Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Model Building Aids > Making The Perfect 90-deg. Right-Angles

Freerails IS ACCEPTING new Members ... To join Freerails ... See how to Register as a Member in the 'Joining Freerails' Forum

Making The Perfect 90-deg. Right-Angles
 Moderated by: Herb Kephart Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Mon Jan 5th, 2015 08:08 am
  PMQuoteReply
1st Post
Shoulders
Registered
 

Joined: Tue Nov 26th, 2013
Location: Kent, United Kingdom
Posts: 528
Status: 
Offline
Hi all

Alwin asked about getting good 90% angles on one of his threads, Alwin is a excellent modeller and you must check out his threads and take a look at his fine work.

Just thought a would post this in here as well, most of you guys may know how to do this already but for the few who don't this may help.

I went to an engineering school were I learnt a lot of technics. I still cant get the perfect right angle but it will help you to get as close as possible to that perfectly square right angle.


At engineering school I did the following:-

I used engineer's blue or a marker pen to colour the bass, scriber, steel rule and an engineers square for marking out.

1st
colour the brass using engineers ink or marker pen

2nd

Scribe the brass along one edge with a scriber and steel rule.

3rd

Place the sheet brass with the scribed line vertical in a smooth soft jaw vice and cut down words with a piercing saw just out side the line you wish to cut (Not inside).

2nd

Reposition the brass sheet so the line is now horizontally positioned in the vice. With the use of a large very fine and dead flat file, file the brass along the full length one stroke at a time in one direction only going away from you until you reach the line. (Whilst doing this constantly check with a steal rule by holding the steel rule against the cut edge/line and then holding it up to the light, if you see any light then the cut is un-even and if there is no day light can be seen all the way along length then the cut is straight.

This now give you a piece of brass with a dead straight edge to work from.

4th

Making a 90% cut

Check the square is square by drawing a 90% line with the square on a piece of scrap, flip the square over and draw another line. Hopefully the line is exactly parallel as the first.

5th

Now we can start drawing out the 90% cut we wish to make on the sheet of brass by holding the square on the dead straight edge of the brass sheet we are using. When happy scribe the sheet and then use the same cutting and filling methods as used as mentioned previous. This should give you a dead straight 90% cut.



The piece of brass, plasticard or wood must have one straight edge to work from, having a good square with no straight line to work from doesn't give you a 90% angle. Any bowing or wavy line on the edge we are working from means the square will sit -or+ of the 90% angle you wish to make.

I hope this helps and I have explained it clear enough. I was never good at English (grammar and spellings).

Kind regards Dan



____________________
Daniel
http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=6667&forum_id=6
http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=5794&forum_id=4
My Club-http://www.ehmrc.org.uk/about.html
Our Club Exhibition-http://www.ehmrc.org.uk/exhibs.html
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jan 5th, 2015 12:30 pm
  PMQuoteReply
2nd Post
Paglesham
Registered
 

Joined: Sun Aug 24th, 2008
Location: East Anglia, United Kingdom
Posts: 234
Status: 
Offline
Good advice, there, Dan.

I tend to use the tops of my vice jaws as a straightedge for speed.

I also like to use a 3 square saw file. Being double ended, you get 6 goes at a cut before having to clean it up.

Also, use CZ120 sheet. it's free cutting quality and doesn't clog your files.

Martin



____________________
Manifestly it is better to use simple tools expertly than to possess a bewildering assortment of complicated gadgets and either neglect or use them incompetently. ( L.T.C.Rolt) Blog @ http://oddsoracle.blogspot.co.uk/
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jan 5th, 2015 08:24 pm
  PMQuoteReply
3rd Post
Alwin
Registered


Joined: Sat Jun 29th, 2013
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 544
Status: 
Offline
Hi Dan and Martin,

Thanks for the tips.
Martin you mentioned CZ120 sheet. I've never heard of this until now. When I google this I only found English pages. How different is it compared to normal brass? Can you really cut it with a knife?

Alwin

Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jan 5th, 2015 09:09 pm
  PMQuoteReply
4th Post
Bernd
Registered
 

Joined: Wed Jul 18th, 2012
Location: South Of Rochester, New York USA
Posts: 1091
Status: 
Offline
Alwin wrote: Hi Dan and Martin,

Thanks for the tips.
Martin you mentioned CZ120 sheet. I've never heard of this until now. When I google this I only found English pages. How different is it compared to normal brass? Can you really cut it with a knife?

