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W C Greene
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Tim wrote--

Hi,

After almost a lifetime of HO, I have moved to 1:45 for the sake of my eyesight and doddery fingers.

Rather than abandon my core interest, I merely increased everything in size, this has forced a change of direction from main to branch line (nebenbahn) otherwise everything is reassuringly familiar.  

All this is possibly thanks to the entreprenerurial skills of Lenz Gmbh who have provided the basics for my chosen subject allowing me to continue scratchbuilding structures and scenery.

The subject is a small branchline in Oberfranken, the Ebermannstadt line provides much of the inspiration but it isn't a copy - I haven't got the space in the workshop, it is just 4,8x3m but the line is a continuous run with a rudimentary station on one side and a brewery complex on t'other (sorry, no beer vans)

The HO layout ran ten trains, the new 1:45 runs just four but this is more than enough as I am planning to build some rolling stock when I retire but in the meantime, I am building the layout.

Much of the weathering and diorama inspiration comes from military modelling circles rather than the railway community, the reason that I drifted into Freerails was a good prodding from Martin 'Odds' Field who suggested that I contribute as well as learn.

My blog is to be found here

Tim H

 

 



Howdy Tim and welcome to Freerails. I know that you will find a lot of interesting threads here, some of us are familiar with military modeling. I use many 1:35 military details in my railway modeling, in fact my entire layout is 1:35 scale.
Send photos and posts, we are waiting.

Woodie

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Tim,



I spent a couple hours at Tim's blog last night, and also at a few of the blogs that he has linked.

Saw some very fine modeling--No, it isn't the US Southwest, but those here who appreciate quality work will have a difficult time resisting the urge to look at ''just one more thing''. I certainly know that I did.

Our friends in the UK have a phase--''highly recomended''.

Herb

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Nice stuff. I like that platform building.

Tim H
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The track plan is pretty simple, only four visible turnouts but that is fine as I only own four trains. The layout is really a large diorama that is built around a photo of a tiny halt called Veilbronn in Oberfranken, it wasn't much of a place, just a loop and a single siding but it holds a lot of happy memories.

If you click Veilbronn there is a link to the posts about building the diorama - enjoy.

Tim H



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Good to see you here, Tim.
I told you they were a nice bunch.

Herb, in the UK we seem to be taking to blogs and kicking the forums into touch. Present company excepted, of course. I have made a couple of new friends by reading blogs and linking through. Iain Robinson's blog is "highly recommended". That's how I found Tim!

Cheers,
Martin

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This is the only available photo of the station yard at Veilbronn, it was used for loading and storing timber. Out of sight, to the right of the train and hidden by the treeline was the station building.

Trying replicate this simple scene in the space available is going to be a challenge.



The white rectangle represents the base of the wooden building that once stood in the yard. To recreate the yard, a layer of Chinchilla Dust was sieved over wet PVA and then sanded after it was dry, the resulting imperfections are typical of a rural location. 

At the other end of the yard, stands the station building, apparantly on a flat surface however there is a platform and roadway.



The grey surface is Heki Asphalt dusted with a mixture of white/yellow powder paint to highlight imperfections and kill the uniformity of the colour. Later applications of grass and foliage will highlight the changes in surface height and soften the hard edges.

Tim H

Last edited on Fri Dec 19th, 2014 04:40 am by Tim H

W C Greene
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Very nice, precise work. Your structures are really fine...great workmanship! I know that you will be able to replicate the station yard in the space you have, judging from your other projects, you will have no problem.
Thank you for joining us, we appreciate fine modeling and they let me post here even though nothing I do is fine.

Woodie

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Aw, c'mon, Woodie. Everything you do is both fine AND dandy.

Martin

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Christmas can be boring - once the food and drink have gone, what else is there, not everyone has grandchildren and 'borrowing' a couple is not an option. Nothing but repeats on television but the shed offers sanctuary and somewhere to smoke that Romeo Y Julieta whilst doing something useful.

These are this year's Christmas treats - a loading ramp and the yard office, neither are completely finished as they need some weathering but they are nice.






The ramp uses a old toffee apple stick, as the rubbing timber. 

The photos remind me that I have a lot of scenic work to do in the next few days.

Tim

*Given to me by mum (1920-13)

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Shed looks good, Tim.
A bit of judicious weathering and it'll fit right in.

Cheers,
Martin

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Great end of track ''bumper' (not sure of the UK name for that item).

A lot more detail than the usual -- for the US, both prototype and model-- pile of sleepers, or even just dirt.

Other little things, like the chip in the side of the ramp--that kind of thing catches my eye.

Carry on!


