucky if I can get away to the model shop for a couple of hours every now and then.

I managed that over the weekend and got some work done on two projects.  I managed to get some work done on fixing the turnout problem outlined previously, and I spent some time on the Howe Truss bridge.

As mentioned, the next pending step was was accurately locating the hole locations for the vertical rods that form the tension members of the bridge. 

I accomplished this by taking the measurements off the plans using a divider and transferring those measurements to the top and bottom cords starting at the centerlines.

Thusly:


Then I used a square to draw lines across the cord.

Like this:



And then line up the center lines to ensure that everything lined up.



If you look closely you will see that the members in the photo are market with a faint "Y" at the left end.  The other set is marked with an "X".  This is to ensure that the sets stay together and that they are matched end-to-end.  A problem I ran into when drilling for the NBW's.

The next challenge was figuring out which rods go where.  The plans list the prototype dimensions. There are four different diameter tension rods.  The kit only provides two different diameters, .035" and .046".

So, which rods go where?

Fortunately, the landing plates for the compression members are drilled for the different sizes of wire.  So it was just a matter of lining up the plates and figuring out what wires went where.  A very necessary step before drilling the holes.



There are seven sets of tension members on each side.  I determined that the two outside sets on each side needed to be .046" wire.  The other sets would be the .035". 

Once having done that I came out one length of .046" wire short. Fortuntely, I had some .046" brass wire on hand. If you look close at the set that is second from the left on the bottom row, you can see that one of the wires is brass.  All of the others are steel.  Once painted it won't matter.

Reg



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