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Newbie intro currently modelling 1:45
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 Posted: Fri Feb 19th, 2016 03:01 pm
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Tim H
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Hi,

Now, this is an inspirational image.




At Buseck I found a very nice O Scale Models Esso tank wagon for just Euro25 and a pair of Schnellenkamp Lenz coupling adaptors for about Euro15.




First, I removed the brakehouse and gave it a wash, just the first of many.




Then I fitted new couplings and another wash.




I need to do something about the brake platform and missing brake column but the weathering is looking better.



Last edited on Fri Feb 19th, 2016 03:02 pm by Tim H



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 Posted: Fri Feb 19th, 2016 03:59 pm
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Herb Kephart
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Interesting little piece, Tim.

I didn't know that ESSO had a presence in the EU

Herb



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 Posted: Fri Feb 19th, 2016 09:35 pm
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Robert Comerford
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The last time I looked Herb, Germany isn't in the UK! ( big grin)

cheers
Bob

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 Posted: Sat Feb 20th, 2016 12:00 am
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Herb Kephart
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Gosh dangit Bob, you're right!

That's what senility will do for you-----

Herb



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 Posted: Wed Apr 20th, 2016 01:46 pm
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Tim H
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Maybe not eveeryone's first choice of an exciting item but these rather nifty manholes are simply superb. The come from Michael Schnellenkamp's O gauge store in Germany (try Googling)  and there are three in each pack, the brink surround is a separate item whilst you have a choice of three centres.

I used a Silverline cutter to make the necessary hole in the card roadway, later I will fill the gaps but it looks very convincing and far better than the thin etched manholes.

Whilst we are on the subject of details, be aware that not everyone has the same sense of O Scale, in Europe we use either 1:43 or 1:45 but I bought some details from SD Models which seemed to be a mixture of 1:32 and 1:76 with a bit of 1:43 thrown in for good measure. Neither were they cheap or particularly good - you pays your money etc.



And now for something a bit different:



This is my pride n'joy, a brass model of a goods loco used in Southern Germany, its full title is a BR98.8, I am showing off because it is the reward of a long search and the epitome of branchline motive power. Currently it is under going a rebuild for DCC sound and some detail changes but it will be returning home within a few weeks once it is tested and running.

Pottendorf, is still coming along nicely. At this time of the year, I cease fiddling with trains and re-start work on the scenery. This might sound odd but it is infinitely better to look outside and see the actual green stuff that you are trying to replicate and winter is a long time to spend making wagons and locos.

Finally, a plea, I use almost exclusively rather old wagons from a long defunct firm - Pola Maxi- they were sold in the US under the AHM label. They rather plain but I need them, please keep an eye open. I search Ebay but often folk on forums come up trumps.

Toodle Pip  

Last edited on Wed Apr 20th, 2016 09:50 pm by Tim H



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 Posted: Thu Apr 21st, 2016 11:45 am
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Tim H
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Guys,

Whilst I may still have your attention, this link will take you to a simple explanatory article about click here Bayerische Nebenbahnen

Tim



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 Posted: Sun Apr 24th, 2016 08:24 am
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Tim H
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Daniel Schreber and his legacyDaniel Gottlob Moritz Schreber (15 October 1808 – 10 November 1861) His publications predominantly dealt with the subject of children's health and the social consequences of urbanization at the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. Schreber was the founder of the eponymous "Schreber movement".  In 1864, the first Schrebergarten, was established by leasing land for the physical exercise of children.



 Move forward 150+ years and you're zipping along in an ICE high-speed train, munching happily away on your bratwurst , just as you're wiping the last blob of mustard from the corner of your mouth, a lazy glance out the window, though, comes as a shock. Rather than the well-ordered suburbs or well-kept factories you have come to expect- miniature houses tucked in next to the train tracks as far as the eye can see.

It's a sight that greets visitors on the approach to almost every town in Germany --  the clutter of ladders and rakes leaning against the back of the structures, neatly ordered flowerbeds, well-tended fruit trees and picture-perfect picket fences are lined up like regiments of tin soldiers. The phenomenon is known as a Schrebergärten -- an area outside the city where the gardening-obsessed Germans can rent out a small plot and plunge their fingers into the soil.

But while getting back to nature is an instinct many of us indulge in, the German gardener takes it very seriously indeed. Flawlessly clipped lawns, neatly sculpted bushes, and flowerbeds entirely free of even the tiniest weed are the norm with many gardens revealing a feng shui exactness that would put a Japanese bonsai master to shame. Other vegetation virtuosos prefer a more playful perfection and opt for a liberal distribution of garden gnomes and plastic windmills with cheap replicas of Greek fountains and other water features a must for those with a bit of cash to burn.

Ordered, trimmed, enclosed, ornamental, each strip has some kind of glorified shed with floral and vegetable displays. As for people, they’re only temporary visitors, because however fabulous the summerhouse/cottage/shed – and some are very fancy –one of the many hundreds of rules is that a Schrebergärten is strictly non-residential and rules are there to be obeyed. These enclosures are the garden equivalent of white bread: nature with the wildness extracted – and with more fertilizer per square metre than any farmer would dare to use.


Unfinished, lots to do

I like creating Schrebergärten, a few year ago I created a 1:76 vegetable garden, the only differences in 1:45 are the size and cost of the plants - mine are Scenic Express because I could not find anything elsewhere. The set includes strawberries, green and red cabbage, cauliflower, green and red lettuce. Over the next couple of weeks, I will share the creation of a Schrebergärten for Pottendorf.

My apologies for mentioning a European socialist concept but occasionally we like to remind the colonies of their past and considering the vast majority of US immigrants originated in Central Europe, an understanding of their rich heritage is important.

Tim H







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 Posted: Sun Apr 24th, 2016 03:22 pm
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Herb Kephart
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Tim

I for one enjoyed your mentioning the German love of gardening, which is a surprise to me. When I thought of back yard gardening in the past, I automatically thought of England. It seemed to me that every Englishman had to have one, or at least lusted for one. Do any of the other European people have this obsession to the same intensity?

Not trying to start an argument about who is the most intense in this desire, just wondering.


Herb



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 Posted: Sun Apr 24th, 2016 04:37 pm
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Tim H
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Herb,

Gardening is a worldwide interest, wherever a garden is possible there will be someone willing to part of nature.

It is a something that gives far more than it takes, it is not 'yardwork' instead it is far more rewarding.

Tim



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 Posted: Mon May 2nd, 2016 03:18 pm
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Tim H
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My skillset for creating model buildings is not too hot, I used to knock out some nice stuff from HO kits but moving up to O and craftsman-type kits is a whole new ballgame. I decided to use the range from Stangel.pl because their products are appropriate for the location and I rather like their modelling philosophy - laser cut cardboard. Three kits arrived a couple of months ago and I started with the easiest - a farm building. This is the first stage- the cardboard buck.

For the surface treatment, I use Stangel's own product - Acrylmasse - because it is cheap (Eu3,50 for 250gm) and it is easy to use and consistent. A  first covering of the Acrylmasse using a stiff 12mm nylon brush with a stippling action to good effect.

Due to the light colouring, it is difficult to see the actual effect of the surface treatment however with a simple application of a subtle wash, the texture will be readily apparent.

Due to the nature of the material used, modification is easy, I used wooden coffee stirrers for the bargeboards and to position the roof with hidden strips. The next building is a rural cottage.....more to follow.

Last edited on Mon May 2nd, 2016 03:18 pm by Tim H



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