Herb

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We call 'em buffer stops, Herb, but Tim's layout is set in Germany. Not sure what they're called over there, but it'll be something logical like Wagen Stopfer or such like.

Cheers,
Martin

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prellbock

Paglesham
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Prellbock?
Thanks Tim, what does it actually translate as?

Martin

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Paglesham wrote:
Prellbock?
Thanks Tim, what does it actually translate as?

Martin


Buffer

Tim H
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Dwayne wrote:
Paglesham wrote:
Prellbock?
Thanks Tim, what does it actually translate as?

Martin


Buffer


Buffer? Errr, no.That would be puffer but prellbock is German for bufferstop which is the correct translation.

Tim H

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Thanks, Tim. I thought it might break down into something more amusingly Germanic.
In the car industry we had Apfelstopfern, which were exactly that. Bars under van seats to stop items (especially apples?) rolling around and possibly getting under your feet.
And scheinwerfer. Light thrower...headlight. Easy to remember.

Cheers,
Martin

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Although most regard the choice of subject is somewhat leftfield, it is a logical choice based on the immutable givens - lack of space. I have just 4,8x3m and this precludes the use of bogie stock, so that removes both US and British outline from the choice.

Luckily, many mainland European countries still used updated two and three axle coaches until the 80s although only Germany offers good O gauge models and a great support culture.

Ironically, I don't intend to build either a typical German layout, I want to build it with warts n'all with not too many miniature people/autos but lots of subtle weathering and essential details. The structures are almost all scratchbuildt, just one kit (the shed) with only the rolling stock and track are bought in.

The US market provides a number of hard to find details and much of the inspiration for the weathering, unfortunately I just don't want to build a logging/mining layout with which I have no connection. The little branchline featured here has been a regular holiday destination for the past thirty years and I have tried to replicate some of the local structures on the layout, such as the biergarten.



Pretty cool?


Tim

Last edited on Mon Dec 29th, 2014 06:27 am by Tim H

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Love that 2 liter glass, Tim!

And whats in it.

Herb

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Looks like a Weissbier glass to me. Tastes like bubble gum!
If I couldn't get Altbier when I was in Germany for 4 years, I'd have a Radler, what we Brits call a Shandy. I hate lager, so anything that improves its flavour works for me. Apparently a Radler is a cyclist. I guess our Northern German cyclists are not appreciated wobbling all over the road. Can't recall what a Bavarian shandy was called now. But there was a better selection of proper ale-like drinks in Bayern. Failing that, one could always get a Guinness in any of the Irish bars that Germany loves. I used to drink all evening for nothing by just pretending I was Irish! I have a knack for accents:-)

Cheers,
Martin

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Herb Kephart wrote:
Love that 2 liter glass, Tim!

And whats in it.

Herb


Herb,

I hate to disappoint you but the glass is 500ml, a full 1ltr stein is normally only used for draft beer.

Just to upset even more, the local drinks market is selling 5.5% Koenigs at just $1.25 for a standard 500ml bottle and you receive $0.45 when you return the empty.

Tim H

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Hi Tim

Glad you joined and able to show us your modelling, also nice to see another UK modeller.

Kind regards
Dan

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Hi Dan,

It is a pleasure to visit this forum and meet so many interesting, friendly folk.

Thank you and happy new year.

Tim

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Having spent the last few evenings working on Pottendorf's scenery, I thought that a little more colour would not go amiss.

This is the bufferstop, behind is the loading ramp, the bits of foliage add some interest to the scene.



It still isn't finished but I really enjoy adding more details.

Tim H


10th Jan Just added some more greenery


Last edited on Sat Jan 10th, 2015 09:22 am by Tim H

Tim H
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Every Sunday, same old thing - sitting in the workshop and catching up on tasks around Pottendorf, this Sunday,  it is weathering some oil drums, just like these.




I had half a dozen resin 55 gallon drums by Unit Models, to ease handling, they were stuck to a coffee stirrer and painted with acrylic raw sienna. Although a couple of coats is enough, the consistency of the paint (Crawford & Black) provides some interesting texture.




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Nice work on that bumper and ramp. The shrubs and weeds look terrific.

Re: the prototype barrels -- wow, that is bright rust! Great stuff. Funny how many color variations of rust there are.

Tim H
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Ray,

Most modellers would simply use the 'rust' colour paint however the only guide should be the prototype, hence the photo.

Tim

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Tim H wrote:
Ray,

Most modellers would simply use the 'rust' colour paint however the only guide should be the prototype, hence the photo.



So true!

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I agree Tim

Too many modelers (myself included at times) haven't looked at the prototype closely enough and duplicate what they have seen other modelers do. Carried to a small extreme, photos of the prototype start to look amiss.

Herb

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Hi there,

It would be inappropriate to claim that only the prototype is correct, if too small a sample is taken. Instead, it is better to look at as many examples of the prototype as possible in order to better understand what you are trying to achieve.

Not all rusty drums are the same, it is purely subjective what you select, just as long as you are comfortable with your decision and the subsequent outcome.

Tim

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Another building in the brewery group is completed, this is the warehouse.

Btw the wooden outhouse is a lucam.





The ends of the building are resin castings, everything else is scratchbuilt.

The ballasting on the scenic side of the layout is almost complete, if I can finish the remaining stretch on Friday night, I can run trains on Sunday. First time in six months:rah::rah::rah:

Tim

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Very nice work, Tim. Is the stonework carved in Daz clay or is it impressed into Foamex?

Martin

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At #26 in this thread, I posted some interesting images of abandoned 55-gal oil drums and my own half-assed attempts to capture the texture of the rust.

This evening, I finally placed the drums in a similar attitude and puffed some grass around them.



I rather like the contrasts.

Tim

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Here, everything but the kitchen sink is used to hold some paper nettles in place whilst the glue dries. A lot more detailing needs to be in place before the scene is complete but that is the pleasure of scenic modelling, it is never finished.


Paglesham
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I do like the finish on the pole barn, Tim, and photo-etched nettles! Very nice. Nettles, the holy grail of model weeds!

Martin

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The lean-to is just stripwood, coloured with Windsor&Newton ink but I had to abrade the surface to remove all traces of PVA. The bits that I failed to eradicate look rather good.:o)

The nettles are actually paper, please look at the post.



OK, the glue has hardened, a few more weeds added but they need some flowerheads to make them stand out.

Tim


Last edited on Mon Feb 9th, 2015 11:30 am by Tim H

Paglesham
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I didn't see the word "paper", but the effect is similar.

Martin

Tim H
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In another thread, someone has suggested that  "We get motivated from the "see how I did this" type rather than the "see what I did" posting.

Unfortunately, I don't agree as I am inspired by any work by a modeller in whatever manner it is presented and it is the subject matter that does it for me.

But as there seems to be a desire to present a blow by blow account of "how I did it" this is the sequence of events behind the mousehole that allows the track to emerge into the brewery yard rather than just run around the corner of the layout.

First problem, the scenic break is almost parallel to the track, so the length of the aperture is going to be oversize.


Though side clearances are still very tight



The tunnel mouth is positioned at right-angles to the track, though I think that the casting, as supplied, is a tad too tall and needs some drastic surgery to correct the problem



Finally, the inner wall will provide a base for the embankment that hides the mousehole.

 

Everyone happy about "how I did this"?

Tim

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In another thread, someone has suggested that  "We get motivated from the "see how I did this" type rather than the "see what I did" posting.

Unfortunately, I don't agree as I am inspired by any work by a modeller in whatever manner it is presented and it is the subject matter that does it for me.


One size fits nobody. Also you missed the "usually" part... Jose.

Last edited on Tue Feb 10th, 2015 08:01 am by pipopak

Tim H
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I managed to reduce the height of the resin casting by 40mm - proportionally better.

All I need to do is stick everything in place and make the green bits.


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pipopak wrote: In another thread, someone has suggested that  "We get motivated from the "see how I did this" type rather than the "see what I did" posting.

Unfortunately, I don't agree as I am inspired by any work by a modeller in whatever manner it is presented and it is the subject matter that does it for me.


One size fits nobody. Also you missed the "usually" part... Jose.

And moving on,

The following should fulfill the requirement to show, SBS, the process of creating something from scratch, in this case a bufferstop or prellbock. The finished item is not a total success, I failed to achieve the 'look' of flower heads but I won't stop trying.

The cost of the bufferstop was just a couple of dollars, mostly due to the balsa wood. The blue foam was just scrap pieces and the stain is my favourite, Windsor&Newton ink. The obtain the faded white paint, I just wiped some acyrlic over the bumper beam and immediately dabbed it against a piece of kitchen towel to remove the majority of the paint.

The real benefit is the sense of 'I made this rather than bought it' and an odd hour of enjoyable modelling.




 





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I forgot to add that this is the last post on the thread, indeed it is my 100th post. I have tried to provide some entertaining accounts of how I have created the layout but the forum seems to be more about the social aspects of the community and little too much grumbling.

Thanks but I think that I will heed my own words and move on (or rather back) to my own comfort zone of modelling rather than blathering.

Tim

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Hi Tim.

I haven't given a reaction on this thread before. But I see you want to quit the forum.
I think if you don't like the threads with social grumbling than just don't participate in them, I also do not.
I guess there is no forum wich can satisfy you for 100%. But beside the social talk there are a lot of fine modelers here. I like to see their work and like to read about it. If you don't get many response on your thread it doesn't mean no one likes it. I hope you change your mind and remains a member of this forum, cause I like your modeling although I haven't given a reaction before.

Alwin

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Hi there,

After four months of just watching Freerails, I began to realise that social interaction is the glue that binds the community. In short, I got it wrong.

So, here's a few shots of what has been going on since February, in no particular order.



This is brewery and warehouse, both scratchbuilt but I did use some precast resin sections.




An experiment in trackside flowers




The yard is about 80% complete, I just need to add trees and a backscene.





In March, I visited the 0 gauge meet in Buseck and bought two brass locos, yesterday their sound systems were completed.

    

This was me in '59, the station is the one being modelled but the name has changed.

  
 
Finally, the farm





Staying off the computer has allowed me to progress the layout.




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Very nice work on the buildings, Tim-- and a couple of unusual (to US eyes) locos!

Herb

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Herb,

The locos were built for different purposes but finally migrated to branchline use.

The larger 2-4-0 was a fast(ish)loco built for suburban passenger trains, the odd space between the cylinders and wheels was to concentrate weight on the driving wheels.

The smaller 'box' loco was an attempt to save on manpower by removing the need of a fireman. All coal was delivered to the firebox from the coal hopper controlled by a foor lever. In practice, the fireman was retained as he also had to look after the couplings, top up the coal etc. during service. Similar devices became the motive power unit for railmotors - semi-loco+coach, some were successful but the majority lacked the flexibility of a separate loco + rolling stock.

Both locos survived until the early 60s, 70 083 was mounted on a plinth in Muhldorf in the late 80s. In the 90s the loco was 'liberated' and last June we travelled behind 70 083 to Holzkirchen.



If anyone is interested in more info, just ask.

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The full story of the 'box' loco, affectionately known as 'Glaskasten', can be read here.

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The last run of the Spalter Bockl

Shoulders
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Hi Tim

Glad your back and the layout has come along over that period. Like the buildings.

I have seen that Loco quite a few times and have always wondered why it had that Wheel arrangement or large gap between the front pony wheel and the main drivers. Love to know how the suspension and side play works, especially for going around curves.

Cheers Dan

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isn't that ramp not to steep??

Tim H
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Hi,

Now, this is an inspirational image.




At Buseck I found a very nice O Scale Models Esso tank wagon for just Euro25 and a pair of Schnellenkamp Lenz coupling adaptors for about Euro15.




First, I removed the brakehouse and gave it a wash, just the first of many.




Then I fitted new couplings and another wash.




I need to do something about the brake platform and missing brake column but the weathering is looking better.



Last edited on Fri Feb 19th, 2016 03:02 pm by Tim H

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Interesting little piece, Tim.

I didn't know that ESSO had a presence in the EU

Herb

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The last time I looked Herb, Germany isn't in the UK! ( big grin)

cheers
Bob

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Gosh dangit Bob, you're right!

That's what senility will do for you-----

Herb

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Maybe not eveeryone's first choice of an exciting item but these rather nifty manholes are simply superb. The come from Michael Schnellenkamp's O gauge store in Germany (try Googling)  and there are three in each pack, the brink surround is a separate item whilst you have a choice of three centres.

I used a Silverline cutter to make the necessary hole in the card roadway, later I will fill the gaps but it looks very convincing and far better than the thin etched manholes.

Whilst we are on the subject of details, be aware that not everyone has the same sense of O Scale, in Europe we use either 1:43 or 1:45 but I bought some details from SD Models which seemed to be a mixture of 1:32 and 1:76 with a bit of 1:43 thrown in for good measure. Neither were they cheap or particularly good - you pays your money etc.



And now for something a bit different:



This is my pride n'joy, a brass model of a goods loco used in Southern Germany, its full title is a BR98.8, I am showing off because it is the reward of a long search and the epitome of branchline motive power. Currently it is under going a rebuild for DCC sound and some detail changes but it will be returning home within a few weeks once it is tested and running.

Pottendorf, is still coming along nicely. At this time of the year, I cease fiddling with trains and re-start work on the scenery. This might sound odd but it is infinitely better to look outside and see the actual green stuff that you are trying to replicate and winter is a long time to spend making wagons and locos.