Alwin


It's engraving brass. Apparently quite soft.

http://www.columbiametals.com/products/brass/cz120

Bernd



____________________
A PESSIMIST sees a dark tunnel
An OPTIMIST sees light at the end of the tunnel
A REALIST sees a freight train
The LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER sees three idiots standing on the tracks
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jan 5th, 2015 11:53 pm
  PMQuoteReply
5th Post
Tramcar Trev
Registered


Joined: Sat Mar 16th, 2013
Location: Gordon ACT, Australia
Posts: 415
Status: 
Offline
Its got lead in it which means its free machining. Ok a tip, because I do not own a guilotene to cut sheet metal with ( its on my list with a trillion other things and they are expensive in smaller sizes) I find leaded brass sheet cuts very neatly with an Olfa Plastics cutter, dont try and "hook in" just drag the blade (you should get a small quantity of swarf) over the sheet till its halfway through and it will break like most plastics....
You can get them at most decent hardware stores or online; http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/OLFA-13mm-Plastic-Laminate-Heavy-Duty-Cutter-PC-L-/261388977962?pt=AU_Hand_Tools&hash=item3cdbff472a

The blades can also be sharpened with a fine diamond hone.



____________________
There once was a man who said Damn!!
I perceive with regret that I am
A creature that moves
in predestinate groves
I'm not a Bus, I'm a tram
Back To Top

 Posted: Tue Jan 6th, 2015 09:52 am
  PMQuoteReply
6th Post
Paglesham
Registered
 

Joined: Sun Aug 24th, 2008
Location: East Anglia, United Kingdom
Posts: 234
Status: 
Offline
Alwin,
CZ120 and, in extruded form, CZ121 are grades of brass as Bernd says, intended for engraving. It is certainly not soft. But it is very brittle, which may be why some people cut it as Trev describes. I've never tried that in all my years of working with it.
I always buy mine from engravers as offcuts. They tend to do 1 and 2 or 1.5mm thicknesses.
All my brass masters were made in CZ120. The advantage shows when it's time to engrave the door shuts and window frames. When polished it looks more like gold than gold does and is so much nicer to work!
It also gets called leaded brass, half hard or silicon brass.

Cheers,
Martin



____________________
Manifestly it is better to use simple tools expertly than to possess a bewildering assortment of complicated gadgets and either neglect or use them incompetently. ( L.T.C.Rolt) Blog @ http://oddsoracle.blogspot.co.uk/
Back To Top

 Posted: Tue Jan 6th, 2015 02:30 pm
  PMQuoteReply
7th Post
Herb Kephart
Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 6077
Status: 
Offline
OK, you folks that use the engraving brass, how do you rate it VS nickel silver- a material that is virtually unknown on this side of the big puddle, for scratch building? Pros? Cons?

Herb



____________________
Fix it again, Mr Gates--it still works!"
Back To Top

 Posted: Tue Jan 6th, 2015 05:35 pm
  PMQuoteReply
8th Post
Paglesham
Registered
 

Joined: Sun Aug 24th, 2008
Location: East Anglia, United Kingdom
Posts: 234
Status: 
Offline
Oh, Nickel silver every time, Herb, IF you can get it. It works better, solders better and takes paint better.
Looks so much nicer before paint, too. I use 1mm sheet for my little NG masters for N-Drive.

Martin



____________________
Manifestly it is better to use simple tools expertly than to possess a bewildering assortment of complicated gadgets and either neglect or use them incompetently. ( L.T.C.Rolt) Blog @ http://oddsoracle.blogspot.co.uk/
Back To Top

 Posted: Tue Jan 6th, 2015 05:36 pm
  PMQuoteReply
9th Post
Paglesham
Registered
 

Joined: Sun Aug 24th, 2008
Location: East Anglia, United Kingdom
Posts: 234
Status: 
Offline
Damn! This site is SO slow to load! Could one of those be removed?
I'm not a patient man with computers!

Martin



____________________
Manifestly it is better to use simple tools expertly than to possess a bewildering assortment of complicated gadgets and either neglect or use them incompetently. ( L.T.C.Rolt) Blog @ http://oddsoracle.blogspot.co.uk/
Back To Top

 Posted: Wed Jan 7th, 2015 05:41 am
  PMQuoteReply
10th Post
Kent K
Registered


Joined: Sun Nov 9th, 2014
Location: Kansas City, Missouri USA
Posts: 55
Status: 
Offline
Martin,
Loading speed is a function of your Internet connection and the horsepower of your machine. It may be time to upgrade either one or both. I am using an Intel I5 machine with 32 gigabytes of memory and a one megabyte per second ISP. I have no complaints about the speed of this site or any other.
Ken



____________________
Kent K
In a world without walls and fences, who needs Windows and Gates
Back To Top


 Current time is 03:28 pm
Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  

Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Model Building Aids > Making The Perfect 90-deg. Right-Angles
Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems