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HBR&TCo
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 Posted: Mon Dec 28th, 2015 08:05 pm
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pipopak
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All of the others are steel.  Once painted it won't matter.
... but you KNOW... and we KNOW that you KNOW....
The blackmailers line starts behind me. Jose.



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 Posted: Tue Dec 29th, 2015 12:26 pm
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Reg H
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pipopak wrote:
All of the others are steel.  Once painted it won't matter.
... but you KNOW... and we KNOW that you KNOW....
The blackmailers line starts behind me. Jose.


OH NO!!! A rivet counter!

:)

Reg



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 Posted: Sat Jan 2nd, 2016 06:38 pm
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Reg H
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I have started assembly of the first truss of the Howe Truss Bridge.



This is a dry fit of the tension members.  I am delighted to see that almost everything lines up.  It is the "almost" that will cause me a bit of work.

Fitting all the rods into place is very tedious and time consuming.  And it looks like the holes for the rods second from the right are not quite line up and the pad for the timber is not square.  Hard to tell.

I will know when I dry fit the timbers.  If that one pad is not square, I will need to disassemble all this and drill two of the holes (one in the top cord, one in the bottom cord) oversize.

I haven't figured out how I am going to glue all this together.  The pads are plastic, the rods are steel and brass and the timbers, obviously, are wood.  The rods probably won't be glued.  They will be held in place by the NBW casting on the outboard side of the holes.

I am pretty sure I will use JB Weld to join the pads to the cords.  I may also use JB Weld for all the rest of it.   

Reg





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 Posted: Sat Jan 2nd, 2016 07:23 pm
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Reg H
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Here is a close up of the set up to drill the vertical holes in the top and bottom cords for the tension members.

I couldn't use the vise because of the installed NBW castings. 



I usually prefer to have everything secured in place to ensure accuracy.  I got lazy here.  I could have used some milling clamps.  It worked anyway.

Regarding the Unimat...this is one of the most useful modeling tools you can own, even if you don't plan on doing any serious machine work.  I have had mine for over thirty years.  Long ago I used it to do some pretty serious machine work.  But in recent years it has been useful as a small drill press and some very simple machine processes in a variety of materials. 

The Unimat is no longer manufactured and the machines are not available new.  But there are some used ones in good condition available on eBay.  The $400-$500 price may seem expensive, but if you build models, even kits, you will find the machine invaluable if you can scrape up the money. 

I am sure drilling the holes for this bridge would have taken more time and resulted in more errors without my Unimat.

I not only use mine as a small, very precise, drill press, but I also machine out window openings  and such in wood and plastic, turn small, simple parts from plastic and brass, and bore precise holes, mostly in plastic. 

It can save your bacon.  I have been working, in fits and starts, on a sawmill.  One of the small rollers that came with a castings kit had a problem that wouldn't allow me to bore out the shaft hole.  There was something very hard imbedded in the casting. So I turned a new part from brass rod.  I could have contacted the kit supplier for a new part. But it was faster and more fun to make a new one.

I have hopes of adding one of the mini-lathes and mini vertical mills to my shop someday in the future.  I don't really have the time to devote to serious scratch building at present. Nor do I have the money to set up a real machine shop.

But the day will come.

Reg

Last edited on Sat Jan 2nd, 2016 07:26 pm by Reg H



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 Posted: Fri Jan 8th, 2016 11:36 pm
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Reg H
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I had some questions about Dan's windows (Raley Creek & Black Forest) and promised him some photos.

In the interest of not hijacking his thread, I am putting the photos on my thread.

Here is the depot of which I was speaking.



It is scratch built using Evergreen Scale Models styrene, including lap strip, lap siding and scribed siding.  The shingles are from Evergreen Hill Designs.  It is not quite finished and may never be.  I changed the track plan and now there is no place for it.

Here is a close up of the window frames, which are built up from styrene strip.



And here is the little depot that took its place.  It is a laser kit.  I forget the manufacturer.  I used the Evergreen Hill Designs shingles on this one, too.



Reg



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2016 04:11 am
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Shoulders
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Hi Reg

That looks great, I love working with styrene properly because I've used it all my life up until I started on30 and found new technics and materials. Even to the point that I have donated all my Enamel paints to the club except ones for staining wood and now using Acrylics.

Styrene is easy to make it look like wood just scribe it, you could even to it now even after you have painted it by simply scratching it and then applying a wash.

Windows are brilliant, A guy called tony down my club scratch builds he's own windows too. Don't know how you both have the patients to do it.

Love your workman ship and the Milling machine, my Dad has the same but the Lath could have had one my self in new condition at a bargain price with tonnes of extras included. Turned the offer down, so kicking my self in the teeth now...:bang:

Been meaning to ask you.. have you any images of how you hunkered down your caboose. I have managed to lower mine down by simply fitting the smaller Bachmann wheels, it looks ok but much prefer the look of your caboose, it looks perfect with less open space below.

All the best cheers Dan



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Daniel
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http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=5794&forum_id=4
My Club-http://www.ehmrc.org.uk/about.html
Our Club Exhibition-http://www.ehmrc.org.uk/exhibs.html
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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2016 12:06 pm
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Reg H
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Dan:

Building up the windows is tedious. Future scratch built projects will use commercially available windows if there are any more than just a few.

There was an article (actually, more than one) in the Gazette a few years ago about hunkering Bachmann equipment. I did the caboose off the first one. It involves off down coupler pockets (I used the Unimat, but the author used a Dremel) and replacing the wheels with HO wheels (36", I think). The original couplers were replaced with Kadees.

The later article cuts down the bolsters and coupler pockets. I will be using that method for the rest of my freight equipment.

I will put together a little "how to" when I get around to it for those that haven't been subscribing to the Gazette. They don't sell back issues anymore, though they have a dandy DVD that contains all the back issues of the Gazette as well as the preceding publication. I will also scruffle around and find the issues in which those articles appeared.

I also moved the cupola from dead center.

Reg



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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2016 12:10 pm
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Reg H
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One other observation on all this...

The surface on which you apply paint can dramatically impact the final color.

Both depots were painted the same color (Floquil Depot Olive. I still have a few bottles of Floquil laying around) from the same bottle.

One depot is plastic, the other wood.

Reg



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 Posted: Sun Jan 10th, 2016 05:47 am
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Shoulders
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Hi Reg:

I have noticed that, the wood on my depot I painted with Southern railway Dark olive green which is really rich is colour but the lamp post that's with it and is made of brass looks more like light olive/US army green.

Dan



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http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=6667&forum_id=6
http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=5794&forum_id=4
My Club-http://www.ehmrc.org.uk/about.html
Our Club Exhibition-http://www.ehmrc.org.uk/exhibs.html
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 Posted: Mon Jan 11th, 2016 02:36 am
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Kitbash0n30
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Reg H wrote: Some time ago I hacked up and hunkered one of the cabooses.There's a potential railroad name in there, the H&H, the Hacked and Hunkered.



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