Finally, a plea, I use almost exclusively rather old wagons from a long defunct firm - Pola Maxi- they were sold in the US under the AHM label. They rather plain but I need them, please keep an eye open. I search Ebay but often folk on forums come up trumps.

Toodle Pip  

Last edited on Wed Apr 20th, 2016 09:50 pm by Tim H

Tim H
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Guys,

Whilst I may still have your attention, this link will take you to a simple explanatory article about click here Bayerische Nebenbahnen

Tim

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Daniel Schreber and his legacyDaniel Gottlob Moritz Schreber (15 October 1808 – 10 November 1861) His publications predominantly dealt with the subject of children's health and the social consequences of urbanization at the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. Schreber was the founder of the eponymous "Schreber movement".  In 1864, the first Schrebergarten, was established by leasing land for the physical exercise of children.



 Move forward 150+ years and you're zipping along in an ICE high-speed train, munching happily away on your bratwurst , just as you're wiping the last blob of mustard from the corner of your mouth, a lazy glance out the window, though, comes as a shock. Rather than the well-ordered suburbs or well-kept factories you have come to expect- miniature houses tucked in next to the train tracks as far as the eye can see.

It's a sight that greets visitors on the approach to almost every town in Germany --  the clutter of ladders and rakes leaning against the back of the structures, neatly ordered flowerbeds, well-tended fruit trees and picture-perfect picket fences are lined up like regiments of tin soldiers. The phenomenon is known as a Schrebergärten -- an area outside the city where the gardening-obsessed Germans can rent out a small plot and plunge their fingers into the soil.

But while getting back to nature is an instinct many of us indulge in, the German gardener takes it very seriously indeed. Flawlessly clipped lawns, neatly sculpted bushes, and flowerbeds entirely free of even the tiniest weed are the norm with many gardens revealing a feng shui exactness that would put a Japanese bonsai master to shame. Other vegetation virtuosos prefer a more playful perfection and opt for a liberal distribution of garden gnomes and plastic windmills with cheap replicas of Greek fountains and other water features a must for those with a bit of cash to burn.

Ordered, trimmed, enclosed, ornamental, each strip has some kind of glorified shed with floral and vegetable displays. As for people, they’re only temporary visitors, because however fabulous the summerhouse/cottage/shed – and some are very fancy –one of the many hundreds of rules is that a Schrebergärten is strictly non-residential and rules are there to be obeyed. These enclosures are the garden equivalent of white bread: nature with the wildness extracted – and with more fertilizer per square metre than any farmer would dare to use.


Unfinished, lots to do

I like creating Schrebergärten, a few year ago I created a 1:76 vegetable garden, the only differences in 1:45 are the size and cost of the plants - mine are Scenic Express because I could not find anything elsewhere. The set includes strawberries, green and red cabbage, cauliflower, green and red lettuce. Over the next couple of weeks, I will share the creation of a Schrebergärten for Pottendorf.

My apologies for mentioning a European socialist concept but occasionally we like to remind the colonies of their past and considering the vast majority of US immigrants originated in Central Europe, an understanding of their rich heritage is important.

Tim H





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Tim

I for one enjoyed your mentioning the German love of gardening, which is a surprise to me. When I thought of back yard gardening in the past, I automatically thought of England. It seemed to me that every Englishman had to have one, or at least lusted for one. Do any of the other European people have this obsession to the same intensity?

Not trying to start an argument about who is the most intense in this desire, just wondering.


Herb

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Herb,

Gardening is a worldwide interest, wherever a garden is possible there will be someone willing to part of nature.

It is a something that gives far more than it takes, it is not 'yardwork' instead it is far more rewarding.

Tim

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My skillset for creating model buildings is not too hot, I used to knock out some nice stuff from HO kits but moving up to O and craftsman-type kits is a whole new ballgame. I decided to use the range from Stangel.pl because their products are appropriate for the location and I rather like their modelling philosophy - laser cut cardboard. Three kits arrived a couple of months ago and I started with the easiest - a farm building. This is the first stage- the cardboard buck.

For the surface treatment, I use Stangel's own product - Acrylmasse - because it is cheap (Eu3,50 for 250gm) and it is easy to use and consistent. A  first covering of the Acrylmasse using a stiff 12mm nylon brush with a stippling action to good effect.

Due to the light colouring, it is difficult to see the actual effect of the surface treatment however with a simple application of a subtle wash, the texture will be readily apparent.

Due to the nature of the material used, modification is easy, I used wooden coffee stirrers for the bargeboards and to position the roof with hidden strips. The next building is a rural cottage.....more to follow.

Last edited on Mon May 2nd, 2016 03:18 pm by Tim H

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I like the little sag in the roof line--seldom modeled--and then taken to excess, unless the building is the very last stages of decay.

Herb

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Herb,

This kit is really something.

The learning curve was really steep but it was pure pleasure because everything fitted first time and it provides the opportunity to try new skills, something that I thought lost.

In a world in which we expect to 'buy' our way out of trouble, this made me think and dig deep, ultimately it has been a very rewarding experience and reminds me of the reasons why I got into modelling.

Having finished one building, I just couldn't wait to begin the second*, if only to further push myself.

Finally, they are do not cost much.

*I will share building the rural cottage.

Tim

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Building looks great, but can it stand the forces of train? :)

Alwin

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The Schrebergärten population have changend, however. More and more they are taken over by Turks and Russians ( many of them with German ancestors ) who exert the same diligence in keeping their gardens in shape.

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Alte Türen in Franken -  Bamberg has always been somewhere special, an affair that has lasted for over thirty years and shows no signs of cooling.
These doors are all located in Bamberg and each has an individual character, therefore the awful door offered by Stangel for Dorfstrasse 7 had to be replaced.




And this is the replacement, it also has character. 



Is anyone still following my excursion into Franconia?


Last edited on Sat May 7th, 2016 10:03 am by Tim H

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The potting shed (and compost bin)



For those who weather and distress everything, my approach may be out of step but it must be remembered that for many, the garden is their main hobby and the shed is kept in pristine order. Therefore no 'olde tyme' buildings unless they are intended to be abandoned and everything is pretty neat on Pottendorf. 

The shed started life as a chicken hut, a window was added from a Ferrero-Rocher box and strips of white-label whilst the handle is Addie. Other add-ons are Ship Cook's matches that raise the shed above the ground and a corrugated roof. The compost bin is created around a lump of blue foam covered in used tea leaves.

I enjoy creating the small details and hope to share the latest update of the garden, now that the fence is in place and the soil is being built-up around the vegetables.

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''Anyone still following?''

Yes Tim- not to worry 

Herb

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Still watching with interest Tim.
Bob

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Bob,

Just in case, you might be wondering why I publish on Freerails and not Gauge O Guild, it is simply a matter of arbitrary moderation.

Moving on,

I recently bought some tools and other gardening bits for the allotment diorama from an outfit called S&D Models - despite the claim to be O scale, most bits were better suited to 1:32. The watering can was only suitable if Hercules was employed as a gardener and their fawcett scaled out at over 15" long.

Can anyone recommend a manufacturer of O scale gardening tools?


Thanks to 'They Might be Giants'

Tim

Last edited on Sun May 8th, 2016 05:39 pm by Tim H

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I wasn't wondering Tim. Like you I post on a few forums, the guild site has a limited audience. Some things I do are more of an interest elsewhere.

Here is a local maker of castings.
http://kerrobymodels.info/o-scale-detail-parts-general.html

regards
BobC

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Hi,

I am just wondering why this thread merits a one-star rating, how does the rating system function?

Bob,

Thanks for the link, I bought some wondrous lost-wax castings of fawcetts, they scaled out at a realistic 6" long and had the characteristic bulge for the flow valve. Not bad value from Addie Modellbau considering the quality and realism BUT the watering can is going to be a scratchbuild from aluminium foil trays for meals - lovely stuff for modelling. :)

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Howdy Tim... the ratings BS is something that I don't like nor believe we need but for some reason it remains. I have seen great threads like Kieth's Gilpin thread get a couple of lousy stars but somebody posts something about using gum for locomotive drivers and it gets five. Go figure.
Over the years, I have just had to "put up with it". But that don't mean that I approve of it!
Hope this helps some.

Woodie

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Tim-

I agree 100% with Woodie, and have asked the Host to remove it. He is very helpful, but is up to his ears keeping spam out of his various customer's forums (which he does an excellent job), so I guess that removing the rating system, which would require re-writing part of the code is pretty low on his priority list That part of our program is a holdover from a previous host, run by some Indian.

Ignore it, as Woodie suggests.

Herb

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Great scenery work. I'm getting ready to use static grass for the first time, on my own layout.

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Thanks guys for responding, I asked because a thread about 'Latticework fencing' (two posts) manages to garner five stars - obviously celebrity fencing.

In deference to modellers of decreptitude, there is a need to model a small backyard full of stored bits n'pieces, inspiration for the yard was taken from an image of a village street in the 60s. The overall impression of 'neatness' of Germany even extends such scenes where even the junk is neatly stacked.

On P'Dorf I am trying not to just plonk down a building without regard for the context, instead I have used old postcards and picture albums from the 60s of local life so that the building appears to be organic to the area. Difficult to explain and even more difficult to achieve - suffice to add that the overall scene needs to blend rather than individual structures that bear no relationship to its neighbour.

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The second card building - as mentioned, I try to achieve a homogeneous appearance to the buildings within P'Dorf, this is made easier by using the same techniques and finish the buildings and the farm cottage is no exception. There was no intention to post so soon after the last but building the farm building was so enjoyable that it seemed odd not to share the next build - the cottage, Dorfstrasse 7. The image below shows what it should look like however the boarded-up ground floor will not be copied, a new door has been made and a ground floor window is on order from York Modelmaking.





The cardboard shell was pretty easy, the internal floors were omitted to allow access during construction and additional blobs of PVA were brushed into all the internal joints. The numbers are the dimensions of the door and window apeartures.






The red brickwork is an ongoing experiment with pastel chalks, some very posh Daler-Rowney water colour pencils and artists acrylic on the brickwork.


The roof is not a simple one-piece moulding, it must be built from strips of card on a base, this is the start of the construction.




And here is the roof, in place, awaiting tiles.






That's about it for now.


 






 



 

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Nice work!

Next step is to make your own doors and windows.

Not as difficult as it might sound, once you develop a system of your own.

Herb

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Almost the final part of the kitchen garden.......It is small because it needs to fit in my hand luggage when it is taken to Expos as a promotional aid for modelling 1:45.

I really need a cool drink and glass for the grandmother, it must be thirsty work sitting in the garden on a summer's day.


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The garden turned out realy nice. Next thing to do for grandma is mow grass. :cool:

Alwin

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looks good

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That's a delightful little scene. Well done!

Woodie

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I would appreciate a contact with Martin Wellberg, I am sure that Martin is part of this community.

Thanks

Tim :cool:


Last edited on Sun May 15th, 2016 06:01 pm by Tim H

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No one by that name in the member list, Tim--although he might be registered under some ''pen'' name--before I forced the use of first names. I feel that it is silly to reply to ''Mr CHOO-CHOO'' or the like, when answering questions, etc.

Herb 

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It is Milocomarty.

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Thanks, Alwin!

Another example of things that the software won't  let me do--OR-- another example of YGYYPF*

Herb

* You get what you pay for.

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Herb,

Thanks, I found Martin, unfortunately he seems to have left the party.

What I was trying to find was any guidance on the 'layering' technique for greenery unfortunately my skillset has not kept up with developments and my static grass tends to look at bit 'flat'

I have started using my stock of Silflor mat, the technique was inspired by the Jim Elster vidblogs on YouTube, whether the result is as good as Martin remains to be seen.

Tim

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Didn't leave the party, wouldn't dare to...just busy working and for now 2 days of rest..no phone, limited internet..needed that..

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Another image on the 'horrible' thread - the rating system really sucks.

This is a typical rural small home in Frankenland, just 45kms north of Nurnberg. Not every rural building in Germany looks like a 'gingerbread' house, instead many have a rendered finish and a Roman pantile roof.

The model is almost all card and paper with scrap pieces from kebab skewers, coffee stirrers and drinking straws. The ivy has individual leaves.



Tim H





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Now now Tim...Yes, I hate the "rating system" also. I got the same rating on my old thread...but with over 400K views (no, I didn't look at my thread 400,000 times), there seemed to be a few looking. Maybe they couldn't believe how awful it was or maybe it was something else.
Personally, I like your thread and hope you will keep going. I understand about being in an "unusual" scale, mine is 1:35 and I ain't gonna change a thing!

BTW, you are doing excellent work.

Woodie

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The small details make a scene convincing.

Herb

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The Eyesore - a fun project

The impression of Germany as being clean and tidy is generally correct, Germans don't tend to empty their MacDonald's carton from the car window, neither do they neglect to disguise their motorways from the neighbours. 

However they do tend to hang on to things and they do like their caravans, so much so that old caravans are recycled as garden rooms and many much loved wohnwagens can be found in the no-man's land between garden and trackside.



This rather unhappy example was just a few metres from the S7 in the upmarket suburb of leafy Grünwald, it seems to be returning to nature or at least rotting away nicely.

My starting point is a Mercury Roller toy, it is not easy to source at tatty caravan with a right-hand door.



It might take a couple of weeks but it will be suitably awful.

Tim

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Just to say goodbye.

Unfortunately a recent spell in A&E with another spell in resuss was partially due to lifestyle, work load with impossible targets and the resulting long hours with jet lag thrown in for good measure against; all have taken their toll.


The last few months have been difficult and attempts at social interaction has merely added to the stress therefore leaving the forum (and numerous other non-related social activities) was not a difficult choice.

Pottendorf will continue to be a part of the therapy process and I will post the occasional update on http://timhalesblog.blogspot.co.uk/  please keep in touch.

Many thanks to Bob Comerford and Neville Rossiter amongst so many others.

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Good luck Tim
regards
Bob

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Tim.
I don't like to see anyone kicked when their down.
You get better and do your own thing for a while.
Regards.
Neville.

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Yes, I know how it can be. I was away from model railroading for some years and in the mean time, I took care of my wife and lost her to cancer. After that, I struggled with many demons and just about lost it all...then I remembered my old addiction-model railroading-and after getting back to work, I got better & better. Don't look behind, just forward. We will be here waiting to hear from you.
A good hobby is one of the best things that you can have, don't forget it.

Take care and keep us in mind.
Woodie

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They say that a change is as good as rest, so I had both, just to make sure.

The doc is finally happy with my health and I feel a whole lot better, to celebrate this change of fortune, I intend to build a 'quickie'

Here's the full story taken from my blog.

Hi,

It seems that 'who will take over from us' is a regular and very tired Yuletide discussion on most forums populated by those with too much time on their hands. The old saw that the next generation of modellers is taken from pre-teens doesn't work (and hasn't for the past forty years), instead I target those who have paid off the mortgage, have too much time on their hands and want something that can be achieved within a shorter timeframe. In short, the active retired and pre-retirement communities who haven't already committed to a lifetime of golf or sofa surfing.

The tiny layout featured below can be built within a year and will provide a great deal of personal satisfaction for those baby-boomers who grew up with plastic kits and still want to do something with their hands and mind.

The alternate motive for the layout is that taking the trains to the people is important if we want interest within our community. Mindful of the fact that no one gets any younger, I am also reminded that I retired from exhibiting in 2014 however this idea appeared in the Carl Carendt scrapbook, it's nothing short of brilliant and is eminently do-able. The layout is not prototypical, it borrows themes from many locations and remains a 'might-have-been' in every sense.

Just two metres long including fiddle yard and effectively four wye turnouts, the plan uses the many of the buildings that are used on Pottendorf. The size of Oe (O-16.5) rolling stock allows considerable operational interest.






The boards will be 1,2m x 60cm, the trackplan will change by stretching the centre whilst the houses from Dorfstrasse on Pottendorf (see below) will be placed across the rear wall of the layout, the brewery and warehouse from the same source will hide the sidings.



Dorfstrasse

My special thanks to the Carl Carendt scrapbook for providing the inspiration. Hopefully everything will fit in the hatchback, especially as the board is only 1200mm long x 600mm wide, 4'x2' for colonial types.

The backscenes will form a protective 'box' for the layout whilst view blockers reduce the need for an additional fiddle yard whilst separate cool LED-strip lighting will be independent of the main boards.



Last edited on Mon Jan 16th, 2017 08:34 pm by Tim H

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Good to see you are back.

Nice trackplan with some fun switching possibilities.

Alwin

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Just a quiet Sunday morning. The pallets are laser cut paper and the platform used lots of coffee stir sticks.



Tim:bg:

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What is wrong with the formatting? Please delete this.

Last edited on Sun Jan 15th, 2017 01:58 pm by Tim H

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Hi Tim


I guess you are talking about Post 96


There is nothing wrong with the formatting

Freerails allows you to Post whatever size photo you wish

The text will also 'follow' the size of a Posts photo


Generally we recommend 800x--- photos

Some Members Post 1024x--- photos as well if they want to


Allowing 'oversized' images to be Posted means Members can share any hi-res drawings or panoramas etc.


You can change Post 96 using the Sites 'Edit' button if you want to

If text 'following' image size is a problem it can be Posted before or after any Post containing an 'oversized' image


Hope that helps


:f:


Eddie

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One final attempt.



Almost sixty years ago, this was Veilbronn, a small halt on the Wiesenttalbahn in Oberfranken.



Whilst this is Pottendorf in 2017.

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Hi,

A month ago, I returned from the annual 'big bash' of German O Scalers in Giessen. Unfortunately, I was not a happy bunny, the event merely emphasised how far my project has deviated from my personal view of how a model should replicate the prototype. All the layouts at the show were thin modular affairs with lots of track and no scenery- not good. However, it could be worse, I made this decision just as I began my retirement, I was making a fresh start on the last great project.

Within three weeks, all the stock and major components had been sold and I had bought a wallpaper steamer (wonderful device)  to help remove the ballasted track. 



Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.

In short, back to HO.

Tim



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